• Request Info about a trip
  • How to join a team?
UK: +44 (0)7810 375400 & USA: +1 360-570-0715 info@summitclimb.com
UK: +44 (0)7810 375400 & USA: +1 360-570-0715

Everest South Side Nepal Camp 3 Training Climb Expedition

  • everest nepal training photo Camp 2 looking towards the Lhotse face. Photo – John Dowd
  • everest camp 3 Learning fixed rope technique. Photo - John
  • everest nepal training photo Climber in Khumbu Icefall. Photo – John Dowd
  • everest camp 3 The famous Khumbu Icefall. Photo – Sam
  • everest nepal training photo Climbing the fixed lines. Photo – John Dowd
  • everest camp 3 Mount Everest and Lhotse. Photo - Stew
  • everest nepal training photo The last few steps into camp 3. Photo Squash
  • everest camp 3 Training in basecamp. Photo - Stew
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  • Full Service Cost: $10,150, £8,050, €8,950. Sixteen day option : $8,150, £6,450, €7,150. (Price fixed in $USD. £GBP and €EUR price for convenience only, converted January 3, 2020)

  • Date: 5 April to 5 May 2020 or 19 April to 19 May 2020 (call for custom dates)

  • 16 day option: 15 April to 30 April 2020 or 29 April to 14 May 2020

  • Experienced leaders: Dan Mazur and Don Wargowsky from UK and USA, 12 Everest expeditions, friendly, good teachers, well organized.
  • Train and prepare to climb Everest by climbing to Camp 3.

  • Learn about high altitude Everest expeditions, glacier travel and ice climbing.

  • Perform well and transfer to an Everest or Lhotse summit climb.

Recent News: Our spring Everest Nepal Camp 3 Training Climb has just returned from a successful climb on the mountain. Please click here to view news of our expedition.

    

Please watch the exciting video by Mario Hasanakos and Rob Bradley
.  

Overview:

Join leaders Dan Mazur and Don Wargowsky on a 31 day long expedition to camp 3 on the Nepal side of Mount Everest. This training and climb to 7300 meters (23,950) is an excellent opportunity to see how you feel at high altitude on Everest in a short amount of time for a reduced cost. Mount Everest, at 8848 meters (29,035 feet) is perhaps the most coveted mountain in the world. The dates we have chosen feature the best weather of the year, and run in conjunction with the exciting spring Everest climbing season. We teach everything you need to know in special training sessions in base camp. Climbing up to camp 3 could qualify you for climbing Everest.If you feel well enough on the April 5th trip, you could join our Everest expedition or Lhotse Expedition "on the spot".

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  • How to join a team?
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Everest Expedition Training Climb Cost | SummitClimb

Our “full-service” expedition includes:

  • British, American, and European leader/coordinator
  • Climbing Sherpa for the group
  • All internal / domestic transport
  • Full service trek to / from base camp
  • Three meals per day
  • Permit fees and liaison officers
  • Group gear, emergency equipment, satellite phone
  • Personal tents in basecamp (no sharing)
  • Double occupancy tents above base camp
  • Full base camp with dinning tent, showers, bathroom, and solar charging
  • Two nights stay in Kathmandu hotel on arrival and two nights prior to departure in a double room. Private rooms are available for a small additional fee

What is not included?

  • International flights to Kathmandu and back home
  • Mountain climbing rescue and travel insurance
  • Personal climbing/trekking equipment and clothing
  • Nepal visa
  • Gratuities for staff

Sixteen-Day Option: Members who wish to meet the team at Everest Base Camp on day 11 of the itinerary must arrange their own trek before and after the 16 days of glacier travel. All of the services provided to our full-service members will be offered to members who wish to only do the 16 day program. This may be a great option for those who are participating in other treks/climbs in the region. Sixteen day option cost: 8,150, £6,450, €7,150.

Add on High Attitude Support : Click here for prices

  • Private Sherpa (personal guide/porter) – Carries up to 10 kg (22bs) of your personal equipment, climbs with you, melts water, cooks, and will be with you every step of the way.
  • Personal equipment carriage service – Sherpa carry up to 10kg (22lbs) of personal equipment up and down the mountain between camps


Matt on ladder at the famous Khumbu Ice Fall. Photo Matt

Everest Expedition Training Climb Itinerary | SummitClimb

1) Arrive in Kathmandu, 1300 meters (4,265 feet). Stay at hotel.

2) Orientation meeting and chance to buy last minute supplies, visit temples, and tour the city. Stay at hotel.


3) Fly to Lukla, 2860 meters (9,385 feet). Walk to Phakding 2650 meters (8,695 feet). Teahouse or camping.


4) Walk to Namche Bazaar, 3450 meters (11,320 feet). Teahouse or camping


5) Rest day with acclimatization hike in Namche. Teahouse or camping;


6) Walk to Pangboche, 3750 meters (12,300 feet). Participate in a Buddhist Puja blessing ceremony with the local Lama at the monastery if you wish. Teahouse or camping


7) Walk to Pheriche, 4250 meters (13,945 feet). Visit the Himalayan Rescue Association health clinic. Teahouse or camping


8) Walk to Dugla, 4600 meters (15,090 feet). Teahouse or camping


9) Walk to Lobuche, 4900 meters (16,075 feet). Teahouse of camping


10) Walk to GorakShep, 5150 meters (16,900 feet). Teahouse or camping


11) Walk to basecamp, 5340 meters (17,400 feet). Camping


12) Rest, organization, and training day in basecamp


13) Rest, organization, and training day in basecamp


14) Walk to Pumori basecamp, 5300 meters (17,390 feet). Sleep there.


15) Rest in basecamp


16) Climb to camp 1 at 6100 meters (20,010 feet). Sleep at camp 1.


17) Rest in Camp 1


18) Walk partway to Camp 2. Return to camp 1. Sleep at camp 1


19) Climb to camp 2. Sleep there.


20) Rest in Camp 2


21) Rest in Camp 2. Walk to the base of the Lhotse Face and return to camp 2. Sleep in Camp 2


22) Rest in Camp 2


23) Climb to camp 3 at 7300 meters (23,950 feet). Sleep in Camp 3


24) Walk/Climb down to camp 2. Sleep in Camp 2


25) Walk down to basecamp


26) Pack up basecamp and trek down to Pangboche. Teahouse or camping


27) Trek to Namche. Teahouse or camping


28) Trek to Lukla. Teahouse or camping


29) Flight to Kathmandu. Stay at hotel


30) Extra day in Kathmandu, in case of delay, and for sightseeing, gift shopping. Hotel.


31) Fly Home. Thanks for joining our expedition!

everest train

Ice training at Everest Basecamp. Camp 3. Photo Fabrick and Ricci

Everest Expedition Training Climb Leadership | SummitClimb

Leadership: Dan Mazur and Don Wargowsky are relaxed, friendly, well organized, and highly skilled professional with over 30 years combined experience leading people to the summits of mountains such as Everest, Lhotse, K2, Broad Peak, Gasherbrum, Cho Oyu, Lhotse, Manaslu, Shishapangma, AmaDablam, and Baruntse

Sherpas: We employ some of Nepal, Tibet, and the Karakorum’s best local mountaineers and Sherpas to assist team members in realizing their summit goals. Our friendly and loyal high altitude climbing staff has supported teams to the summits of more than ten of the highest peaks in the Himalaya.

Everest Expedition Training Climb, Your Experience & Training | SummitClimb

Winter snow walking experience and experience at high altitude is highly recommended. The trip includes brief climbing clinics. We will teach you everything you need to know on glacier near basecamp. To be successful, proper conditioning is critical to your success on Everest. Team members are expected to be very fit and in good health. Proper training with a focus on long hikes carrying a backpack is essential.

Everest Expedition Training Climb Personal & Team Equipment | SummitClimb

Climbing:

  • Climbing harness
  • 5 meters (16 ft.) of 6mm accessory cord
  • Figure 8 abseil/belay device (tube style devices, i.e. ATC will not work on fixed lines)
  • Full size ascender (i.e. PetzlAscention)
  • 2 locking carabiners, 1 large and 1 small
  • 4 non-locking carabiners
  • Ice axe with leash
  • Steel crampons with anti-balling plates
  • Trekking poles
  • Abseiling/Rappelling Gloves

Upper Body:

  • 2 cotton t-shirts
  • 2 synthetic t-shirts
  • 2 long sleeve synthetic shirts
  • Light-weight soft shell jacket
  • Medium weight insulatingjacket (fleece, down, or synthetic)
  • Hard shell jacket with hood, waterproof and breathable (Gore-Tex or similar)
  • Heavy down coat

    • For 6,000m peaks a very warm down coat with hood or an 8,000m coat with hood
    • For 7,000m peaks an 8,000m coat with hood
    • For 8,000m peaks an 8,000m down coat with hood or an 8,000m suit can be used instead

Hands:

  • Lightweight poly-liner gloves
  • Mid-weight soft shell gloves – water/wind resistant
  • Heavy- weight waterproof gloves – Gore-tex shell with removable liner
  • Expedition weight mittens -Gore-tex over mitt matched polar fleece mitt liner

Head:

  • Helmet
  • Warm hat that covers your ears
  • Balaclava
  • Face mask
  • Baseball hat or brimmed sun hat
  • Glacier sunglasses with side shields
  • Ski goggles with light and dark lenses
  • Headlamp with extra batteries and bulbs
  • Buff/neck gaiter
  • Bandana or head scarf (optional)

Lower Body:

  • Synthetic underwear
  • Hiking shorts
  • Hiking pants
  • 2 pair lightweight thermal bottoms
  • Medium or expedition weight thermal bottoms
  • Polar fleece or soft shell pants
  • Waterproof/breathable pants with full side zips (Gore-Tex or similar)
  • Heavy insulating pants

    • For 6,000m peaks: Down or synthetic pants will full zips
    • For 7,000m peaks: 8,000m down pants
    • For 8,000m peaks: 8,000m down pants or a 8,000m suit can be used instead

Feet:

  • Boots

    • For 6,000m peaks: Plastic or composite double boots (Koflach, La SportivaSpantik, etc) Modern waterproof, single boots designed for 4-5,000m peaks may be suitable if they can be worn with 2 pairs of socks and vapor barrier lines and/or they are equipped with overboots
    • For 7,000m: Plastic or composite double boots (Koflach, La SportivaSpantik, etc)
    • For 8,000m peaks: 8,000m boots - One-Sport Millet Everest boots or equivalent

  • Sturdy leather walking boots
  • Trainers, running shoes and/or sandals
  • Down booties (optional)
  • 3 pair med-heavy poly or wool socks
  • 2 pair poly or wool liner socks (optional)
  • Vapor barrier liner socks (optional)
  • 2 pair lightweight trekking socks
  • Cotton socks for in town

Sleeping:

  • Down sleeping bag

    • For 6,000m peaks: -18C or 0F
    • For 7,000m peaks:-23C or -10F (If you sleep cold consider -29C or -20F)
    • For 8,000m peaks: -29C or -20F (If you sleep cold consider -40C or -40F)

  • An additional down sleeping bag for basecamp for the following climbs: Everest, Lhotse, AmaDablam, Manaslu, Cho Oyu, Shishapangma, Broad Peak, K2, Gasherbrum I and II, Spantik, K2/Broad Peak Everest training climb. For Mastagata a second sleeping bag is optional, but highly recommended.

    • Down base camp sleeping bag should be rated to -10C or 15F (If you sleep cold consider -18C or 0F)

  • 2 closed cell foam kari-mats (sleeping pads) for use in basecamp and high altitude (these can be purchased inexpensively in Kathmandu)
  • High quality inflatable sleeping pad designed for cold weather (Thermarest)
  • Patch kit for inflatable pad

Rucksack and Travel Bags:

  • Medium rucksack/backpack (50-70 litres / 3000-4500 cubic inches, can be used as carry-on bag)
  • Waterproof rucksack cover (optional)
  • 2 large (120+ L / 7500+ cubic inch) duffle kit bags for clothing and equipment
  • Small luggage locks for duffel kit bags

Personal Hygiene:

  • Female or male hygiene supplies
  • 2 tubes lip sun cream
  • Large tube skin sun cream (min factor 30)
  • Anti-mosquito cream
  • Toothpaste/brush
  • Hand sanitizer gel (small-medium bottle)
  • Bar of soap small towel
  • Hand wipes

Medical:

  • Small personal first-aid kit. (Simple and Light) Aspirin, first-aid tape, plasters (band-aids), personal medications, etc.
  • Blister repair kit
  • 10 anti-diarrhea pills
  • 20 anti-headache pills
  • 10 cough and/or cold medicine
  • Anti-altitude sickness pills: Diamox, Acetylzolamide (optional)
  • 10 Stomach antibiotics: Ciprofloxacin, etc.
  • 5 Azithomycine tables
  • Steri pen or bottle of water purification tablets
  • Cough sweets/lozenges (Halls/Stepils)
  • Earplugs
  • Extra prescription glasses/contact lenses and supplies

Personal Food:

  • Snack food/daily energy food

    • Everest training Nepal/Tibet, AmaDablam, Baruntse: 2-4kg (4.5-9lbs)
    • Spantik, Cho Oyu, Shishapangma, Mustagata, Manasu: 2-5kg (4.5-11lbs)
    • Broad Peak, K2, Gasherbrum I/II, K2/Everest training, Everest, Lhotse: 3-6kg (6.5-13lbs)

  • Dehydrated meals (freeze-dried dinners) for summit attempt

    • Everest training Nepal/Tibet, AmaDablam: 2 meals
    • Spantik, Cho Oyu, Shishapangma, Mustagata, Manasu, Baruntse: 3 meals
    • Broad Peak, K2, Gasherbrum I/II, K2/Everest training, Everest, Lhotse: 5 meals
Practical:

  • Small roll of repair tape
  • Sewing repair kit
  • Cigarette lighter
  • Small box matches
  • Compass or GPS
  • Battery powered alarm clock/watch
  • Camera with extra cards and extra batteries
  • Nylon stuff sacks for food and gear storage
  • 2 water bottles (1 litre) wide-mouth Nalgene
  • Pee bottle (1litre or larger)
  • Plastic cup and spoon
  • Small folding knife
  • Binoculars (optional)
  • 4 large, waterproof, disposable rubbish sacks
  • Passport, 2 extra passport photos, flight ticket, flight itinerary
  • Separate photocopies of passport and relevant visa pages, proof of insurance
  • Dollars, pounds, or euros cash
  • Bank/ATM/Cash and credit cards
  • Bathing suit/swim suit (you never know)
  • Paperback books, playing cards, ipod/mp3 player, musical instruments, extra batteries, etc.
  • Travel clothes for basecamp and in town
  • Umbrella (optional)
  • Small solar panels for personal electronics (optional)


Group Equipment:

We provide group gear, equipment, and supplies including: rope, ice, rock, and snow anchor protection, tents; stoves, fuel, walkie-talkie radios, bamboo marker wands, etcetera. A personal tent will be provided for each member at base camp. On the upper mountain, team members will share tents. In base camp, a shower, toilet, solar charger, and a dining tent will be provided.

Everest Expedition Training Climb Questions and Answers Section | SummitClimb

Everest Expedition Training Climb Application | SummitClimb

Please fill out an application and return it to us with your refundable ten-percent deposit to hold your place on the team.


In addition to your application, we will need the following at least two months before the trip begins:
 

  • Completed Payment
  • Oxygen order (if any)
  • Sherpa order (if any)
  • Trip Registration form
  • 1 Passport sized photo
  • A scan of your passport identification pages
  • Complete flight itinerary
  • Proof of travel, accident, and repatriation insurance. We strongly recommend Global Rescue, with at least $50,000 worth of helicopter rescue insurance.
  • Trip cancellation/interruption insurance is recommended

Please contact us with any questions you may have.

everest training nepal

Camp 1 Everest. Photo Ricci

Everest Nepal Training Climb Programme Description

Please click one of the links below to view that section of our introductory information or just scroll down Members wave in the Western Cwm between camp 1 and camp 2 (photo right by Dan Mazur: Members wave in the Western Cwm between camp 1 and camp 2).

 

Everest Nepal Training Climb Programme Description:

  • Introduction: Dan Mazur is leading a new 31 day long 7300 metre/24,000 foot high expedition to camp 3 on the Everest Nepal side this year. It’s going to be an excellent opportunity to see how you feel at high altitude on Everest in a short amount of time for a reduced cost.  Mount Everest  at 8848 metres / 29,035 feet is perhaps the most coveted mountain in the world. The south (Nepalese) side is the route first climbed by Tenzing and Hillary in 1953, and the dates we have chosen feature the best weather of the year. We teach you everything you need to know in special training sessions in base camp and the few days of climbing are mainly steep walking. The actual climbing on this fun trip could be best described as steep walking/climbing, with climbers attached to fixed ropes and the dates we have chosen run in conjunction with the exciting spring Everest climbing season. Climbing up to camp 3 could qualify you for climbing Everest.

Paula practices on a ladder, while Lakpa Nuru holds the ropes and Jonas looks on. Mike Fairman photo. Monika Witkowska practicing in the icefall. Violetta Pontinen photo.Beow Lim abseiling in the Khumbu Icefall (Beow Lim).  A sherpa crossing five ladders over a crevasse (Alex Holt).

Paula practices on a ladder, while Lakpa Nuru holds the ropes and Jonas looks on. Mike Fairman photo. Monika Witkowska practicing in the icefall. Violetta Pontinen photo. Beow Lim abseiling in the Khumbu Icefall (Beow Lim).  A team member crossing five ladders over a crevasse (Alex Holt).

    • Climbing to camp 3 is an exciting challenge all on its own and could also qualify you for: Cho Oyu , Lhotse , Everest from Tibet or Everest from Nepal

    • If you feel well enough on the April trip, you could join our Everest expedition "on the spot".

    • Our proposed schedule allows for acclimatization, training, practice and rest. Our expedition is cautious and careful, with excellent leadership, organization, Sherpa climbers, cooks and waiters, tasty food, the best equipment, two full kitchens in basecamp plus advanced basecamp, 1000s of metres of fixed rope, rock ice and snow anchors, top-quality high altitude tents and high altitude stoves, expedition mix gas, and full safety equipment: medical oxygen, gamow bag, and extensive medical kit. You do not have to carry a heavy rucksack for any portion of the trip.

    • This expedition maximizes experience gained over 11 prior Everest expeditions, years of accumulated wisdom of the high Himalaya, a strong record of reaching the top of 7000 metre/23,000 foot & 6000 metre/20,000 foot peaks: Mustagata , Aconcagua , Ama Dablam , Everest View Glacier School to Lobuche East , Baruntse , Mera Peak , Everest Camp 3 Training CLimbs and many other summits.  with a strong record of reaching the top of our world's highest peaks. In addition to more than 25 Himalayan expeditions we have an intimate knowledge of the Nepalese officials who regulate the permit system, liaison officers, sherpas, cooks, yak drivers, and hoteliers/restaurateurs.  back to topOur expedition features one of the most breathtaking treks in the world, included in the price
  • Leader and staff: In Kathmandu, during the trek, in basecamp, and on the climb, our experienced staff is with you all of the way. Our helpful climbing sherpas are some of the best. They are real high-altitude star-performers and very friendly. Our western leader is a highly experienced, friendly, and well-organized professional with multiple ascents of Everest. Skillful basecamp cooks prepare delicious, fresh, tasty food and hot drinks at least 3 times a day.

    • On trek: Our western leader, together with friendly and helpful sherpas, cooks and local people leading yak caravans carry all of your personal equipment, group equipment, and set up camp each day, prepare and serve delicious meals, so you can relax and enjoy the trek. You do not need to carry a heavy rucksack during the trek (photo right by Bruce Manning: Our expedition features one of the most breathtaking treks in the world, included in the price).
    • Our comfortable basecamp: Our cooks and waiters will serve you delicious meals in our heated dining tent.
    • On the mountain: Our western leader and group sherpas will fix the route, set up the high camps and carry the group equipment, such as tents, stoves, etc. If you wish to help out, we welcome you to do so, otherwise just relax and focus on getting well acclimated and achieving your goals. You do not need to carry a heavy rucksack during the climb.

Stew on 5 stage ladder (Squash Falconer). Climber works her way up the hard blue ice at the top of the Lhotse face (Alex Holt).  Stewart Edge climbing the final few steps into camp 3. Thats the Geneva Spur on the left (Squash Falconer).   Leslie Binns going down to camp 1. Photo Gary Ervin

Stew on 5 stage ladder (Squash Falconer). Climber works her way up the hard blue ice at the top of the Lhotse face (Alex Holt). Stewart Edge climbing the final few steps into camp 3. Thats the Geneva Spur on the left (Squash Falconer). Leslie Binns going down to camp 1. Photo Gary Ervin

  • Everest National Park: The park covers an area of 1148 square kilometres in the Khumbu region of Nepal. This includes Mt. Everest and several other well known peaks such as Lhotse, Pumori, Island Peak, and Ama Dablam. Mt. Everest and the surrounding area is a 'world biosphere reserve'. Since 1976 the park has served to safeguard unique cultural, physical and scientific values through sound conservation principles. Vegetation in the park varies from oak, pine and hemlock forests at lower altitudes to fir, juniper, birch and rhododendron woods at mid-elevations. Scrub and alpine plant communities with bare rock and glacier are found above the tree line. 22 species of rhododendron bloom during the spring (April and May) and much of the flora is colourful throughout the year. Wild animals most likely to be seen in the park are Himalayan tahr, goral, serow, musk deer, and well over 100 different bird species (photo right by Tunc Findik: Namche Bazaar at 3,440 metre/11,300 feet, the capital of the Sherpa people. See this unique village on our trek to and from basecamp).  back to top Namche Bazaar at 3,440 metre/11,300 feet, the capital of the Sherpa people. See this unique village on our trek to and from basecamp
  • Trek to basecamp: This is one of the most beautiful treks in the world with ancient snow-free paths winding past green terraced villages, rushing streams crossed on swinging bridges and each night a comfortable 'teahouse' or a good tent pitched in a quiet pasture beneath the highest peaks in the world. Throughout the trek we eat delicious meals prepared by our skillful cooks. The trek will be moderately paced, allowing plenty of time for acclimatization, rest and site-seeing. Together we retrace the classic "Everest Approach March" made by Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa. The trek winds through some of the most spectacular mountain scenery on earth, where you can relax in exotic, friendly Sherpa villages. Our trusty yaks and porters carry all of your baggage, so you don't have to carry a heavy rucksack.

  • Basecamp: Features your own private sleeping tent that will be all your own, not needing to be shared with anyone. We have comfortable, heated dining tents with tables and chairs where our cooks and waiters will serve you delicious meals. back to top

  • Training days: After taking a rest day in  Everest basecamp we will begin several days of training before setting out for the high camps. Our training will consist of learning and practicing glacier rope techniques, ice-climbing, crevasse rescue and snow-camping. There will be ample opportunity for you to test out equipment, ask lots of questions and, most of all, have fun. We will also spend some time walking up to Mt. Pumori advanced basecamp during our training days to acquire safe and comfortable acclimatization to the rising altitude. 
  • Climbing to the high camps:

    Our team members starting their ascent of the Lhotse face
    • Above basecamp: Clip in to the fixed lines to head through the awe-inspiring Khumbu Icefall up to the plateau of the Western Cwm and camp 1, at 5800 metres/19,000 feet.
    • From camp 1: The route traverses the flattish bottom of the Western Cwm, to 6200 metres/20,300 feet to camp 2 (photo right by Bruce Manning: Our team members starting their ascent of the Lhotse face);
    • Camp 2: Located on a rocky moraine below the awe-inspiring west-face of Everest. In camp 2 our sherpa cook will prepare hot meals and drinks. 
    • Camp 3: Located on a flat-ish section protected by solid ice walls at about 7300 metres/24,00 feet on the Lhotse face. To reach camp 3, we must negotiate the Lhotse Face. The Lhotse face is not very technical, in fact, after climbing the initial 38-65 degree 100 metre/300 foot high ramp, the average slope angle of the entire 'face' is around 30 degrees.
  • Rest Days: During your rest days we encourage you to concentrate on recovering, eating and drinking, to read, relax, listen to music and stroll around visiting other teams. back to top
  • Who is this trip for? (photo below right by Tunc Findik: The Lhotse face).The Lhotse face
    • We encourage men and women from around the world, of all ages to join us as an individual team member or with your own group, whether that is your spouse, partner, friends, sibling, clients, colleagues, etc. Most of our members join as individuals, our team dynamics work well, and we are able to build successful and safe groups that enjoy trekking, climbing, and traveling together.
    • During the Everest camp 3 training climb expedition, we teach you all of the skills needed to ascend safely in special training sessions in basecamp and advanced basecamp. Our training covers glacier travel, ascending and descending ropes safely, etcetera. If you do not already know about mountaineering you are welcome to join us and see how you feel at 7000 metres/23,000 feet.
    • If you decide you like it, we welcome you to join one of our 8000 metre climbs the next season, or if you are determined, you could try going for the summit of Everest and join our team on the spot.
    • To participate in this expedition you must be a very fit and active winter-walker-climber in good health. Prior to joining, please see your doctor and obtain the necessary permission and advice. back to top

Please "click" one of the links on the column on the upper right of your screen under "Everest Training Climb" to learn more about our expedition.

Everest Expedition Training Climb Route | SummitClimb

Please click one of the links below to view that section for the route on the Everest Camp 3 Training Climb, or scroll down.

Introduction-
Dan Mazur is leading a new 31 day long 7300 metre/24,000 foot high expedition to camp 3 on the Everest Nepal side this year. It’s going to be an excellent opportunity to see how you feel at high altitude on Everest in a short amount of time for a reduced cost.  Mount Everest  at 8848 metres / 29,035 feet is perhaps the most coveted mountain in the world. The south (Nepalese) side is the route first climbed by Tenzing and Hillary in 1953, and the dates we have chosen feature the best weather of the year. We teach you everything you need to know in special training sessions in base camp and the few days of climbing are mainly steep walking. The actual climbing on this fun trip could be best described as steep walking/climbing, with climbers attached to fixed ropes and the dates we have chosen run in conjunction with the exciting spring Everest climbing season. Climbing up to camp 3 could qualify you for climbing Everest.
This expedition maximizes experience gained over 11 prior Everest expeditions, years of accumulated wisdom of the high Himalaya, a strong record of reaching the top of 7000 metre/23,000 foot & 6000 metre/20,000 foot peaks: Mustagata , Aconcagua , Island Peak , Ama Dablam , Kilimanjaro, Mt. Kenya , North Col, Lhakpa Ri , and many other summits.  with a strong record of reaching the top of our world's highest peaks. In addition to more than 25 Himalayan expeditions we have an intimate knowledge of the Nepalese officials who regulate the permit system, liaison officers, sherpas, cooks, yak drivers, and hoteliers/restaurateurs.

Andrew Brash climbing a steep Lhotse face ice-wall on the way to camp 3. Everest is behind him on the left (Christian Otto). Our awesome sherpas Thile and Tenji in between camp 1 and camp 2 (Samuli Mansikka). 
Itinerary-

The proposed itinerary allows enough time for proper acclimatization, rest days, and several returns to base camp, where the kitchen and base camp staff can look after all of your needs, and quell your appetite. The weather at this time of year is normally quite good and stable. However, we all know the global weather is changing, and in case of storms, you will note the proposed itinerary includes extra days as well. In previous expeditions, half of those who reached the summit needed every single "extra" day.

Weather-

At low elevation, the temperatures can vary from 27°c to -7°c ( 80°f to 20°f). At higher elevations, the temperature can vary from 16°c to -23°c (60°f to -10°f). The wind is the most chilling factor, and can be quite variable, with everything from a flat calm, to very strong on the Lhotse face. There may be deep snow, heavy rains, mosquitoes in wet areas, blowing dust, burning heat, bright sunshine.

Arriving in Kathmandu-

The trip begins in the ancient and colorful city of Kathmandu, and the staff will personally meet your flight at Tribhuvan airport. You stay in a comfortable, simple, clean hotel, and sample some of the tasty Nepalese, Tibetan and Western-Style cuisine, at minimal expense. During our free day in Kathmandu, we shall finalize arrangements, and take some time out for trinket hunting, with planned visits to explore the 17th century splendors of the Monkey Temple, the Durbar Square and old Kings Palace, as well as the ancient city of Patan. back to top

A view of the Bouddhanath Stupa, the biggest stupa in Nepal, which lies about 7 km east of the capital. The Bouddhanath stupa, also called by many as Khasti Chitya, is one of the oldest stupas in the country. After 1959, many Tibetans arrived and settled in Bouddhanath area. The stupa, a well-known Buddhist pilgrimage site, is included in World Heritage Cultural site list by UNESCO (Samuli Mansikka).

Trekking to Basecamp-

Early the following morning we fly to Lukla at 2,850 metres/9,400 feet., where we meet our yak drivers, and porters. If there is time, we will trek to Monjo (2,650 metres/8,700 feet), and spend the night. For our full-service members, the cost of this expedition includes one of the most beautiful treks in the world. For more information and photos, please visit our Everest trek section of the site: Everest Trek.

 
Namche Bazaar, the capital of the Sherpa people. See this unique village on our trek to and from basecamp (Tunc Findik).

We will continue our trek up to Namche Bazaar (3,450 metres/11,300 feet), the capital of the Sherpa Kingdom. Here we rest for a day to acclimate, then proceed up to Deboche (3,750 metres/12,300 feet) for a night, then to Lobuche (4,950 metres/16,200 feet), where we have another acclimatization day. Finally, we make the last trek to basecamp at 5,300 metres/17,400 feet.

Climbing to Everest Camp 3-

After resting, organizing, and training in basecamp for a day, we will begin our climb. We start with a day hike through the awe inspiring Khumbu Icefall, followed by a trip to the plateau of the Western Cwm, for our first glimpse of Camp 1, at 5,800 metres/19,000 feet. We return to basecamp for a tasty dinner, prepared by our skilled cooks. back to top

Team members crossing a ladder over a deep crevasse in the interesting Khumbu Icefall. Rope and ladders are expertly fixed and maintained through the maze of shifting glacial seracs (Bruce Manning). Members wave in the Western Cwm between camp 1 and camp 2 (Dan Mazur).

High Camps-

Through the following days, we will climb up and down the mountain, exploring the route, establishing camps, and carefully and safely building our acclimatization level.

From camp 1 at 6,000 metres/19,700 feet, the route traverses the flattish bottom of the Western Cwm, to 6,200 metres/20,300 feet where camp 2 is located.

Camp 3 is on the head wall of the Lhotse face at about 7300 metres/24,00 feet. To reach camp 3, we must negotiate the Lhotse Face. The Lhotse face is a steep, shiny icy wall. The face itself is not extremely technical, but is arduous considering the altitude increase. It gets less difficult as acclimation continues through the weeks going up and down between camps. back to top

Team members ascending the Lhotse Face. Our comfortable camp 3. The spectacular view from camp 3. (Sam Mansikka)

 

Going Home-

After packing up all of your equipment, supplies, and rubbish, you will make the return trek to Lukla. The following morning, you are up early, and fly back to Kathmandu, where you can enjoy a hot shower and a grand Nepalese western-style feast. In Kathmandu, you can have a day to relax, celebrate, tour the valley, write postcards, and do a bit more shopping, before heading home. We hope you had a safe, enjoyable, and successful adventure. Thanks for joining in! back to top

Thank You for joining our Everest Camp 3 Training Climb Expedition.

SummitClimb Mount Everest Nepal Camp 3 Training Reviews, Testimonials, Complaints, and Comments

Please scroll down to read our testimonial:

Here is what Cat says:

Just landed in Dubai and waiting to fly out through Seattle on the way back to AZ. Just wanted to say how grateful I am to have been a part of the Nepal Everest team. Please send everyone my warmest regards. Looking forward to climbing with you guys soon

Here is what Magnus Says:

On Thursday, I finally got home and I have to say that the ‘re-entry’ has been rough – between jetlag, lots of emails and everything that piled up over the last month. I miss the simplicity of life in the mountains and the comradery with the team. Of course, having clean clothes, a shower and different food are also very nice.

I wanted to thank you for an AWESOME trip and for being so flexible and putting me on the Nepal trip within a few hours. This allowed me to still have a great trip and almost achieve my goal of reaching 7000m (if only it hadn’t been for the closure of the Lhotse face on my ‘summit’ day). I had a really good time and an amazing experience. It was fantastic to see what it’s like to climb the “big” mountains in the Himalayas…and the Khumbu icefall was something else all-together. I also can’t believe I spent a week above 6000m.

I would like to thank the great SummitClimb team leader! Who gave us lots of freedom and super flexibility. Their many years of experience showed at every moment – from making sure we were safe on the mountain to the schedule/itinerary. I always felt in very good hands with the SummitClimb guides. You put together a great team with great people and an outstanding Sherpa team.

Please say ‘hi’ to everyone from me. I miss you guys and wish I could have stayed to climb to the top with you guys!

All the Best! Stay safe! Good luck to everyone! I’m rooting for you!!! - Magnus

Dan and Magnus in Camp 2. Mike Fairman Photo Everest Summit seen from the Western Cwm on a windy day. Mike Fairman Photo Les Binns from Yorkshire abseiling the face into the Khumbu Icefall, team members below. Mike Fairman Photo
 
Dan and Magnus in Camp 2. Mike Fairman Photo.  Everest Summit seen from the Western Cwm on a windy day. Mike Fairman Photo. Les Binns from Yorkshire abseiling the face into the Khumbu Icefall, team members below. Mike Fairman Photo

Here is what Mario says:

I was one of the Nepal Camp 3 training climbers. You might remember we chatted about many things in the kitchen tent at Camp 2.  Congratulations on getting everyone to the top! That's unheard of.

I'd like to be helpful and offer some constructive criticism about the organisation of the trip but I actually have very little in the way of negative comments.  A very satisfied customer.

- Your office was very effective, helping me join the trip at very late notice.

- I thought your office in Kathmandu was above and beyond the level of service I'd expect - they were helpful to the point I felt like I was taking advantage of their good nature at times. They just did everything that was asked and more.

- The Sherpa guide was great, very attentive and showed a real care for us that differentiated his performance from competent to exceptional.

- I thought the base camp facilities were adequate and the staff responsive to anything we needed. I thought the food was good considering the circumstances. How do you cook pizza for 15 in a tent!?!

- I've not been on many on many Everest expeditions (well, just this one actually... haha...) but I suspect most don't have the leader's unique personal approach which gives the whole operation another dimension.  If you'd ask me who I would expect as expedition leader on Everest, I'm glad you are running the show.

That's about it really.  I would really like to come back and try for the top one day, if you'll have me. Certainly interested to hear any thoughts on the idea.

Anyway, thanks for taking the time to reach out.  I hope my comments are helpful, even if they are a little light on suggestions.  Hopefully not the last time we talk - look forward to hearing from you soon.

Mario

Team walking in the Western Cwm at the base of the Lhotse face. Monika Witkowska photo Thile Nuru Sherpa ascends a vertical ladder in the Khumbu Icefall. Monika Witkowska Photo

Team walking in the Western Cwm at the base of the Lhotse face. Monika Witkowska photo. Thile Nuru Sherpa ascends a vertical ladder in the Khumbu Icefall. Monika Witkowska Photo
 
If you would like to contact our previous members, please send an email to info@summitclimb.com

We take our member's feedback and testimonials seriously. These help us to refine and make our trips a successful, safe, and enjoyable experience for our future teams.

What our clients say?

  • Here is what Magnus Says:

    On Thursday, I finally got home and I have to say that the ‘re-entry’ has been rough – between jetlag, lots of emails and everything that piled up over the last month. I miss the simplicity of life in the mountains and the comradery with the team. Of course, having clean clothes, a shower and different food are also very nice.

    I wanted to thank you for an AWESOME trip and for being so flexible and putting me on the Nepal trip within a few hours. This allowed me to still have a great trip and almost achieve my goal of reaching 7000m (if only it hadn’t been for the closure of the Lhotse face on my ‘summit’ day). I had a really good time and an amazing experience. It was fantastic to see what it’s like to climb the “big” mountains in the Himalayas…and the Khumbu icefall was something else all-together. I also can’t believe I spent a week above 6000m.

    I would like to thank the great SummitClimb team leader! Who gave us lots of freedom and super flexibility. Their many years of experience showed at every moment – from making sure we were safe on the mountain to the schedule/itinerary. I always felt in very good hands with the SummitClimb guides. You put together a great team with great people and an outstanding Sherpa team.

    Please say ‘hi’ to everyone from me. I miss you guys and wish I could have stayed to climb to the top with you guys!

    All the Best! Stay safe! Good luck to everyone! I’m rooting for you!!! - Magnus

  • Here is what Cat says:

    Just landed in Dubai and waiting to fly out through Seattle on the way back to AZ. Just wanted to say how grateful I am to have been a part of the Nepal Everest team. Please send everyone my warmest regards. Looking forward to climbing with you guys soon

  • Here is what Mario says:

    I was one of the Nepal Camp 3 training climbers. You might remember we chatted about many things in the kitchen tent at Camp 2.  Congratulations on getting everyone to the top! That's unheard of. 

    I'd like to be helpful and offer some constructive criticism about the organisation of the trip but I actually have very little in the way of negative comments.  A very satisfied customer. 

    - Your office was very effective, helping me join the trip at very late notice. 

    - I thought your office in Kathmandu was above and beyond the level of service I'd expect - they were helpful to the point I felt like I was taking advantage of their good nature at times. They just did everything that was asked and more.

    - The Sherpa guide was great, very attentive and showed a real care for us that differentiated his performance from competent to exceptional. 

    - I thought the base camp facilities were adequate and the staff responsive to anything we needed. I thought the food was good considering the circumstances. How do you cook pizza for 15 in a tent!?!

    - I've not been on many on many Everest expeditions (well, just this one actually... haha...) but I suspect most don't have the leader's unique personal approach which gives the whole operation another dimension.  If you'd ask me who I would expect as expedition leader on Everest, I'm glad you are running the show.

    That's about it really.  I would really like to come back and try for the top one day, if you'll have me. Certainly interested to hear any thoughts on the idea.

    Anyway, thanks for taking the time to reach out.  I hope my comments are helpful, even if they are a little light on suggestions.  Hopefully not the last time we talk - look forward to hearing from you soon.

    Mario