UK: +44 (0)7810 375400 & USA: +1 360-570-0715 info@summitclimb.com
UK: +44 (0)7810 375400 & USA: +1 360-570-0715

Mt. Everest Climbing Expedition in Tibet via Northside Route

  • summitclimb everest photos Mount Everest as seen from Chinese Base Camp. Photo - Franz
  • summitclimb everest photos Mia Graeffe, the first Finnish woman to summit Everest from Tibet. Photo – Mia Graeffe.
  • summitclimb everest photos Lim Boem and Tenji Sherpa at camp 3. Photo - Dan
  • summitclimb everest photos The famous Second Step. Photo – David
  • everest tibet climb Climbers summiting Everest from the North Side. Photo - Frank
  • summitclimb everest photos Climbing to camp 3. Photo - David
  • summitclimb everest photos Members on the fixed lines near camp 1. Photo - Frank
  • everest tibet climbing expedition Members at Advanced Base Camp during puja ceremony. Photo - Scott
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  • Climb the uncrowded Tibet North Col route made famous by possible 1924 summit of Mallory and Irvine.

  • Full Service Cost: $41,700, £32,350, €37,850; Basic Climb Cost: $32,000, £24,850, €29,050. (Price fixed in $USD. £GBP and €EUR price for convenience only, converted November 27, 2019)

  • Dates: 6 April to 4 June 2021. 60 days in Tibet & Nepal (call for custom dates)

  • Add an exotic and historical trip to the ancient Tibetan city of Lhasa. Optional trip to Lhasa, add $2,450.

  • Leader David O'Brien from UK has led 5 Everest expeditions. David is friendly, organized, and a good teacher.

 

 

Everest Death Zone and Everest Tibet Summit Night By Brendan Madden, In Deep Films You Tube Channel and InDeepFilms.com.

Recent News:  Please click here to view news of our expedition. We only have a few places left in the team for next season. Please conact us now to book: info@summitclimb.com . Please also view our "Archived News" for more stories of past trips.
  

Overview:

Mount Everest at 8,848 meters (29,035 feet) is perhaps the most coveted mountain in the world.Climb the less crowded Tibet North Col route made famous byfirst attempt to climb Everest by Mallory and Irvine in 1924. This climb avoids theKhumbu Icefall and long approach hike of the south side. The North side is approached by a drive to basecamp across Tibetan plateau that includes the best views of Everest.

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Mount Everest Tibet Expedition Climb Cost | SummitClimb

Our full-service expedition includes:

What is not included?

Our basic climb includes:

  • British, European, or American leader
  • All permit fees and liaison officer
  • Basecamp meals; basecamp sleeping tent, basecamp dining tent, and tables and chairs
  • Transport to base camp to/from Kathmandu, for you and personal equipment only (boots, ice axe, clothing, sleeping bag), including accommodation and meals on the road
  • Yak transport of personal equipment to advanced base camp
  • A walkie-talkie radio
  • Emergency equipment and supplies
  • Access to team fixed ropes and camps (sites, not tents)
  • Airport transfers
  • Two nights stay in a Kathmandu hotel on arrival and two nights prior to departure in a double room. Private rooms are available for a small additional fee.
  • Other services and may be purchased and hired at minimal expense

Add on High Attitude Support : Click here for prices

  • Private Sherpa (personal guide/porter) – Carries up to 10 kg (22bs) of your personal equipment, climbs with you, melts water, cooks, and will be with you every step of the way.
  • Personal equipment carriage service – Sherpa carry up to 10kg (22lbs) of personal equipment up and down the mountain between camps
everest tibet
The Famous Second Step and Third Step. Photo Jürgen L.

Mount Everest Tibet Expedition Climb Itinerary | SummitClimb

1) Arrive in Kathmandu, 1350 meters (4,429 feet). Go to hotel

2) Kathmandu – Go to Chinese embassy for visa, team orientation meeting, purchasing, packing, visit temples, city tour, shopping. Stay at hotel.

3) Early morning drive to Rusuwaghadi at 2557 meters (8,389 feet). Stay at hotel.

Lhasa option: Fly from Kathmandu to Lhasa or if you are coming from a city in China, arrive in Lhasa on this day.

4) Enter Tibet, drive to Gyirong at 2700 meters (8,858 feet) Stay at hotel.


Lhasa option: Rest in Lhasa, tour Potala Palace and Jokhang Temple, the most sacred building in all of Tibet.


5) Rest and acclimatization in Gyirong. Walk around the local hills. Stay at hotel.


Lhasa option: Drive to Shigatse. Rest and acclimate. Tour the surrounding area. Visit the 15th century Tashilunpo Monastery, the largest active monastic institution in Tibet.


6) Drive to Tingri, 4300 meters 14,108 feet. Stay at hotel.


Lhasa option: Drive to Tingri. Rest and acclimate, tour the surrounding area.


7) Rest & acclimatization in Tingri. Explore surrounding hills and beautiful meadows. See the restoration of the historical Buddhist temples. Stay at hotel.


8) Drive to Chinese basecamp, 5200 meters (17,060 feet). Camp.


9) Rest and acclimatization in Chinese base. Organize equipment and supplies.


10) Acclimatization hike near Chinese base. Meet the Lama and participate in a Puja ceremony.


11) Rest & acclimatization in Chinese base. Organize equipment and supplies.


12) Walk with the yaks halfway to interim camp, 5800 meters (19,029 feet).


13) Rest and acclimatization at interim camp.


14) Rest and acclimatization in interim camp.


15) Walk with the yaks to advanced base camp (ABC) at 6400 meters (20,9997 feet).


16) Training/rest day in ABC.


17) Training/rest day in ABC.


18) Climb partway up the North Col and return, camp in ABC.


19) Climb to the top of the North Col 7,000 meters (22,966 feet). Return to ABC.


20) Extra day in case of weather, acclimatization, etc.


21) Walk down to Basecamp.


22) Rest in Chinese base.


23) Rest in Chinese base.


24) Rest in Chinese base.


25) Climb to interim camp.


26) Climb to ABC.


27) Rest in ABC


28) Walk to camp 1. Sleep there.


29) Climb to camp 2, return to ABC.


30) Walk down to Basecamp.


31) Rest in Chinese base or drive to a lower village


32) Lower village. Explore historical temples and light hiking.


33) Rest in lower village.


34) Rest in lower village.


35) Lower village. Explore historical temples and light hiking.


36) Go back to Chinese base and rest.


37) Climb to interim camp.


38) Climb to ABC.


39) Rest in ABC.


40) Climb to camp 1. Sleep there.


41) Climb to camp 2, sleep there.


42) Climb to camp 3, sleep there.


43) Attempt summit if conditions allow.


44) Extra day for summit attempt.


45) Extra day for summit attempt.


46) Extra day for summit attempt.


47) Extra day for summit attempt.


48) Extra day for summit attempt.


49) Extra day for summit attempt.


50) Extra day for summit attempt.


51) Extra day for summit attempt.


52) Descend to Camp 1.


53) Descend to ABC.


54) Packing in ABC.


55) Walk to Chinese Base.


56) Packing in basecamp.


57) Early morning drive to Gyirong. Stay at hotel.


58) Early morning drive to Kathmandu. Stay at hotel.


59) In Kathmandu. Final packing, celebration, and say goodbye to new friends.


60) Fly home. Thank you for joining our Mount Everest Expedition

Mount Everest Tibet Expedition Climb Leadership & Staff | SummitClimb

Leadership: During your full-service expedition, you will benefit from the leadership provided by David O'Brien . David has climbed in the Indian and Nepalese Himalayas as well as in the Alps. He has led expeditions in the high arctic island of Spitsbergen and has a liking for the cold and remote having crossed Greenland by ski. He has organized and led overland trips in Asia and North Africa.

David has been climbing and working with Summit Climb since 2006 and is a thoughtful, considerate leader. He is a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society and lives in London with his partner and child.

Sherpas: We employ some of Nepal, Tibet, and the Karakorum’s best local mountaineers and Sherpas to assist team members in realizing their summit goals. Our friendly and loyal high altitude climbing staff has supported teams to the summits of more than ten of the highest peaks in the Himalaya.

Mount Everest Tibet Your Experience & Training | SummitClimb

Winter snow walking experience and experience at high altitude is highly recommended. The trip includes brief climbing clinics. We will teach you everything you need to know on a glacier near basecamp. To be successful, proper conditioning is critical to your success on Everest. Team members are expected to be very fit and in good health. Proper training with a focus on long hikes carrying a backpack is essential.

Mount Everest Tibet Climb Personal & Team Equipment | SummitClimb

Climbing:

  • Climbing harness
  • 5 meters (16 ft.) of 6mm accessory cord
  • Figure 8 abseil/belay device (tube style devices, i.e. ATC will not work on fixed lines)
  • Full size ascender (i.e. PetzlAscention)
  • 2 locking carabiners, 1 large and 1 small
  • 4 non-locking carabiners
  • Ice axe with leash
  • Steel crampons with anti-balling plates
  • Trekking poles
  • Abseiling/Rappelling Gloves

Upper Body:

  • 2 cotton t-shirts
  • 2 synthetic t-shirts
  • 2 long sleeve synthetic shirts
  • Light-weight soft shell jacket
  • Medium weight insulatingjacket (fleece, down, or synthetic)
  • Hard shell jacket with hood, waterproof and breathable (Gore-Tex or similar)
  • Heavy down coat

    • For 6,000m peaks a very warm down coat with hood or an 8,000m coat with hood
    • For 7,000m peaks an 8,000m coat with hood
    • For 8,000m peaks an 8,000m down coat with hood or an 8,000m suit can be used instead

Hands:

  • Lightweight poly-liner gloves
  • Mid-weight soft shell gloves – water/wind resistant
  • Heavy- weight waterproof gloves – Gore-tex shell with removable liner
  • Expedition weight mittens -Gore-tex over mitt matched polar fleece mitt liner

Head:

  • Helmet
  • Warm hat that covers your ears
  • Balaclava
  • Face mask
  • Baseball hat or brimmed sun hat
  • Glacier sunglasses with side shields
  • Ski goggles with light and dark lenses
  • Headlamp with extra batteries and bulbs
  • Buff/neck gaiter
  • Bandana or head scarf (optional)

Lower Body:

  • Synthetic underwear
  • Hiking shorts
  • Hiking pants
  • 2 pair lightweight thermal bottoms
  • Medium or expedition weight thermal bottoms
  • Polar fleece or soft shell pants
  • Waterproof/breathable pants with full side zips (Gore-Tex or similar)
  • Heavy insulating pants

    • For 6,000m peaks: Down or synthetic pants will full zips
    • For 7,000m peaks: 8,000m down pants
    • For 8,000m peaks: 8,000m down pants or a 8,000m suit can be used instead

Feet:

  • Boots

    • For 6,000m peaks: Plastic or composite double boots (Koflach, La SportivaSpantik, etc) Modern waterproof, single boots designed for 4-5,000m peaks may be suitable if they can be worn with 2 pairs of socks and vapor barrier lines and/or they are equipped with overboots
    • For 7,000m: Plastic or composite double boots (Koflach, La SportivaSpantik, etc)
    • For 8,000m peaks: 8,000m boots - One-Sport Millet Everest boots or equivalent

  • Sturdy leather walking boots
  • Trainers, running shoes and/or sandals
  • Down booties (optional)
  • 3 pair med-heavy poly or wool socks
  • 2 pair poly or wool liner socks (optional)
  • Vapor barrier liner socks (optional)
  • 2 pair lightweight trekking socks
  • Cotton socks for in town

Sleeping:

  • Down sleeping bag

    • For 6,000m peaks: -18C or 0F
    • For 7,000m peaks:-23C or -10F (If you sleep cold consider -29C or -20F)
    • For 8,000m peaks: -29C or -20F (If you sleep cold consider -40C or -40F)

  • An additional down sleeping bag for basecamp for the following climbs: Everest, Lhotse, AmaDablam, Manaslu, Cho Oyu, Shishapangma, Broad Peak, K2, Gasherbrum I and II, Spantik, K2/Broad Peak Everest training climb. For Mastagata a second sleeping bag is optional, but highly recommended.

    • Down base camp sleeping bag should be rated to -10C or 15F (If you sleep cold consider -18C or 0F)

  • 2 closed cell foam kari-mats (sleeping pads) for use in basecamp and high altitude (these can be purchased inexpensively in Kathmandu)
  • High quality inflatable sleeping pad designed for cold weather (Thermarest)
  • Patch kit for inflatable pad

Rucksack and Travel Bags:

  • Medium rucksack/backpack (50-70 litres / 3000-4500 cubic inches, can be used as carry-on bag)
  • Waterproof rucksack cover (optional)
  • 2 large (120+ L / 7500+ cubic inch) duffle kit bags for clothing and equipment
  • Small luggage locks for duffel kit bags

Personal Hygiene:

  • Female or male hygiene supplies
  • 2 tubes lip sun cream
  • Large tube skin sun cream (min factor 30)
  • Anti-mosquito cream
  • Toothpaste/brush
  • Hand sanitizer gel (small-medium bottle)
  • Bar of soap small towel
  • Hand wipes

Medical:

  • Small personal first-aid kit. (Simple and Light) Aspirin, first-aid tape, plasters (band-aids), personal medications, etc.
  • Blister repair kit
  • 10 anti-diarrhea pills
  • 20 anti-headache pills
  • 10 cough and/or cold medicine
  • Anti-altitude sickness pills: Diamox, Acetylzolamide (optional)
  • 10 Stomach antibiotics: Ciprofloxacin, etc.
  • 5 Azithomycine tables
  • Steri pen or bottle of water purification tablets
  • Cough sweets/lozenges (Halls/Stepils)
  • Earplugs
  • Extra prescription glasses/contact lenses and supplies

Personal Food:

  • Snack food/daily energy food

    • Everest training Nepal/Tibet, AmaDablam, Baruntse: 2-4kg (4.5-9lbs)
    • Spantik, Cho Oyu, Shishapangma, Mustagata, Manasu: 2-5kg (4.5-11lbs)
    • Broad Peak, K2, Gasherbrum I/II, K2/Everest training, Everest, Lhotse: 3-6kg (6.5-13lbs)

  • Dehydrated meals (freeze-dried dinners) for summit attempt

    • Everest training Nepal/Tibet, AmaDablam: 2 meals
    • Spantik, Cho Oyu, Shishapangma, Mustagata, Manasu, Baruntse: 3 meals
    • Broad Peak, K2, Gasherbrum I/II, K2/Everest training, Everest, Lhotse: 5 meals
Practical:

  • Small roll of repair tape
  • Sewing repair kit
  • Cigarette lighter
  • Small box matches
  • Compass or GPS
  • Battery powered alarm clock/watch
  • Camera with extra cards and extra batteries
  • Nylon stuff sacks for food and gear storage
  • 2 water bottles (1 litre) wide-mouth Nalgene
  • Pee bottle (1litre or larger)
  • Plastic cup and spoon
  • Small folding knife
  • Binoculars (optional)
  • 4 large, waterproof, disposable rubbish sacks
  • Passport, 2 extra passport photos, flight ticket, flight itinerary
  • Separate photocopies of passport and relevant visa pages, proof of insurance
  • Dollars, pounds, or euros cash
  • Bank/ATM/Cash and credit cards
  • Bathing suit/swim suit (you never know)
  • Paperback books, playing cards, ipod/mp3 player, musical instruments, extra batteries, etc.
  • Travel clothes for basecamp and in town
  • Umbrella (optional)
  • Small solar panels for personal electronics (optional)


Group Equipment:

We provide group gear, equipment, and supplies including: rope, ice, rock, and snow anchor protection, tents; stoves, fuel, walkie-talkie radios, bamboo marker wands, etcetera. A personal tent will be provided for each member at base camp. On the upper mountain, team members will share tents. In base camp, a shower, toilet, solar charger, and a dining tent will be provided.

Mount Everest Tibet Expedition Climb Application | SummitClimb

Please fill out an application and return it to us with your refundable ten-percent deposit to hold your place on the team.


In addition to your application, we will need the following at least two months before the trip begins:
 

  • Completed Payment
  • Oxygen order (if any)
  • Sherpa order (if any)
  • Trip Registration form
  • 1 Passport sized photo
  • A scan of your passport identification pages
  • Complete flight itinerary
  • Proof of travel, accident, and repatriation insurance. We strongly recommend Global Rescue, with at least $50,000 worth of helicopter rescue insurance.
  • Trip cancellation/interruption insurance is recommended

Please contact us with any questions you may have.

everest north side
Camp 1. Photo Elyse P

Everest Tibet Programme Description

Please click one of the links below to view that section of our introductory information or just scroll down (Photo below right by Lakpa Sherpa: Team members on the summit. 9 members of our team reached the summit along with 16 of our world famous Sherpas). Team members on the summit. 9 members of our team reached the summit along with 16 of our world famous Sherpas

 

Everest Tibet Programme Description:

  • Introduction: Mount Everest at 8,848 metres / 29,035 feet is perhaps the most coveted mountain in the world. The north (Tibetan) side is the least expensive way to climb it, and the dates we have chosen feature the best weather of the year.
    • Our proposed schedule allows for a careful and safe ascent, as well as multiple full descents to Chinese basecamp and/or a lower village.
    • The style of climbing is cautious and careful, with excellent leadership, organization, Sherpa climbers, 'walkie-talkie' radios, satellite telephones, the best oxygen bottles and apparatus available,The second step at 8500 metres/27,900 feet. We fixed 300 metres/1000 feet of rope here cooks and waiters, tasty food, the best equipment, individual tents for each member in basecamp, two full kitchens in basecamp plus advanced basecamp (ABC), 3 camps on the mountain, 1000s of metres of fixed line, hundreds of rock, ice and snow anchors, top-quality high altitude tents and high altitude stoves, expedition mix gas, and full safety equipment: medical oxygen, gamow bag, and extensive medical kit (photo right by Jürgen Landmann: The second step at 8500 metres/27,900 feet. We fixed 300 metres/1000 feet of rope here).
    • This expedition maximizes experience gained over 11 prior Everest expeditions with a strong record of reaching the top of our world's highest peaks. In addition to more than 25 Himalayan expeditions we have an intimate knowledge of the Tibetan officials who regulate the permit system, liaison officers, sherpas, cooks, yak drivers, and hoteliers/restaurateurs. back to top
  • Leader and staff: During the drive, trek, in Chinese Base, ABC and on the climb, our experienced staff is with you all of the way. Our helpful climbing sherpas are some of the best. They are real high-altitude star-performers and very friendly. Our western leader is a highly experienced, friendly, and well-organized professional with multiple ascents of Everest. Our skillful basecamp and advanced basecamp cooks prepare delicious, fresh, tasty food and hot drinks at least 3 times a day.Dawa Sherpa assists Ken Stalter across a crevasse on the North Col
    • On trek: Our western leader, together with friendly and helpful sherpas, cooks and local people leading yak caravans carry all of your personal equipment, group equipment, and set up camp each day, prepare and serve delicious meals, so you can relax and enjoy the trek. You do not need to carry a heavy rucksack during the trek.
    • Our comfortable basecamp and ABC: Our cooks and waiters will serve you delicious meals in our heated dining tent (photo by Dan Mazur: Dawa Sherpa assists Ken Stalter across a crevasse on the North Col).
    • On the mountain: Our western leader and group sherpas will fix the route, set up the high camps and carry the group equipment, such as tents, stoves, etc. If you wish to help out, we welcome you to do so, otherwise just relax and focus on getting well acclimated and achieving your goals. You do not need to carry a heavy rucksack during the climb.
    • Sherpas: We have many group sherpas to help the team. For an additional expense, we can also provide personal sherpas and climbing-guides to individual members who wish to have their own private sherpa. We now encourage members who wish to have a lighter rucksack to hire a 1/4 of a sherpa to help with high altitude equipment transport, carrying your extra weight both up and down the mountain. For information about hiring a personal sherpa, please click here to learn more.

Camp 3 with the summit behind (Frank Irnich). David in climbing up, just about to reach Camp 3. Photo Martin. Summit of Everest by Urs. Photo Urs John and Edmond working on fix line to climb Northcol. Photo Katya.

Camp 3 with the summit behind (Frank Irnich). David in climbing up, just about to reach Camp 3. Photo Martin. Urs. Summit of Everest by Urs. Photo Urs. John and Edmond working on fix line to climb Northcol. Photo Katya.

  • Everest National Park: The park is situated among rolling, vast green (in May-June) short-grass and boulder strewn valleys leading up to the base of the mountain. The environment is beautiful and stark, inhabited with wild birds and animals. Upon reaching basecamp, you trek towards the mountain, where the vegetation changes to become more alpine and rocky, with the mountain looming upwards and the best views of Mt. Everest possible from this altitude, either in Tibet or Nepal. Plants in the park range from spruce, pine, a wide variety of evergreen trees, as well as coldbelt grasslands. Many precious animals inhabit Tibet, such as antelope, deer, fox, gazelles, yaks, and many species of birds. back to topPreparing our yak loads at Chinese basecamp at 5,200 meters/17,000 feet
  • Drive to basecamp: Our drive from Kathmandu, into Tibet and finally to basecamp is a relaxing and interesting adventure. We stop in medieval looking towns with dirt streets, experience Tibetan culture, while stopping to walk each day or so in the beautiful surrounding hills to acclimate to the rising altitude. It offers a great chance to encounter the vast Tibetan plateau and the surrounding Himalayan Giants. We end at Chinese base camp at 5200 metres/17,000 feet, which is located just near the ancient and active Rongbuk Monastery. Along the way we stay and eat at rustic hotels at the organizer's expense (Photo right by Ryan Waters: Preparing our yak loads at Chinese basecamp at 5,200 meters/17,000 feet. Chinese base camp is located just near the medieval and active Rongbuk Monastery. Our camp is comfortable for the few days we spend there, with a full kitchen and dining tent, where our cooks prepare 3 hot delicious meals a day. There is plenty to explore in the surrounding hills, as well as many international climbing teams to meet).
  • Lhasa option: If you wish to add on a tour of the ancient city of Lhasa before arriving at basecamp, this is easily arranged so please let us know. Most people will prefer to fly to Kathmandu first to take advantage of the excellent equipment shopping there, then fly to Lhasa. The price includes a spectacular flight from Kathmandu to Lhasa over the Mount Everest massif. Some people prefer to fly to Lhasa from another city in China and we can also assist you with these arrangements.

Ancient Rongbuk Monastery in front of Everest Marker commemorating Everest Elevation measurement in Base Camp Walking into the Potala Palace.  Elaborate incense burner in Shigatse

Ancient Rongbuk Monastery in front of Everest.  Marker commemorating Everest Elevation measurement in Base Camp.  Walking into the Potala Palace. Elaborate incense burner in Shigatse

  • Basecamp: Features your own private sleeping tent that will be all your own, not needing to be shared with anyone. Advanced basecamp tents are based on a sharing basis. We have comfortable, heated dining tents with tables and chairs where our cooks and waiters will serve you delicious meals.
  • Trek to advanced basecamp: A beautiful trek to the base of the highest peak in the world. This trek is very accomplishable by the average person who enjoys walking. Normally, you never step on snow and there is no climbing, only walking oAt ABC. Photo Diamon Pon.n moraine trails. From basecamp we trek up the amazing Rongbuk glacier, also known as the "Golden Highway", where there are gorgeous views of stunning peaks in the area, including Lakpa-Ri and all of its "Little Sisters", as well as Changtse and of course Everest. At 6,400 meters/21,000 feet, Advanced Basecamp (ABC) must be the highest basecamp in the world (Photo right by Photo Diamon Pon: Slightly above ABC, one of our Everest climbing expedition members is heading up to ascend the North Col, where camp 1 is located at 7000 metres/23,000 feet). back to top
  • Climbing to the high camps:
    • After ABC, Clip in to the fixed lines for a sloping glacier walk up to the North Col (camp 1) at 7000 metres/24,900 feet. There is one steep section of 50-80 degrees. North Col is a pass between the Everest North East Ridge and Changtse. There are incredible views here, looking towards Pumori in Nepal, as well as Lhakpa Ri.
    • From the North Col, we ascend the glacier and eventually the rocky north ridge to set up Camp 2 at around 7500-7800 metres/24,600 feet.
    • After camp 2 the trail traverses to the west and up the north face around and through a series of 30 degree gullies and slopes before reaching the site of Camp 3 at 8,300 metres/27,200 feet.Cloud plumes roll off the north face of Everest. You can see the daunting west ridge on the right hand skyline leading up to the face. ABC is in the center and just over the gravel moraine from where this picture was taken
  • Rest Days: We will be taking a lot of them throughout the expedition. In fact, we might even descend to a low village for three-four days to soak up the sunshine and thicker air before our final summit push. During your rest days we encourage you to concentrate on recovering, eating and drinking, to read, relax, listen to music and stroll around visiting other teams (photo right by Tunc Findik: Cloud plumes roll off the north face of Everest. You can see the daunting west ridge on the right hand skyline leading up to the face. ABC is in the center and just over the gravel moraine from where this picture was taken).
  • Summit attempt: From Camp 3, we will make our final summit push. Climbers must first make their way through three rock bands known as the first, second, and third steps. Step 2 in particular, is an exciting rock-buttress to ascend with the presence of an aluminum ladder placed by a Chinese team in 1975 and since repaired by a five-star commercial team. After surmounting the 3rd Step, the summit is ahead. Once above these steps, the final summit slopes (35 to 58 degrees) to the top. back to top
  • Who is this trip for?Climbers ascending the North Col at 6,800 metres/22,300 feet
    • We encourage men and women from around the world, of all ages to join us as an individual team member or with your own group, whether that is your spouse, partner, friends, sibling, clients, colleagues, etc. Most of our members join as individuals, our team dynamics work well, and we are able to build successful and safe groups that enjoy trekking, climbing, and traveling together.
    • You should have previous high altitude climbing experience (such as Cho Oyu Shishapangma, Lhotse, Mustagata, Ama Dablam, Denali, Aconcagua, Lhakpa Ri / North Col or other) (Photo Right by Fredrik Strang: Climbers ascending the North Col at 6,800 metres/22,300 feet).
    • To participate in this expedition you must be a very fit and active winter-walker-climber in good health. Prior to joining, please see your doctor and obtain the necessary permission and advice. back to top

      Tents are on the Northcol with the view of summit. Photo David Roeske. Tents are on camp 3. Photo David Roeske Team reaching Northcol. Photo David Roeske.

      Tents are on the Northcol with the view of summit. Photo David Roeske. Tents are on camp 3. Photo David Roeske. Team reaching Northcol. Photo David Roeske. .back to top

Interested? Please contact us: info@summitclimb.com

Please "click" one of the links on the column on the upper right of your screen under "Everest Tibet" to learn more about our expedition.

Mount Everest Tibet Expedition Climb Route Description | SummitClimb

Please click one of the links below to view that section for the route on Everest Tibet, or scroll down.

Introduction-

Everest is perhaps the most coveted mountain in the world. The north (Tibetan) side is the least expensive way to climb it, and the dates we have chosen feature the best weather of the year. Our proposed schedule allows for two possible summit attempts and two full descents to the Chinese basecamp at 5,200 metres/17,000 feet. Our style of climbing is cautious and careful, with excellent leadership, organization, Sherpa climbers, cooks and waiters, tasty food, the best equipment, two full kitchens and basecamp plus advanced basecamp, 6 camps on the mountain, 1000s of metres of fixed line, hundreds of rock ice and snow anchors, top-quality high altitude tents and high altitude stoves, expedition mix gas, and full safety equipment: medical oxygen, gamow bag, and extensive medical kit. back to top

This expedition to Everest maximizes many years of accumulated wisdom of the high Himalaya, a strong record of reaching the top of 8,000ers: Everest, K2, Kangchenjunga, Lhotse, Makalu, Cho-Oyu, Shishapangma, and many other 8,000 metre summits, in addition to more than 25 Himalayan expeditions, in all safety, along with an intimate knowledge of the Tibetan and Chinese officials who regulate the permit system. We have been running expeditions to Tibet since 1986, and we know all of the bureaucratic officials, liaison officers, yak drivers, and hoteliers/restaurateurs personally.

Itinerary-

The proposed itinerary allows enough time for proper acclimatization, rest days, and several returns to base camp, where the kitchen and base camp staff can look after all of your needs, and quell your appetite. The weather at this time of year is normally quite good and stable. However, we all know the global weather is changing, and in case of storms, you will note the proposed itinerary includes extra days as well. In previous expeditions, half of those who reached the summit needed every single "extra" day. back to top

Weather-

At low elevation, the temperatures can vary from 27°c to -7°c ( 80°f to 20°f). At higher elevations, the temperature can vary from 16°c to -23°c (60°f to -10°f). The wind is the most chilling factor, and can be quite variable, with everything from a flat calm, to hurricane force on the summit. There may be deep snow, heavy rains, mosquitoes in wet areas, blowing dust, burning heat, bright sunshine.

Arriving in Kathmandu-

The trip begins in the ancient and colorful city of Kathmandu (you could also start in Beijing). You stay in a comfortable, simple, clean, hot-water hotel, at minimal cost and sample some of the very reasonably-priced tasty Nepalese, Tibetan and Western-Style cuisine, available at the hundreds of local restaurants. During your free days in Kathmandu, while your Chinese visa is being processed, you shall finalize arrangements, purchase and hire the bits of equipment you might be missing at the hundreds of mountain-climbing and trekking equipment shops in the neighborhood (with low prices, as well), and take time out for trinket hunting, with suggested visits to explore the 17th century splendors of the Monkey Temple, the Durbar Square and old Kings Palace, as well as the ancient cities of Patan, and Bakhtapur. We also have several member and training sessions during these days, where our leaders spend time with you reviewing climbing techniques and equipment, going over medical and safety procedures, etcetera. If you are concerned about the altitude and have purchased Diamox (acetylzolamide), which is inexpensively available with no doctor's prescription in Kathmandu, this might be the time to begin taking it. back to top

Optional Tour of Lhasa-

Some members wish to add an optional trip to Lhasa before reaching basecamp. If this includes you, most members will fly to Kathmandu first, then to Lhasa. Some people prefer to fly to Lhasa from another city in China and we can also assist you with these arrangements. For those flying from Kathmandu, you take a 1 hour and 45 minute flight in a jet over Mt. Everest and the spine of the Himalaya, arriving in Tibet's capital city. In the past, we have had some fabulous views out of the plane windows during this flight. 

At 3650 metres/12,000 feet of elevation, Lhasa was established around 600 AD on the banks of the Brahmaputra River. The heart of the city is centered around the Jokhang Temple, the most sacred building in all of Tibet. Our simple hotel is not too far from the famous Potale palace, Jokhang palace and the renowned Barkhor Market, where you can shop for exotic handicrafts and religious art from all across Tibet, China, and Buddhist India.

After flying to Lhasa, upon arrival you will rest for 2 nights and one day. It's important that you use the rest day to get acclimated to the high altitude.

 

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Buddhist pilgrims from Amdo region circumambulating the Jokhang Temple in the Barkhor market. Photo: J. Otto.

It is a three day drive from Lhasa to basecamp. From Lhasa, you will set out in government cars across the Tibetan plateau to meet the rest of the team in Tingri, before reaching Everest basecamp.

The following morning after your day in Lhasa, you will drive to Shigatse at 3650 metres/12,000 feet, the second largest city in Tibet, with a famous Monastery. The road winds along the massive Brahmaputra River, past traditional warren-like Tibetan farm towns. In Shigatse, you can have a look around and try to visit the 15th century Tashilunpo Monastery, the largest active monastic institution in Tibet. Monks in maroon robes seem to be everywhere, going about their daily chores, praying, and practicing ceremonial music performances.

After Shigatse, you will make the scenic drive to the ancient city of Lhaze (Lhatse), at 4000 metres/13,100 feet . At the western end of town is the small Changmoche Monastery, which you may visit while there. You can see interesting views of the surrounding Tibetan plateaus and hills.

From Lhaze, it is another scenic drive to the town of Tingri at 4,342 meters/14,200 feet, where you will meet up with the rest of the team and continue towards Everest basecamp. back to top

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The Tashilunpo Monastery in Shigatse, where more than 700 monks live and worship in the Buddhist religion. (Photo: J. Otto)

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A Tibetan farmer brings his goods to market on the road near Lhaze. (Photo D.L. Mazur)

Driving to Basecamp-

After the finalization of your Chinese visa, early morning drive to Rusuwaghadi at 2557 metres, 8389 feet. We clear Nepalese customs and immigration, and then hire local porters and vehicles to carry your bags across broader.

Upon entering Tibet, the clocks immediately go forward by 2 ¼ hours. Our secondary government liaison officer will meet us in Gyirong. After clearing Tibetan customs and immigration, we will stay rest & acclimatization in Gyirong. Walk around the local hills. Hotel. back to top

Bouldering in Nyalam on our rest day (Felix Berg). On the road to Tingri, Himalayan Giants in the background (DL Mazur). Our sturdy Tibetan trucks carry the equipment, here being loaded by our Sherpas (Tim Spear).

In the morning we continue our bus-ascent into the Tibetan plateau, to the town of Tingri at 4,342 meters/14,200 feet. There are superb views of Shishapangma, Cho-Oyu, and Everest as we drive into Tingri. The town itself is a very basic one-street hamlet surrounded by the tents of nomadic Tibetans. About ½ of all ethnic Tibetans living in Tibet are nomadic or semi-nomadic. Our extremely rustic little hotel has an adequate restaurant, and it will be interesting to see if the high altitude has quelled our appetites for tasty fresh food. There are the ruins of an old fortress on a rise above town, and from here we can see the finest views of Everest, Lhotse, Cho-Oyu, and Shishipangma.

A stop along the road near Tingri. There is a simply developed hot springs here. Only the very brave are able to tempt fate by entering the dirty water(Bruce Manning). back to top

The following morning, after what for many is a relatively sleep-free night, we drive the 70 kilometers/40 miles, to Everest base camp at around 5,200 meters/17,000 feet. The drive follows a dirt road along the Rongbuk Valley and has spectacular views of the Himalaya. Chinese base camp is located just near the medieval and active Rongbuk Monastery.

We will spend another day resting, acclimatising, and organizing equipment into Yak loads at Chinese base.

Preparing our yak loads at Chinese basecamp (Bruce Manning). Blue mountain sheep in the cliffs above basecamp (Felix Berg). back to top

Moving to Advanced Basecamp-

We then spend two days moving up to the "interim camp", which is located at 5,800 metres/19,000 feet, and halfway to the "advanced basecamp (ABC)".

Yak train heading up to interim camp (Bruce Manning). Interim Camp at 5800 metres/19,000 feet, where we acclimate for a day or two before heading up to ABC (Tim Spear).

Next, we spend two days working our way up to ABC. 6,400 meters/21,000 feet, ABC must be the highest basecamp in the world. It is located on a rocky moraine next to the Rongbuk Glacier.

Franck walking up the Rongbuk to ABC (Tim Spear). Our comfortable ABC at 6400 metres/21,000 feet, A view of the mountain at sunset from ABC (Ryan Waters).

Upon reaching ABC, we will take another rest and acclimatization day, this time going over our equipment, safety procedures, climbing techniques, cooking and camping methods, and working to form ourselves into a more cohesive team. back to top

Climbing Everest-

After resting and completing our training, we will begin our climb of Everest.

Climbers approaching the North Col at 6800 metres/22,300 feet. Lines are fixed here for safety. Our tents at the North Col at 7000 metres, also known as camp 1. Climbers Walking up to the 7500 metre/24,600 feet, camp, also known as camp 2. You can see the tents in the North Col in the background (Ryan Waters). At the 7500 metre/24,600 feet, camp (Ken Stalter).

On the way up to camp 3 at 8300 metres/27,200 feet, which lies up and to the right in the photo (Ryan Waters). Camp 3. Andre Bredenkamp and Chris Drummond in Camp 3 (Franck Pitula).

Through the following weeks, we will climb up and down the mountain, according to the schedule suggested below, exploring the route, establishing camps, and building our acclimatization and strength levels. We will also descend to the Chinese basecamp several times, in order to rest well. Following the proposed itinerary below should give us the best chance to ascend in safety and maximize our opportunity to reach the summit during the "weather windows" which open in May. back to top

High Camps-

After ABC, there is a steep ice and rock climb up to North Col (Camp 1) at 7000 metres/23,000 feet. This is a pass between the Everest North East Ridge and Changtse at 7600 metres/24,900 feet.

To reach camp I, we ascend the glacier to the foot of the col where fixed ropes are used to reach the North Col at 7,000 metres/23,000 feet. From the North Col, we ascend the rocky north ridge to set up Camp 2 at around 7,500 metres/24,600 feet. The route goes up the north face through a series of gullies and steepens into down sloping slabby terrain before reaching the site of Camp 3 at 8,300 metres/27,200 feet.

Distant view of the second step at 8500 metres/27,900 feet, ladders on right (Franck Pitula). On the second step at 8500 metres/27,900 feet. We fixed 300 metres/1000 feet, of rope here. Looking at the summit from 8400 metres/27,550 feet. Climbing the second step. (Ryan Waters). back to top

Summit Day-

From Camp 3, we will make our final summit push. Climbers must first make their way through three rock bands known as the first, second, and third steps.

The first step is only about 3 metres located at 8,500 metres/28,000 feet. The second step is located just above the first step at 8,500 metres/28,000 feet, and is about 50 metres/160 feet, high. The third and final step is slightly further up from the second at 8,800 metres/28,870 feet, and is about 20 metres/60 feet, high.

Step 2 in particular, is exceptionally difficult to cross, even with the presence of an aluminum ladder placed by a Chinese team in 1975. After surmounting the 3rd Step, the summit is ahead. Once above these steps, the final summit slopes (50 to 60 degrees) to the top. The team must traverse the distance (about 1.5 km/1 mile) up and down within a single day. back to top

The third and final step onto the summit. Ryan on the Summit. (Ryan Waters). Franck Pitula on the summit. A sunburned Felix back in ABC after summitting.

Optional Everest Traverse-

We are very excited to be offering a traverse of Everest. There are two ways to do it, from Nepal to Tibet, and from Tibet to Nepal. We are able to offer both options as we have expeditions from both sides. If you are interested in doing this, please contact us as soon as possible.

From the summit, you will cross over and ascend the other side of Mt. Everest where camps will already be established from our Nepal expedition.

For more about the route coming down from the summit on the Nepal route, please click here. For more about the cost of doing the traverse from Tibet to Nepal, please click here.

A view of the famous Hillary Step coming down from the summit on the Nepal side (Fabrice Imparato).

Going Home-

After packing up all of your equipment, supplies, and rubbish, you will make a short return trek and drive to Tingri, have a feast at the restaurant and stay in the hotel. The following morning, you are up early, and drive all the way down to Gyirong, hire porters to carry everything over the Nepal Boarder, and then catch a bus into Kathmandu, where you can enjoy a hot shower and a grand Nepalese western-style feast. In Kathmandu, you can have a day to relax, celebrate, tour the valley, write postcards, and do a bit more shopping, before heading home. We hope you had a safe, enjoyable, and successful adventure. Thanks for joining in!   back to top

Thank You for joining our Everest Tibet Expedition.

SummitClimb Mount Everest Tibet Climb Reviews, Testimonials, Complaints, and Comments

Please scroll down for more testimonials 

Here is what Jack has to says:

One of the best life experiences I ever had. Thank you SummitClimb

Here is what Basia has to say:

Basia shared your video — feeling thankful.

I feel very grateful for the chance to experience both sides of Mt.Everest. These expeditions were with Summit Climb.

I had a thought this morning that if I had chosen a different company, I wouldn't have met my friend, great climber and an excellent personal sherpa - Sange Sherpa and I may not have had a chance to summit this amazing, big mountain this year. Thank you Dan and thank you Sange!! ---Basia

Basia Gorska at camp 3. Photo by Sange Sherpa. Our tents at the North Col at 7000 metres-23,000 feet, also known as camp 1. Photo David O Brien

Basia Gorska at camp 3 at Everest Nepal. Photo by Sange Sherpa. Our tents at the North Col at 7000 metres-23,000 feet, also known as camp 1. Photo David O Brien.



Here is what Rob has to say:

Nice to hear from you, and congratulations on another successful year on Everest. Great to see such a strong and safe performance from  the SummitClimb teams on both North and South.

All is well here thanks. I’m glad to report that my minor frostbite healed very quickly so I’m back to full health. Your office staff was very helpful bringing us to the clinic in Kathmandu.

I didn’t get to thank you in person, as I believe you were still trekking down from Everest Base Camp, but I’m very pleased to have climbed with SummitClimb again this year.

Keep in touch, Rob


 
 
Elyse summit mount Everest with Sherpas. Photo Elyse Ping. Ang Pasang and Rob are on the summit of Everest. Photo Rob Mortell

Here’s what Steve has to say:

Firstly I had one of the best experiences of my life, thank you

  1. What was good about your expedition - : Almost everything especially when things where not going to plan. The leader made things work out and went the extra mile on so many occasions

  2. What can we do better? - : I really cannot think of a single thing. 10 out of 10 from me

  3. What advice would you give someone thinking of joining us in the future? - : Do it and be flexible things always worked out in the end
  
 
About to reach summit of Everest from Northside. Photo David O Brien. The famous second step. Photo Jürgen Landmann.  Very near to summit. Photo Jürgen Landmann

Here is what Leifur says:

Hi Dan

Thanks for the Everest - Tibet climb.  It went well and the leader did a good job. The Sherpa did extra well. He is strong and service minded. It was a pleasure climbing with him. 

I purchased extra oxygen for the climb (beyond the five bottles already included in the cost).

I was feeling strong on the summit climb and started on 1.5 litres flow, increasing it to 3 on the steep steps.  With only 12 hours round trip I had plenty of O2 and left a full unused bottle in camp 3 knowing that the other
O2 would be appreciated.   

I have no complaints but if there is part of the cost of the unused Oxygen
bottle paid back it would be well appreciated.   

Regards, Leifur
Back to top

Rikke climbing up to Camp 2. Photo Martin Climbing up to Camp 2. Photo Chris Bailley

Rikke climbing up to Camp 2. Photo Martin. Climbing up to Camp 2. Photo Chris Bailley.

 Here is what Alan from California says:

"I had a very good experience on this unforgettable expedition. The trip was well organized and I liked the leader. He was full of energy and humour."

Here is what Troy says:

"Thanks for everything! I appreciate everything you did to make this a safe and successful expedition."

Jacques Puyo:

I was there! Summit Climb brought me to the Top under the leadership of Dan. This expedition was not only extremely well organized (all these important details taken care of for you, so that you can concentrate on your inner voyage...and focus on the goal), but we also had lots of excellent food (I am French :-)), as well as fantastic people interactions. If you have a chance: go with Summit Climb, these guys are smashing. 

Summit Everest. At Everest ABC. Photo Jacques Puyu

Here is what Bruce says:

"I thought the expedition worked well and it was another good group of people you put together. I look forward to climbing together again and seeing you next time." Back to top

Members are descending after summit. Photo Chris Bailley Summit View. Photo Rikke

We used fixed rope. Photo Chris Bailley . Summit View. Photo Rikke 

Here is what Phil has to say:

"The expedition is ideal for individuals or groups of climbers who wish to participate in a Himalayan expedition at a reasonable price. The price is only slightly higher than the cost of organizing your own independent expedition. You have the wealth of experience provided by the organizers and land leaders, who use no middlemen, dealing directly with the government mountaineering office.

Allows a member to experience the Himalayas a little bit as the first pioneer climbers did when there was no such thing as commercial expeditions. Some climbers without the contacts and knowledge to organize their own trip will enjoy how all logistics are taken care of by professionals, from your arrival at the airport to your departure from the staging city.

All group equipment and oxygen used is of the finest quality and replaced on a frequent basis. Leaders are professional climbers, there to assist the members and give advice rather than just dragging someone to the summit and down. The western leaders and local Nepalese and Tibetan Sherpas are some of the best, season after season.

The style of expedition is structured but relaxed with all team members having a say in the day to day running of the trip, although the leaders have the final decision on issues that effect the safety of the team. Of course, some people will prefer to pay the higher prices asked by some of the professional guiding companies.

The expedition provides similar high mountain and base camp food and equipment as the higher priced companies, and especially pride themselves on the training of the Nepalese and Tibetan sherpas in technical climbing, and assisting the members in every way. The kitchen staff are diligent in their tasty food production, preparing plenty of hot drinks, and hygiene practices.

You come home after the expedition with a sense of achievement and friendship. You have been a team member in an expedition rather than a guided client." Back to top

Chris Bailley using ladder to ascent while Martin taking a picture of him. Photo Rikke. Chris Bailley carefully climbing up. Photo Rikke.

Chris Bailley using ladder to ascent while Martin taking a picture of him. Photo Rikke. Chris Bailley carefully climbing up. Photo Rikke.

Here is what Arnold has to say about climbing Everest from Tibet: 

  • "It’s a full service expedition with everything taken care of. Or you can go in simple style with the basic climb.
  • Its cheaper than the South side expedition.
  • It involves some very interesting history of Mallory and Irvine and the 1920s expeditions.
  • SummitClimb's strong team has fixed the route to the summit two years in a row.
  • It's less of a circus atmosphere.
  • There is a nice slow pace of approach and climb.
  • The challenging and breathtaking trek to ABC along the "miracle highway" has been referred to as "like crossing the moon".
  • There are many rest periods at low altitude villages between forays to the cold and windy heights. It keeps you strong.
  • Our leaders are very team focused, dedicated and hard working, with attention to the member's needs and details.
  • Our teams are focused on letting each member go at his/her own pace with support from our leaders and sherpas.
  • We have excellent staff and Sherpas.
  • The basecamp food is excellent with plenty of hot drinks.
  • Our equipment is strong and plentiful.
  • The Tibetan side of Everest might be shorter to climb, you start from a high ABC at 6400 metres.
  • The summit day is shorter, starting from 8300 metre high camp, 300 metres higher than high camp on the Nepal side." Back to top

Here is what Garth had to say:

"Good that we are all back safe and sound, well done to you! I had a fantastic time out in Tibet, what an incredible experience. Jon, the Prentice Brothers and myself left Tibet saying that we would return" 

Our comfortable Chinese base camp. Photo Rares Voda Clear view of Mount Everest from Chinese base camp. Photo Rares Voda
 
Our comfortable Chinese base camp. Clear view of Mount Everest from Chinese base camp. Photo Rares Voda. Back to top

Here is what Frank had to say:

1. The leader was a nice excellent leader with a very good weather forecast page.

2. The kitchen crew did an excellent job, food was very good in all camps!

3. The 4 sherpas made a great job, tents and oxygen were ready and at the right place at the right time.

4. The tents and equipment were very good. We had single tents for all members in BC and upper camps!
Back to top

If you would like to contact our previous members, please send an email to info@summitclimb.com

We take our member's feedback and testimonials seriously. These help us to refine and make our Everest Tibet expeditions a successful, safe, and enjoyable experience for our future teams.

Mount Everest Tibet Climbing Expedition Questions Section | Summitclimb

What our clients say?

  • Here is what Alan says:

    "I had a very good experience on this unforgettable expedition. The trip was well organized and I liked the leader. He was full of energy and humour."

  • Here is what Troy says:

    "Thanks for everything! I appreciate everything you did to make this a safe and successful expedition."

  • Here is what Bruce says:

    "I thought the expedition worked well and it was another good group of people you put together. I look forward to climbing together again and seeing you next time."

    Here is what Rob had to say:

    "Your good relationship with the Chinese government. allowed for us to get into Tibet earlier than any other international expedition.

    SummitClimb provided an excellent expedition leader. I think the food was fresh and really good, considering how difficult it is to get supplies up the mountain. Having our own tents in base camp and ABC was also a bonus."

    Here is what Garth had to say:
    "I had a fantastic time, what an incredible experience. We all left Tibet saying that we would return"

    Here is what Phil has to say:

    "The expedition is ideal for individuals or groups of climbers who wish to participate in a Himalayan expedition at a reasonable price, only slightly higher than the cost of organizing your own independent expedition.You have the wealth of experience provided by the organizers and land leaders, who use no middlemen, dealing directly with the government mountaineering office."

  • Here is what Dale has to say:

    "I just want to say "thanks" for organizing this expedition. I was able to achieve my childhood dream/goal of reaching the summit of Mt. Everest, and SummitClimb was a big factor in that dream becoming a reality." 

  • Here is what Arnold has to say about climbing Everest from Tibet:

    "It’s a full service expedition with everything taken care of. Or you can go in simple style with the basic climb. It's less expensive than the South side expedition.

    It involves some very interesting history of Mallory and Irvine and the 1920s expeditions.

    SummitClimb's strong team of staff and sherpas has helped fix the route to the summit many years now and they know the mountain well.

    It's less crowded than the South side and there is a nice slow pace of approach and climb.

    The leaders are very team focused, dedicated and hard working, with attention to the member's needs and details letting each participant go at his/her own pace with their own desired support.

    The basecamp food is excellent with plenty of hot drinks.

    The Tibetan side of Everest might be shorter to climb, you start from a high ABC at 6400 metres. The summit day is shorter, starting from 8300 metre high camp, 300 metres higher than high camp on the Nepal side."

     

  • Here is what Amer had to say:

    "Please know that i am truly delighted and 100% satisfied with my SummitClimb experience! Everything went smoothly so far as the organization goes, and i am grateful to have been a part of the team."

  • Here is what Vik had to say:

    "The leader provided great team leadership and is a very good communicator, clear and patient. I liked the independence afforded on the expedition and we had a good team. The solar charger and battery setup in basecamp worked well and the double wall dining tent and heater were nice. The sherpas were very hard working and super friendly. There were no slackers on the staff."

  • Here is what the Mallorys, a family of 4 Everest summiters, had to say:

    "SummitClimb is very patient and well organized. On expedition the showers were nice, the toilet facilities were good, tent arrangements were comfortable, the food servers were great, the food was tasty, and we even had heaters in basecamp and doctors on the trip.

    The organization was well done and we had very little concerns, with all of our requirements were met. We had a great climb with a huge deal of success.

    The SummitClimb Sherpas were very supportive, capable and helped us at important times when we needed their assistance. Preparation for the climb was made easy, with all of the important information available on the SummitClimb website. Questions were readily answered rapidly by the SummitClimb office staff. Most importantly, the leader was very professional, respectful, communicated information readily, and was a key component in the success we enjoyed on Everest"