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Mount Aconcagua 7 Summit Climbing Expedition

  • aconcagua Michael Tomordy and the South Face inter - Photo Max
  • aconcagua climb Approaching Camp 1 - Plaza Canada - Max Kausch
  • aconcagua expedition Michael Tomordy and an army expedition - Thomas Pfiffer
  • aconcagua climbing View of Camp 3 6000m / 18500ft - Photo Thomas Pfiffer
  • aconcagua trekking Michael Tomordy at Aconcagua Provincial Park entry - Max Kausch
  • aconcagua photos Having pizza at 3400m - Max Kausch
  • aconcagua mountain Looking at the South Piramid - Max Kausch
  • aconcagua photos Independencia Hut at 6400m / 19,000 ft - Photo Max Kausch
  • aconcagua photos Trekking to Confluencia - Photo Max Kausch
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  • Dates: 28 Dec. 2017 until 13 Jan. 2018, 18 Jan. 2018 until 03 Feb. 2018, 08 Feb. 2018 until 24 Feb. 2018.
  • Full Service, Cost: $4,350 , £3,390, € 3,650. Basic cost $2850. £2,150, € 2,400
  • * NEW OPTION: climb Plata 5950m and then Aconcagua in January 2018 Date: 12 Jan 2018 until 03 Feb 2018 (18 days). Price: U$ 5,450
  • New Dates: 26 Dec. 2018 until 11 Jan. 2019 or 18 Jan 2019 to 03 Feb. 2019 or 10 Feb 2019 to 26 Feb. 2019
  • Leadership: Max Kausch 3 time Cho Oyu, Ama Dablam, ShishaPangma, Aconcagua leader and 6000m peak world record holder.
  • Excellent summit rate in 2016. First team to summit in 2015.
  • Best price on the market.  Guides with the most experience in the business.
  • Walk to the top of the highest peak in all of the Americas. One of the famous "7 Summits" (non-technical).
  • We have reached the summit in our last 7 expeditions.
  • We teach you everything you need to know about climbing during the trip.
  • We help you buy and rent inexpensive mountain climbing, trekking, hiking, and walking gear, equipment, clothing, boots, shoes for sale, purchase and hire at affordable, cheap, low prices.
  • Climbing Aconcagua may qualify you for Everest Nepal, Everest Tibet, or Cho Oyu.
Recent News:  Aconcagua Expedition was a huge success and the team returned home safely. Please click here for recent blog. Archived News" for more stories of past .
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Aconcagua Climbing Expedition - Highest Peak In All Of The Americas

Please click one of the links below to view that section of our introductory information or just scroll down. (photo right by Ted Alexander: team trekking into Aconcagua basecamp).

team trekking into Aconcagua basecamp

Aconcagua Climbing Expedition Program Description:

Aconcagua (6962 metres/22,841 feet) is the highest mountain in all of the Americas and one of the "7 Summits". This magnificent Andean peak offers a high altitude adventure; a chance to walk or climb on a big mountain expedition for a relatively low cost and in a short amount of time. Walking or climbing Aconcagua should qualify you for Everest from Tibet or Everest from Nepal (photo right by Ted Alexander: team trekking into Aconcagua basecamp).

team trekking into Aconcagua basecamp

The Normal Route is the easiest route on Aconcagua . Walk along good trails and scree slopes (sometimes with snow) to reach a very high but attainable summit. We have chosen this route because it allows us to approach through the beautiful Horcones Valley on the lower part of the mountain, making for an easy and enjoyable ascent back to top

  • Leader and staff: During the trek and climb, our experienced leader will be there to make sure everything is going well and ascend the mountain with the team. Meals along the trek are prepared as a group and once we reach basecamp, fresh, tasty food and hot drinks are prepared as a group in a full kitchen and dining tent. The leaders help make sure members cook and fill water bottles above basecamp. Photo Right: Approaching Camp 1 - Plaza Canada - Max Kausch

  • Aconcagua National Park: One of the most spectacular protected areas in the Republic of Argentina. The 71,000 hectare park is located in the Province of Mendoza a few kilometres east of the border of Chile. The park was founded in 1983 in order to preserve the beauty of the landscape, flora, fauna, and archaeological material. The road near Aconcagua is surrounded by Andean peaks and has been an ancient passage for travelers since before the Spaniards arrival. back to top 

  • the final steep hike up the 'canaleta' is normally a rocky trail, it could be interesting with snow, so we ask you to bring your ice axe and crampons for this partTrek to basecamp: We walk along gradually ascending wide trails to basecamp. Mules are loaded and carry all of your personal equipment, as well as group equipment , so you do not have to carry a heavy rucksack. Along the walk there are spectacular views of the rising glacial peaks surrounding us, local flora, fauna, and wildlife, such as amazing condors and guanacos (wild llamas). During our approach to basecamp at "Plaza de Mulas", we gradually ascend 1500 metres/5000 feet, over 3 days. This helps us to acclimate to the altitude and prepare for our summit attempt (photo: the final steep hike up the 'canaleta' is normally a rocky trail, it could be interesting with snow, so we ask you to bring your ice axe and crampons for this part (Ted Alexander).

  • Walking to the high camp: Above basecamp we walk carefully and slowly to cross volcanic slopes on good trails to reach the high camp (5900 metres/19,400 feet). We spend several days making 4-7 hour acclimatization hikes up and down the mountain, as well as resting. The higher we go, the better the views of the surrounding Andean peaks, and the camps are relatively comfortable for the few days we reside there.

    aconcagua, aconcagua summit, aconcagua climb
  • Summit attempt: From the high camp we traverse scree slopes to the "normal route", following the well-trodden path through the "Canaleta", a steep valley between two ridges piled with large rocks. Then we walk across boulders and ledges, occasionally dusted with snow, to reach the highest summit in all of the Americas. Photo right: Team at Summit. Photo Mike

  • Who is this trip for?
    • Our expedition is open to men and women of all ages from around the world who may never have been on a big mountain and wish to test themselves at high altitude. Most of our members join as individuals, our team dynamics work well, and we are able to build successful and safe groups of people who enjoy walking and climbing together. We encourage you to come as an individual team member or with another person,basecamp, aconcagua whether that is your spouse, partner, friends, sibling, clients, colleagues, or bring your own group (photo: Basecamp with light. Photo Max)
    • You should be a fit and active walker in good health able to carry (to the high camp, but not the summit) a rucksack containing your sleeping bag, clothing, food, water, and for the stronger members, some group equipment.
    • During the expedition we teach all of the mountain skills you need. back to top

Please "click" one of the links on the column on the upper right of your screen under "Aconcagua" to learn more about our expedition.

Aconcagua Cost

* Our “full-service” expedition includes:

  • Leader: Cost includes a very experienced and qualified British, European, or American leader;
  • Hotels and meals in Pentitentes on a twin sharing basis in tourist class hotel; 
  • Private transfer to and from Pentitentes and Park Gate; 
  • Assistant guides and cooks; 
  • 5 days of hot delicious meals and tents at BC and 2 days at Confluencia; 
  • Mules for group and personal gear (25 kg/45 pounds, personal) to and from BC; 
  • All meals on the mountain; 
  • Camping equipment including tents, stoves, etcetera; 
  • Group climbing equipment. 
  • Transfer from Mendoza airport to Mendoza hotel is included.
Basic Option: Includes everything up to BC (transport, hotel, BC logistics, Approach camp logistics + tents, food, airport pick up, etc) From there you will need your own tents, stoves, food, etc.
*Not Included:
  • Personal climbing permit. About: for January U$ 860 & for February U$ 625;**
  • Hotel and meals in Mendoza,hotels are $95/double room and meals about $30 USD/day;
  • Items of personal nature, individual travel costs, delays, taxis, etc.;
  • Personal Argentina entry visas if applicable;
  • Staff and leader tips (about $200 is recommended)
  • Duffle bags for packing your personal equipment on mules;
  • Recommended travel Insurance;
  • Personal clothing or equipment;
  • Alcoholic drinks and personal snacks; 
  • International flights to Mendoza and back to your home country
  • Any extra costs related to an early leave of the expedition due to medical or personal reasons;
  • Staff gratuities.
  • Porters - they are available for a daily fee of:
    • P. Mulas- Canadá:                               US $ 145
    • P. Mulas- Nido de Cóndores:                US $ 220
    • P. Mulas- Cólera:                                US $ 270
    • Cólera- P. Mulas:                                US $ 270

* Note: These prices are per porter to ascent the equipment. The same prices are to descent. Porters carry up to 20kg each. They all go back to Base Camp. Payment is for every tract. Rates are accumulative. For more details please Click Here

** Note: The permit price can and probably will increase next season. Aconcagua National Park has control on this and they won't reveal the permit price until November 15th. This is why we don't include the permit in the expedition total price.

Equipment Transport: Our expedition includes transport of all of your equipment from Mendoza to our destination, and returned to Mendoza. While trekking to basecamp, we DO NOT ask our full-service members to carry heavy group equipment (although it is an option if you really want to), such as tents, rope, fuel, food, etcetera. We have mules to carry personal and group equipment to basecamp. Above basecamp, we may ask you to carry a portion of the group equipment, depending opn your strength and body weight.

Mule driver on the way to basecamp
Here is our mule driver, Rafael Sosa, on the trail to basecamp. These people are colorful characters, and do a good job of delivering our equipment and supplies to basecamp. Aconcagua is visible in the background (Daniel Mazur).

Cooks and Food: Meals along the trek and at basecamp are prepared by our staff so you don't have to cook. Fresh, tasty food and hot drinks are prepared for you in a full kitchen. We normally have a whole dining tent for ourselves. The leaders help making sure all members are fed properly and fill water bottles above basecamp. For more about where we stay and what we shall eat,  please click here .

Group Equipment: We provide a plethora of top-quality, and time-tested equipment, group gear, and supplies, including: rope, ice, rock, and snow anchor protection; basecamp, advanced basecamp and altitude tents; cookers, fuel, walkie-talkie radios, etcetera. Please see the above EQUIPMENT link, to study what we bring for your use and safety. back to top

Staff: Our staff, working together through local agencies, are hospitality experts and have, for many years, been arranging overland tours, safaris, raft trips, treks, mountain climbs, trek support staff, cooks, peak climbing permits, satellite phone permits, video and film-making permits, translators, liaison officers, porters, helicopter flights, air tickets, equipment purchase/hire, storage, import/export, shipping, customs clearance, transport bookings, advance hotel bookings, visas, repatriations, and permits.

Safety: BOTH full-service and basic expeditions are allowed access to our extensive communications equipment, medical supplies, first-aid kits, and medical oxygen in case of emergency. Thank you for being a well-prepared and safe team member! back to top

Please ask any questions regarding cost at info@summitclimb.com.

Aconcagua Climbing Expedition Itinerary

All members must arrive on the first day of the scheduled itinerary and plan on staying until the last day (unless you have made special arrangements).

Please also visit our Aconcagua route description for more about what to expect on the drive from Mendoza, the trek to basecamp, during the climb itself, etcetera.

Note: This is a proposed schedule, which has been developed through previous trips. The actual itinerary of your trip can differ depending on such factors as weather and local conditions. For example, the trip may finish earlier than these dates, or we may need every single day of the schedule. Thank you for being patient and flexible when coming to a foreign country like Argentina.

  • Day 1 – Arrival to Mendoza – 900meter / 2,950 foot

    One member of our staff will welcome you at the airport and bring you to the hotel. In the evening all expedition members will meet for dinner. Depending upon your arrival time, we will assist you to buy or rent all equipment you need. Included: Transport and hotel.

  • Day 2 – Permissions and drive to Penitentes – 2300meter / 7,550 foot

    We will have morning meeting about logistics and all expedition aspects as well as answering any questions you might have. We will also check all your personal equipment, assist you for rentals and purchases and sort out all climbing permits so you can legally climb Aconcagua. Included: Transport, hotel and dinner.
  • Day 3 – Penitentes – Confluencia – 3300meter / 10,830 foot
Our luggage is carried by mules at 5am to Confluencia so we will have everything packed in the previous night. After taking breakfast at our hotel in Penitentes we’ll take a private transport to Horcones where we entry Aconcagua Provincial Park. We’ll stop for lunch at Puente del Inca and at 2pm we’ll start the 3-4 hour trek to Confluencia. Our staff will wait for us with a reception meal at our dinning tent. In the evening we will have dinner and sleep in tents. Included: Private transport, breakfast, lunch at Puente del Inca, reception meal in Confluencia and dinner.

  • Day 4 – Confluencia – Plaza Francia – Confluencia – 4150meter / 13,615 foot
This is one of our acclimatisation days. We’ll walk carrying a basic rucksack with water, jacket, gloves, trekking poles, sunscreen, etc. and walk very slowly to the base of the south face of Aconcagua. The views are are absolutely stunning! We might even see some avalanches falling from the souther steep slopes of Aconcagua. Included: Double tents with mattress, Breakfast, lunch and dinner.

  • Day 5 – Confluencia – Plaza de Mulas – 4300meter / 14,110 foot
Today is the longest day. The 18km walk to BC might take us from 5 to 8 hours. We’ll carry a very light rucksack and have lunch at the base of a huge rock named Ibañez. The landscape here is very dry so you might want to bring a good hat. At the end of the huge open valley named Horcones we will arrive to Plaza de Mulas, our basecamp. Included: Double tents with mattress, breakfast, lunch and dinner.

  • Day 6 – Rest – 4300meter / 14,110 foot
Rest day at Plaza de Mulas. Depending on the state of the entire team, we can take a short walk to a nearby glacier. Included: Double tents with mattress, Breakfast, lunch and dinner.

  • Day 7 – Acclimatization Walk to Plaza Canada – 4900 meter / 16,050 foot
About 4 hour walk to 4900 metres (600 metre altitude gain) taking part of our personal climbing equipment. We’ll return to sleep at BC in the same day. Included: Double tents with mattress, Breakfast, lunch and dinner.

  • Day 8 – Rest – 4300meter / 14,110 foot
Rest day at Plaza de Mulas. We recommend you to do absolutely nothing today. Included: Double tents with mattress, Breakfast, lunch and dinner.

  • 9 – Plaza de Mulas – Plaza Canada – 4900meter / 16,050 foot
Four hour walk to Plaza Canada after a nice breakfast at BC. Included: Double tents, Breakfast, lunch and dinner.

  • Day 10 – Plaza Canada – Nido de Condores – 5600meter / 18,370 foot
Five hour walk to Nido de Condores, our second camp. Included: Double tents, Breakfast, lunch and dinner.

  • Day 11 – Rest at Nido de Condores – 5600meter / 18,370 foot
Light walks around camp to improve acclimatisation. Included: Double tents, Breakfast, lunch and dinner.

  • Day 12 – Nido de Condores – Colera – 5950 meter / 19, 500 foot
3 to 4 hour walk with carrying climbing equipment (wearing most of it) to Colera, our last camp at almost 6000 metres.
Included: Double tents, Breakfast and lunch.

  • Day 13 – Colera – Summit – Colera – 6962meter / 22,850
Early start to the first summit attempt (2 or 3am). We’ll hidrate as much as we can and leave camp at around 4am for the 12 hour round trip to the summit (average time) Included: Double tents and water melting

  • Day 14 – Colera – Plaza de Mulas – 4300meter / 14,110 foot
We’ll walk down through all camps arriving at BC at around 4pm. Included: Double tents with mattress, Breakfast, lunch and celebration dinner.

  • Day 15 – Plaza de Mulas, Confluencia, Mendoza – 4300m / 14,110 foot
After an 8am breakfast we’ll pack our duffels and send them to Horcones on mules and start the 8 hour walk to Horcones. On the way we’ll stop at Confluencia for food and a short break. Our private transport will wait for us at Horcones and take us to Penitentes so we can take another private transport to Mendoza. On the way we’ll stop at Uspallata for a steak dinner. Included: Breakfast, pack lunch, snack food in Confluencia, private transport and celebration steak dinner. Hotel in Mendoza not included in cost.

  • Day 16 – Flight out – 900meter / 2, 950 foot
You will be taken to the airport 2-3 hours before your flight. Included: breakfast and private transport.

  • Day 17 – Spare acclimatisation day or weather day.

** The above itinerary is subject to change due weather conditions, performance of the group, political / administrative problems and any other events not described. back to top

Thank you for joining our Aconcagua expedition.

Aconcagua Climbing Expedition Route Description

Please click one of the links below to view that section for the route on Aconcagua, or scroll down.

Itinerary-
The proposed itinerary allows enough time for proper acclimatization, rest days, and several returns to base camp where the kitchen and base camp staff can look after all of your needs, and quell your appetite. The weather at this time of year is normally quite good and stable. However, we all know the global weather is changing, and in case of storms, you will note the proposed itinerary includes extra days as well. In previous expeditions, half of those who reached the summit needed every single "extra" day (photo right by Ted Alexander: team members trekking up towards Aconcagua basecamp). back to top
Arriving in Mendoza-
The trip begins in the charming city of Mendoza (740 metres/2428 feet). Our staff will pick you up at the airport and take you to your hotel. That night we will have a welcome dinner together to meet the team and go over plans for the coming weeks.
Mendoza is clean and modern, comparable to cities in certain parts of Europe. There are over 1.5 million people inhabiting this bustling, wine-producing and fruit-farming centre, where the ambiance is a bit more casual than other cities in Argentina. There is plenty to experience with the sidewalk cafes, great restaurants, fine & inexpensive wines, Argentine beef, and plethora of shops. Members may wish to visit the local alpine club, "Club Andinista Mendoza", where they can purchase topographic maps, memorabilia, and learn more about the Andes and Aconcagua from the local climbers (Photo right by Ted Alexander: team walking up between camp 1 and camp 2).
The day after you arrive we will sort equipment and visit the Permit Office in Mendoza (please plan on having approximately $700, £450, €530 or $1000 Pesos Argentine, in cash for your permit). After picking up the permits we will have private transport to Los Pentitentes (2720 metres/8,900 feet), where we will sleep in a comfortable hotel. back to top
Trekking to Basecamp-
Aconcagua National Park is one of the most spectacular protected areas in the Republic of Argentina. The 71,000 hectare park is located in the Province of Mendoza a few kilometres east of the border of Chile. The park was founded in 1983 in order to preserve the beauty of the landscape, flora, fauna, and archaeological material. The road near Aconcagua is surrounded by Andean peaks and has been an ancient passage for travelers since before the Spaniards arrival.
Our approach to the mountain is the majestic Horcones Valley route. We walk along gradually ascending wide trails to basecamp. Mules are loaded and carry all of your personal equipment, as well as group equipment , so you do not have to carry a heavy rucksack during the trek. There are spectacular views of the rising glacial peaks surrounding us, local flora, fauna, and wildlife, such as amazing condors and guanacos (wild llamas). During our approach to basecamp at "Plaza de Mulas", we gradually ascend 1500 metres/5000 feet, over 3 days. This helps us to acclimate to the altitude and prepare for our summit attempt. back to top
We commence by driving to the small town of Penitentes (2720 metres/8,900 feet) and begin our trek to basecamp, hiking up the west side of the Horcones River to Confluencia (3320 metres/10,900 feet). The Aconcagua Provincial Park rangers check permits here and issue rubbish bags. We will camp here for the night.
Mule driver on the way to basecamp

Here is our mule driver, Rafael Sosa, on the trail to basecamp. These people are colorful characters, and do a good job of delivering our equipment and supplies to basecamp. Aconcagua is visible in the background (Daniel Mazur).
The next day we take an acclimatization hike to Plaza Francia, which sits beneath the impressive 3000 metre/10,000 foot South Face of Aconcagua, one of the world's most difficult alpine climbs. The path climbs gradually up this impressive valley on the lateral moraine of a beautiful glacial flow from the south face of Aconcagua. This is a fun acclimatization walk and affords spectacular views of one of the most impressive rock and ice faces in the world. We then return to camp at Confluencia.
The third day of our trek we walk to basecamp, "Plaza de Mulas" (4360 metres/14,300 feet). We leave Confluencia, crossing several streams and desert landscapes on a 14 mile walk to basecamp. Basecamp is actually a rock covered glacier, where water can be obtained from pools of ice on the surface. We will rest here before beginning our ascent to the high camps. back to top

Plaza Argentina - Our Basecamp

Plaza Argentina, our basecamp for both routes, is located at 4200 meters/13,800 feet. The trail to Camp 1, at 5000 meters/16,400 feet, is visible in the obvious notch, just to the right of center (Daniel Mazur).

Moving to the High Camps-
From "Plaza de Mulas" we carry loads for acclimatization up to the first camp named Plaza Canada (4,900 metres/16,000 feet). Several trails lead up from basecamp to there over the moraine of the Horcones Glacier. The trails are very well marked and usually very easy to follow. Plaza Canada is about half way of a huge ramp that starts at basecamp. The trail taking to the first camp can be seen from lower down. It turns to the right, almost stuck to the west face.

Camp 1 at 5000 Meters Camp 2 at 5900 Meters

Camp 1 at 5000 meters/16,400 feet. Mark Pearson is on the left and Paul Jensen on the right. You can see the trail to Camp 2 on the gravel slope behind camp (Daniel Mazur). Camp 2 at 5900 meters/19,400 feet. It is sheltered by a huge boulder. Here is where we climb to the summit from. We can go to the Polish Glacier from here, or traverse over to the Normal Route (Daniel Mazur).

From Plaza Canada, we head up to the second camp named Nido de Condores (5,500 metres/18,000 feet). Walking on scree with rocks along a gradual slope, we attain to a huge platform with a very light slope. Here is Nido de Condores and we have views to several mountains at the north side of Aconcagu.

From Nido de Condores we plan to ascend towards either 1 of the camps: Berlin or Colera (5,950 metres/19,550). This is a very short day but we’ll only touch one of these high camps during our summit push.back to top

Climbing the Normal Route-
The Berlin Camp consists of the three huts: Nicolas Plantamura (built in 1946), Libertad (renamed "Eva Peron" after it was built in 1951), and the Berlin Hut (constructed by climbers from Berlin in honor of a friend who passed away on Aconcagua ).
The route heads up the vague ridge to the right above Campo Berlin, passing a campsite known as "White Rocks" (6000 metres/19,700 feet). Continuing up and to the right leads to Refugio Independencia at 6546 metres/21,476 feet, which is reportedly the highest alpine refuge in the world (built in 1951).

Final Traverse between Campo Berlin and the Canaleta

The final traverse between Campo Berlin (5950 metres/19,550 feet) and the Canaleta, which begins around 6600 meters/19,700 feet. It is an easy hike. Sometimes there is snow (Daniel Mazur). In the top of the Canaleta (Ryan Waters).

Crossing the Cresta del Viento (Windy Crest), we head up the upper Gran Acarreo to the famous Canaleta, which may be the most interesting part of the route, being a steep valley between two ridges piled with large rocks. The Canaleta ends atop the Cresta del Guanaco, the ridge that connects the lower South with the higher North Summit of Aconcagua. Following the ridge crest we end up on the slightly sloping summit plateau on top of the highest peak in all of the Americas. An aluminum cross marks the top of the mountain.
Looking into the Canaleta
Dave Elmore and Ryan Waters on the summit (Dan Mazur). Looking into the Canaleta from just below the summit (6900 meters/22,600 feet). You can see all of the Canaleta. Guanaco Ridge is on the left, and in the notch at the bottom of the Canaleta, is the Nido de Condores area around 5000 meters/16,400 feet ( Daniel Mazur). back to top
Thank You for joining our Aconcagua Expedition.

Aconcagua Climbing Expedition Leadership

This expedition to Aconcagua maximizes many years of accumulated wisdom of the higher ranges of the world, a strong record of reaching the top of 8,000ers: Everest, K2, Kangchenjunga, Lhotse, Makalu, Cho-Oyu, Shishapangma, and many other summits, in addition to more than 50 South American & Himalayan expeditions, in all safety, along with an intimate knowledge of the Argentine officials who regulate the permit system. We have conducted countless 7000 metre peak expeditions, and consider ourselves specialists in leading, organizing, and getting teams safely to the summit and back down. We have been running trips to Aconcagua since 1990 and we know all of the bureaucratic officials, liaison officers, mule drivers, and hoteliers/restaurateurs personally.

Leadership: During this full-service expedition, you will benefit from the leadership provided by Max Kaush.

Max Kausch is a fluent English, Spanish, and Portuguese speaker, Cho Oyu, Lhotse, and Ama Dablam leader, and technical expert. He is a relaxed, considerate and thoughtful person; an expert leader and a highly-skilled professional who specializes in getting people to the summit and back down in 100 percent safety (photo right: Max on Cho Oyu).

Organizer: Your expedition is organized by our British, European, and American, office personnel working on-the-ground together as well as in your home-country. For example, one of our lead organizers is the very experienced Dan Mazur, Aconcagua summitter/leader and climber-leader-organizer of Everest, K2, and 12 "eight-thousand-metre-peaks". He is a relaxed, friendly and well organized person, and a highly-skilled professional with 25 years experience in helping people explore the mountains, with the highest attention to detail, comfort, and safety.

Aconcagua - Your Experience & Training

Please "click" one of the links below to go directly to that information or scroll down.

Team Member Experience:

For the Normal Route it is not necessary for you to have previous climbing experience. We will teach you all of the mountain skills you need to know during the trip. You should be a fit and active walker in good health able to carry (to the high camp, but not the summit) a rucksack containing your sleeping bag, clothing, food, water, and for the stronger members, some group equipment.

Our goal is to work together as a team so that all members reach the top safely. We do not expect you to be expert (although some members are) but, nor are we a climbing school (although we do conduct one or two days of training at the beginning of each expedition, please see below). If you feel you need fundamental technical training, and snow and ice experience, we urge you to participate in our Glacier School held each spring and autumn. Members need to have experience in being part of a team, working toward a common goal, and be ready to work with the group and be a good "team-player".

Our leaders are there to ensure (for our full-service members) you make it up to the summit and back down safely. Team members are expected to be able to care for themselves in a winter-camping and climbing environment. Obviously when climbing the highest mountain in the Americas, there are hazards present, and members must have experience (for Polish Direct) in roped rock and ice climbing techniques (to protect from falling), and have winter-condition climbing experience in the greater ranges of the world, including placing and retrieving anchors, belaying, abseiling, glacier rescue and avalanche awareness. It is also required that all members will have knowledge of altitude sickness, frostbite, and the recognition of their symptoms, prevention, and treatment. When traveling above basecamp, all members must climb with another team member or leader at all times.

Neither solo climbing, nor descending, are allowed above basecamp. However, we welcome you to join our expedition as an individual and most of our members do. The main expectation is that members will be prepared to climb with a team member or leader at all times above basecamp. This practice ensures that the entire team has a fun, successful, and safe time on the mountain. back to top

 

Fitness and Health:

To participate in this expedition you must be a very fit and active winter-walker-climber in good health able to carry (to the high camp, but not the summit) a rucksack containing your sleeping bag, clothing, food, water, and for the stronger members, some group equipment. Prior to joining our group, please see your doctor and obtain the necessary permission and advice, as well as medications for travel in extremes of altitude, and also for exotic locales.

If you do not wish to or are unable to carry your personal equipment on the mountain, porters are available to hire for $150-$250, £95-£160, or €110-€185 per day. They may be hired in basecamp upon your arrival, as it is staffed all season back to top

 

Training Prior to the Expedition:

  • Firstly, you should always consult your doctor before starting a rigorous exercise plan.
  • In the beginning, to see how you handle the training, and to avoid muscle strains that could slow your training down, you may wish to use shorter more frequent but less taxing workouts, and take more rest. After you get "up to speed" as it were, you could increase the rigour. Older climbers and walkers please take note of the latter. Also remember that swimming is an excellent form of training because it does not put stress upon your joints. Thank you.
  • In order to train well for your trip you should work toward excercising 3 to 4 times a week for between 40 minutes and an hour and a half each time. You should expect to work hard, and try to keep your heartrate quite high and your breathing quite heavy.
  • Adequate rest and a well balanced diet are also essential to avoid injury and illness before the expedition. You should sleep at least 8 hours per night, and eat 3 nutritious meals a day. Don't forget that you will perspire when you train, so try to drink at least 4 litres/quarts of water a day.
  • Utilising both gym equipment and the great outdoors will provide a more balanced exercise programme. You should try to accomplish at least half of your workouts outside. This could include walking and running (On stairs and hills too) and cycling, but above all should be fun! Hillwalking and climbing with a pack weighing 5-10 Kilos/10-20 pounds is essential. If you don't have hills, why not go for stairs, bleachers, viewing stands, stadiums, even the stairways in tall buildings? Don't forget to spend time directly working the muscles of the legs, back and shoulders, and remember that your own body weight can be just as effective as weights, or machines.
  • About 6 weeks before the expedition departure date, you may wish to do 1 full day each week of hill walking, climbing or an equivalent, with a light rucksack. On that day, you would want to eventually work toward six-eight hours of continuous walking or climbing up and down hill, with 4 to 6 separate ten minute breaks and a 1/2 to 1 hour lunch break midway through.
  • To minimize the chance of injuring yourself, consider starting with a half day and then if you do well, increase to 2/3, then eventually to a full day, once a week.
  • We want you to arrive for your expedition in top shape, so please take plenty of rest and do not over-do it.
  • Hint: when carrying a rucksack while descending, walking, or climbing down-hill, try carrying a bit less in your rucksack in order to save your knees. Many trainers advise carrying water bottles up the hill then emptying them at the top so your rucksack is lightened for the trip down. back to top

Training During the Expedition:

  • Upon arrival in Mendoza and in the base camp, ALL full-service and basic-climb members are requested to participate an orientation to how the trip will be operated. There will be plenty of time for discussion, question answering, and for equipment review and possible purchasing/renting. Training will be conducted both in Mendoza and in basecamp in the areas (depending on which route you are doing) of basic climbing techniques, glacier travel, rope fixing, ascending, descending, safety techniques, rappels (abseils), belaying, medical equipment and procedures, communications equipment, camping techniques and high-altitude cooking. For the expert and beginner alike, it is important to review these techniques in order to enhance skills, ensure safety-awareness, and work together as a team.

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We hope that you will arrive for your Aconcagua Expedition in good health, both mentally and physically prepared, so we can work together as a team and have a successful expedition.

Aconcagua Climbing Expedition - Personal & Team Equipment

Below is a detailed list of equipment you need to bring for Aconcagua and at the bottom is a description of team equipment that we bring for you.

All of this equipment is needed for both the Normal Traverse and Polish Direct, except for the second to last category below, "Equipment needed for Polish Direct (not Normal Traverse)".

Weather: Like most big mountains, Aconcagua generates and attracts its own weather, making it unpredictable at times. A wide range of temperatures, from freezing nights, snowy and windy conditions, and bright sunshine intensified by the high altitude, may occur on the expedition. It can get very cold in the high camps on Aconcagua, with average temperatures 0º C/32º F during the day and -25º C/-13º F at night. Climbers on our December to January trips, may find snowfields high on the mountain, while on our February trips, members will encounter less snow and more dry, rocky terrain.
The best time to climb Aconcagua is from December to early March, during the Southern Hemisphere's summer, where days of clear sunny skies are quite normal. The mountain does receive occasional storms during the climbing season due to the muggy, humid winds blowing west off the Pacific Ocean. When this air rises over the slopes of the Andes, it's speed increases and it condenses to form lenticular clouds on the summit, known as white wind (viento blanco). Southern winds are usually an auspicious sign of good weather.
In Mendoza and the lower areas along the trek, the Southern hemisphere summer temperatures fluctuate between 18-33º C/65-90º F, with warm days and cool nights.
  • Goretex jacket U$67.00
  • Trekking poles (pair) U$30.00
  • Double plastic boots U$115.00
  • Hiking boots U$55.00
  • Duffel bag U$30.00
  • Fleece Jacket U$30.00
  • Down Jacket U$97.00
  • Mattress U$24.00
  • Crampons U$49.00
  • Gloves polartec U$15.00
  • Mountain sunglasses U$30.00
  • Mitens U$42.00
  • Rucksack U$55.00
  • Pants polartec U$30.00
  • Pants goretex U$55.00
  • Piolet/Ice axe U$49.00
  • Gaiters U$24.00
  • Down Sleeping bag -30C U$127.00

(Click link below to go directly to that section of the equipment list or just scroll down):

Please go to our personal & team equipment section of the "Aconcagua Questions" for additional information and detailed discussion of the equipment lists below.

Where should I purchase my equipment?

Please "click here" to view our list of recommendations on where to purchase kit from our Aconcagua Frequently Asked Questions.

Renting or buying mountain equipment in Mendoza is very easy. There are several shops in town and if your sizes aren't too different than normal you shouldn't have a problem. These CANNOT be paid by credit card due to argentine foreign card restrictions. Please add up the equipment you want to rent based on the list below and bring enough US DOLLARS for this. Prices vary a lot but this is roughly what we had last season (the price is for the 18-20 day itinerary):


* Please note that if your boot size is larger or smaller than normal we might need extra time to find your boots. Please let us know in advance

Upper Body-

  • Upper Body-
  • Wind/waterproof/breathable jacket;
  • 1  very warm heavy down/duvet jacket or synthetic fill jacket with insulated hood;
  • 1 warm fleece jacket;
  • 3 long sleeve polypropylene shirt. Lightweight, light colored better for sun;
  • 1 polypropylene t-shirt;
  • Womens sports bras. Synthetic. Cotton is not appropriate. back to top

Hands-

  • 1 pair very warm mittens, consists of 1 water proof (gore-tex) over mitt matched with the very warm polar fleece mitt liner,
  • 2 pairs of hand-warmers. These are chemical pouches which warm up in contact with oxygen
  • 1 pair of windproof all day gloves; back to top

Head-

  • Helmet for Polish Direct Route members;
  • 1 balaclava;
  • 1 light weight warm hat wool or synthetic;
  • 2 buffs or bandanas;
  • Visor or sun cap;
  • Glacier glasses. 100% UV protection with side shields and a hard-sided storage case;
  • Ski goggles for on the mountain;
  • Headlamp with extra batteries & bulbs. Must be reliable with a strong beam. LEDs and Halogen Combos are good. back to top

Lower Body-

  • 1 pr wind/waterproof/breathable (gore-tex) trousers, salopettes, or bibs. Mid-heavy weight with side zips; Make sure multiple layers fit underneath;
  • 1 pr medium weight polar fleece trousers; No windproof materials, but warm pile fabric;
  • 1 pr medium weight polypropylene/thermal leggings;
  • 1 pr lightweight polypropylene/thermal leggings;
  • 1 pr non-cotton walking trousers;
  • 2 pair lightweight long underwear. Polypropylene or capilene;
  • 1 pair nylon shorts. Quick-drying type for hiking, please no cotton. back to top

Feet-

  • Double plastic boots (koflach) or One-Sport Millet Everest boots or equivalent. The boots must fit with one thick and one thin pair of socks with room to spare, not too tight;
  • Crampons - must fit boots perfectly. Steel crampons with anti-balling (anti-bot) plates are the best;
  • Light hiking shoes or trail shoes. For the hike to base camp and acclimatization hikes;
  • Gaiters, make sure they will fit over plastic boots;
  • 1 pair sandals are optional, nice for town or basecamp;
  • 2 pair of liner socks;
  • vapour barrier liner socks or plastic bread-bags;
  • 3 pair heavy wool/synthetic socks. back to top

Sleeping-

  • Sleeping bag. Rated to at least -10 to - 15 C / 0 to 15 F;
  • Sleeping pad. 1 full length closed cell foam. back to top

Rucksack-

  • Internal frame rucksack, large (80 litre/5000 cubic inches);
  • 1 daypack for the approach hike, possible use on summit day and carry-on pack. If you plan to use it for your summit pack it must be large enough for your down jacket, misc. clothes, food and water;
  • Travel, kit, or duffel bag with lock, (80‑100 litre/5,000-6,000 cubic inches). Your porter will carry this large bag;
  • Medium size travel, kit, duffel bag (with locks) for storage at the hotel in Mendoza. back to top

Personal Hygiene-

  • Female or male hygiene supplies;
  • Personal toiletry kit;
  • Hand wipes and camp towel;
  • 2 Lip balm. Make sure it is sun-proof;
  • Sunscreen. At least SPF 40. back to top

Medical-

  • small personal first-aid kit. (Simple and Light) Aspirin, first-aid tape, plasters (band-aids), personal medications, etc. The leaders will have extensive first-aid kits, so leave anything extra behind. Please let your leader know about any medical issues before the climb;
  • 1 skin blister repair kit;
  • 1 small bottle anti-diarrhea pills;
  • 1 small bottle anti-headache pills, Ibuprofin, Pracetamol, Asprin etc.;
  • 1 small bottle cough and/or cold medicine;
  • Enough throat lozenges; sterpsils, Halls etc;
  • 1 small bottle anti-altitude sickness pills: Diamox, Acetylzolamide.
  • 1 small bottle stomach antibiotic: Ciprofloxacin, etc.;
  • 1 small bottle Chest antibiotic: Azytromycin, etc.;
  • Do not bring sleeping pills. They are a respiratory depressant;
  • 1 small bottle of water purification tablets or Steripen;
  • 1 set earplugs; Small personal first aid kit, Medicine, bandaids, etc.;
  • Extra prescription glasses, extra contact lens supplies (contact lens wearers: there is a lot of dust, you definitely need to bring prescription glasses as a backup);
  • 1 bottle water purification tablets, drops, or filter;
  • Ear plugs. back to top

Personal Food-

Meals along the trek are provided by the leaders and once we reach basecamp, fresh, tasty food and hot drinks are prepared by our logistics staff in a full kitchen and dining tent. The leaders cook and fill water bottles above basecamp.

  • Favorite snack foods. 1 kg / 2 pounds is a good amount (you may buy these in Mendoza);
  • 4 dehydrated meals (freeze-dried dinners) for the high camp. back to top

Practical-

  • 3 lightweight thermos bottles and water bottles. Nalgene type (1 is a pee bottle);
  • Plastic mug. Nice for hot drinks;
  • Bowl and spoon. Plastic, small tupperware works well;
  • Pocket knife;
  • 3 large plastic bags/rubbish sacks. For keeping miscellaneous gear dry;
  • Nylon stuff sacks. For food and gear storage and large ziplocs;
  • Extra Cotton Shirts, lighters, candy bars or power bars;
  • Bandanas;
  • Thermos (optional);
  • Basecamp entertainment. For example: paperback books, playing cards, ipod mp3 player, short-wave radio, small sturdy musical instruments, etc.;
  • Camera (you will need to sleep with your camera at night and keep it in your jacket during the day);
  • Cash for hotels, visas, small items and gratuities. Credit cards, traveler's cheques, bank/atm cards. Use an "under the trousers" money belt, not one of those round‑the‑neck jobs or bum‑bags that are really more of a sign showing where the money is;
  • Passport, proof of insurance card, flight ticket. Keep all in plastic bag;
  • Town clothes are recommended in addition to this list above;
  • Please be sure and bring your patience and try to keep an open, relaxed, positive and friendly attitude as travelling in this part of the world may be very different than what you are used to, but things always seem to fall into place at the last moment. Thank you. back to top

Climbing-

  • Ice axe with leash, lightweight;
  • Adjustable trekking poles. back to top

Group Equipment- We provide a plethora of top-quality, and time-tested equipment, group gear, and supplies, including rope and rock protection, tents, etcetera. Please see the group EQUIPMENT link, in the menu bars above to study what we bring for your use and safety. back to top

Please submit any equipment questions or concerns to: info@summitclimb.com

Aconcagua Questions

Aconcagua Video Clips

You will need "Quick Time" to see it. To down load quick time, please click here:Get Quicktime

If you wish to purchase our mountain climbing and trekking films, please contact Videoland Productions.

You can can go to their site www.videolandproductions.com and email info@videolandproductions.com or call (+1)360-491-1332 to buy any and all of the mountain climbing and trekking films we have. Please tell them we said hi!

We will be expanding this section with more Aconcagua video clips.

Aconcagua News

Please click here for Archive News:

Please click here for Recent News:

 
The crux on the Polish Glacier at 6500 meters/21,300 feet. Paul is climbing the last little step onto the east ridge. It's firm snow, tilted at 50 degrees. Not difficult, but a good place to set up a belay (Dan Mazur). In the top of the Canaleta (Ted Alexander).

 

Aconcagua - International Members Application

What questions do you have? Please ask as many questions as possible. This helps us to have a proper conversation so we can better understand one-another's expectations, so you will have a very safe, enjoyable, and successful expedition. Please view our "Aconcagua Questions" page to find trip specific information about the climb.Thank you.

Below you should find a pdf or MS document containing the application pro forma. Are you able to read it? When all of your questions have been answered to your satisfaction, please print out the application and return it to us with your refundable ten-percent deposit, to hold your place in our team. Would you please just post it to us at the mailing address you will find on the form? Thank you very much. If you decide not to go, your deposit will be refunded according to our refund policy. Your registration and the final payment must be completed two months prior to the expedition starting date. Thank you very much.

 

Click here to download the PDF Form for International Applicants

 

If you don't have a PDF reader please get it by clicking here

Here is a checklist of what we need to have in your file at least two months before the trip begins. We encourage you to send an electronic scan of all of the below documents, please be sure they are signed. Thank you:

[ ] Completed Payment. Please restate payments you made.
[ ] Trip Registration Form (part of 4 page form),
[ ] Signed Participant Release and Acknowledgement of Risk (part of 4 page form),
[ ] Signed Terms and Conditions of Booking (part of 4 page form),  
[ ] Signed Medical Form (part of 4 page form),
[ ] 1 Passport sized photo, which is a simple, very clear picture of your face, sent as an email scan. (We simply require a picture of your face against a white background. You can take it yourself for free with your own digital camera or smart phone),
[ ] Exact photocopy of passport identification pages,
[ ] Exact photocopy of complete flight itinerary,
[ ] Proof of mountain rescue and repatriation insurance,
[ ] Proof of travel, accident, and repatriation insurance (cancellation and trip interruption insurance is advised).

Please do let us know what further questions you may have about the registration process, or anything else for that matter. Thank you.
 
 
 
Welcome to our team.

Aconcagua - US Members Application

What questions do you have? Please ask as many questions as possible. This helps us to have a proper conversation so we can better understand one-another's expectations, so you will have a very safe, enjoyable, and successful expedition. Please view our "Aconcagua Questions" page to find trip specific information about the climb. Thank you.

Below you should find a pdf or MS document containing the application pro forma. Are you able to read it? When all of your questions have been answered to your satisfaction, please print out the application and return it to us with your refundable ten-percent deposit, to hold your place in our team. Would you please just post it to us at the mailing address you will find on the form? Thank you very much. If you decide not to go, your deposit will be refunded according to our refund policy. Your registration and the final payment must be completed two months prior to the expedition starting date. Thank you very much.

Click here to download the PDF Form for US Aconcagua Applicants

 
 

If you don't have a PDF reader please get it by clicking here

Here is a checklist of what we need to have in your file at least two months before the trip begins. We encourage you to send an electronic scan of all of the below documents, please be sure they are signed. Thank you:

[ ] Completed Payment. Please restate payments you made.
[ ] Trip Registration Form (part of 4 page form),
[ ] Signed Participant Release and Acknowledgement of Risk (part of 4 page form),
[ ] Signed Terms and Conditions of Booking (part of 4 page form),
[ ] Signed Medical Form (part of 4 page form),
[ ] 1 Passport sized photo, which is a simple, very clear picture of your face, sent as an email scan. (We simply require a picture of your face against a white background. You can take it yourself for free with your own digital camera or smart phone),
[ ] Exact photocopy of passport identification pages,
[ ] Exact photocopy of complete flight itinerary,
[ ] Proof of mountain rescue and repatriation insurance,
[ ] Proof of travel, accident, and repatriation insurance (cancellation and trip interruption insurance is advised).

Please do let us know what further questions you may have about the registration process, or anything else for that matter. Thank you.
 
 
Welcome to our team.

Pre Trip Newsletter

Hi there

Please read the below pre-trip information so your arrival to Argentina goes as smooth as possible:

The main thing you need to know is that at SummitClimb.com our first priority is to HAVE FUN. To be in a place like Aconcagua is a privilege and the summit is just a bonus. So try to enjoy and relax. Don´t get stressed, you pay us to stress for you!

In Mendoza:

1 - If you fly to Mendoza, there will be someone from Inka Expeditions (our local logistic company) holding a sign with your name on it. They will take you to our hotel even if your flight is a little late.

2 - If your flight is very late or for some reason you don´t see the Inka staff, please call me at:

  • Calling with a foreign phone: +54 9 261 660 6650
  • From a local landline: 0261 15 660 6650
  • From a local mobile: 660 6650
3 - If for some reason you couldn´t call me or haven´t met the Inka staff, take a taxi to the hotel. This is very straight forward and might cost around 70-90 pesos (they only take pesos).

4 - I’ll book everyone at the Condor Suites Hotel, which is a 3 star hotel (almost 4) with a small swimming pool, air con unit, kitchen in the rooms, hot shower, great breakfast, etc. The shared rooms cost U$50 per person. As standard, each 2 of you will be sharing a room unless you request to have a whole room for you. In this case, that’s about U$90 per person/night. Please note there’s no need to book hotels, taxis from airports, etc. I will personally organise all that and I need is your arrival date, flight, airline and time.

5 - If you came to Mendoza by bus from Chile we unfortunately won´t be able to pick you up. After trying for a few years we realised that the buses from Chile are unpredictable. This is due to the customs at the argentine border. They might take longer than planned and there is no way to predict that. In this case, please take a taxi to the hotel. They are just outside the bus terminal and cost about 30-40 pesos (they only take pesos).

6 - After you arrive to your hotel room I will meet you personally so we can arrange a time to do equipment rentals and other details about our expedition. Don´t worry, Mendoza has pretty much everything, from boots size 15 to size 5, no problem.

7 - When everyone is safe, rest and showered in Mendoza, we will all have a lunch meeting and go through every single detail on the expedition so everyone is fully aware of what’s going on.

8 - We´ll rent equipment all together at once so we save time and money. But before that I need to check your equipment personally.

9 - Please bring US dollars in cash with you for the climbing permit. It costs U$800 for the December/January guys and U$582 for the February ones. On the top of that there are extra costs on the mountain like porters (U$220 per 20kg from BC to C2), internet (U$18 for 30 min) and also a rescue in case you decide to abandon the expedition. That´s about U$ 1000 ~ U$ 1200 extra you might need to have on you on the mountain and if you don´t use it you can take it back to your home country. We highly recommend you to bring US dollars to pay for these.

10 - Anything related to money and banks is painfully slow and burocratic in Argentina. Please be patient. For instance we´re only allowed to withdrawal up to 1500 pesos per day (about U$180). Companies like Western Union either don´t work or take months to send you money. The best way is to bring US dollars on you (up to U$10,000 per person legally so no problem). Try not to rely on credit and debit cards. I can exchange the money for you and get a better rate in a local bank. Credit card charges/tax are as high as 35% in Argentina! That´s the highest I´ve ever heard in the whole world, so bring CASH!

11 – Apart from bringing cash if you intend to use a credit card in Argentina, please make sure you did the following: Before leaving your home country please tell your bank that you will travel to Argentina so they don´t block your card due to suspicious transactions. Please find out what´s the international phone number so you can call them from Argentina in case your card is blocked.

12 - After you arrived and comfortably checked in your hotel, I´ll arrange a time to come to your room and check your equipment. We do this to make sure you haven´t forgotten anything and to make sure your equipment is adequate for Aconcagua.

13 - At the same day we go up Penitentes we´ll meet at the hotel and go together to sign up the permits for the National Park. In that same day we´ll have lunch together, go for the last minute purchases and details and leave Mendoza at about 15:00 to sleep at 2900m in a mountain hut. We recommend you to drink plenty water to help with the acclimatisation this night.

14 - We´ll try to post a blog entry every 1 or 2 days. Please tell your families and loved ones to follow our Blog. Also please tell them that if there are no news, this means that we´re ok.

15 - I have a sat phone with me the whole time so we can receive weather updates, send blog entries. We prefer to use it only for emergencies but we can use it for any personal calls you might have. Each minute costs $3. At BC you can use sat phones at any time during the day while there is sun to charge batteries.

16 - We have a weather forecast and we get an update every day. So have in mind that our itinerary may suffer a few changed depending upon weather and team acclimatisation.

17 - Foreign mobile phones normally work in Argentina unless they are locked to the frequency you have back home. Normally any 3-band device works and Argentina and will allow you to do calls using your roaming service. There is also the possibility of buying a local SIM card and fit it into your phone. This requires an Argentine ID. Have you mind your telephone provider might charge you a lot of money to use 3G services outside your country.

18 – We include 5 days of food, tents and other services at BC. So far this was never a problem and 5 days were always enough. But in case the weather is really bad and we ALL decide to stay extra days in Aconcagua waiting for a better summit push, this might cost extra U$100 per person per day while we´re at BC. Normally 5 days are more than enough to summit Aconcagua.

19 – In case you decide to abandon the expedition for non-medical reasons, please be aware that this will cost you extra money as the main expedition might be still climbing and we need to organize you private transports and logistics to get you off the mountain. Aconcagua is a very strict National Park and they won´t let anyone leave the mountain alone, this requires extra guides to get you off the mountain. For instance if you want to take a helicopter flight out of Aconcagua, no problem, this costs between 1400-2500 US dollars. However if the reason you are leaving the mountain is medical and this is approved by a BC doctor, the helicopter is free. All these extra expenses might be covered by your insurance and we can provide a letter explaining what happened so you can get reimbursed by your insurance company.

20 – We at SummitClimb.com are highly trained on medical emergencies, high altitude physiology and most of the medical problems you might encounter in high altitudes. Please don´t keep any medical issues from us. The reason we ask all that information isn´t to remove you from our expeditions, but to adapt and help you reach your goals. Please fill the medical forms correctly and don´t hide any information. All information will be kept confidential from public and other members.

Congratulations! You have made it to the end of the pre-trip letter, this shows me you´re tough enough for Aconcagua!

Please keep the questions coming, we love questions!

-----

Max Kausch
SummitClimb.com

Aconcagua Review

Please scroll down to read our Reviews

Here is what Joe says:  I really enjoyed meeting you and climbing with you.

Thanks for everything you did for me and the group in getting 10/11 to the top.  It was an incredible experience. Take care and let's keep in touch. You will always be welcomed at our home . -Joe

Here is what Damon has to say:

Dear SummitClimb,

Thanks for your concern. I was up there at Nido waiting for the wind to calm down for 2 days before the Summit attempt.

I have to say that your organization is really..really well organized. As it seems like everyone was connected to know each member's status. Such small details make the trip worth while.

By the way... Don't ride mules for 4.5 hours. You can't imagine what that will do to your body. I'm still in bed now...recovering.

Happy New Year Damon"

Walking up above camp 2. Photo Ted Alexander. Team trekking the last few metres up to Aconcagua basecamp. Photo  Ted Alexander.  Back to top

We take our member's feedback and review seriously. These help us to refine and make our trips a successful, safe, and enjoyable experience for our future teams.

Aconcagua Climbing Expedition Itinerary

Please click one of the links below to view that section of our Everest Nepal daily itinerary or scroll down


Short Itinerary:

  • Day 1 – Arrival to Mendoza – 900m
  • Day 2 – Drive to Vallecitos – 2900m
  • Day 3 – Hike to Piedra Grande – 3550m
  • Day 4 – Piedra Grande – Salto BC – 4300m
  • Day 5 – Rest – 4300m
  • Day 6 – Salto – Hoyada – Salto – 4700m
  • Day 7 – Rest – 4300m
  • Day 8 – Salto – Hoyada – 4700m
  • Day 9 – Hoyada – Summit – Hoyada – 5943m
  • Day 10 – Hoyada – Mendoza – 900m
  • Day 11 - Rest at Mendoza and permits - 900m
  • Day 12 – Drive to Penitentes and trek to Confluencia – 3300m
  • Day 13 – Confluencia – Plaza de Mulas – 4300m
  • Day 14 – Rest – 4300m
  • Day 15 – Plaza de Mulas – Plaza Canada – 4900m
  • Day 16 – Plaza Canada – Nido de Condores – 5600m
  • Day 17 – Rest at Nido de Condores – 5600m
  • Day 18 – Nido de Condores – Colera – 5950m
  • Day 19 – Colera – Summit – Colera – 6962m
  • Day 20 - Spare summit day
  • Day 21 – Colera – Plaza de Mulas – 4300m
  • Day 22 – Plaza de Mulas, Confluencia, Mendoza – 4300m
  • Day 23 – Flight out – 900m Back to top

FULL ITINERARY

Day 1 – Arrival to Mendoza – 900m

One member of our staff will welcome you at the airport and bring you to the hotel. In the evening all expedition members will meet for dinner. Depending upon your arrival time, we will assist you to buy or rent all equipment you need. Included: Transport and  hotel.

Day 2 – Drive to Vallecitos – 2900m

In the morning of our second day, we will leave the hotel after lunch and head to Vallecitos, an old ski station used now as base for expeditions. Will spend the night in mountain hut named Mausy. The food there is very good, the hut is very cosy and the staff very friendly. You will also meet our guardians Mr Lobo and Miss Brisa, a husky and a weimaraner who will even come with us to BC! Included: Transportation, night in mountain hut and dinner

Day 3 – Hike to Piedra Grande – 3550m

After breakfast our near 600 meters climb starts to Piedra Grande, a very comfortable camp at 3550m. Included: Breakfast, lunch and dinner

Day 4 – Piedra Grande – Salto BC – 4300m

We will take a 3km walk to Salto where we will set up our base camp and spend our next 3 nights. Salto means waterfall in Spanish and this comes from a small waterfall a few metres above camp. Included: Breakfast, lunch and dinner

Day 5 – Rest – 4300m

Rest day at Salto. Depending upon our entire team’s health, we can take a short walk to a nearby glacier or just rest for the whole day. Included: Breakfast, lunch and dinner

Day 6 – Salto – Hoyada – Salto – 4700m

Let’s take a 2km walk to a camp named Hoyada which is almost 4700m. This will be our summit camp and we want to stock it before we actually go there to sleep. This walk to 4700 metres is a great acclimatisation opportunity. Included: Breakfast, lunch and dinner

Day 7 – Rest – 4300m

Rest day at Salto. Very important day of doing absolutely nothing, this will really help with the acclimatisation. Included: Breakfast, lunch and dinner

Day 8 – Salto – Hoyada – 4700m

We will go to sleep to Hoyada and take the remaining equipment up there. Included: Breakfast and lunch

Day 9 – Hoyada – Summit – Hoyada – 5943m

We will try to summit Plata today. We expect a 8 to 12 hour summit push (up and down). In case the weather is bad, wind is too high or the team performance is poor, we will try Cerro Vallecitos (5400m) instead of Cerro Plata.

Day 10 – Hoyada – Mendoza – 900m

We will start early to walk down the mountain passing through Salto, organising our tents and loading the mules. From there we have a 3 hour walk to Vallecitos. Included: Snack, dinner and transport.

Day 11 - Rest at Mendoza and permits - 900m

Your are free to rest and enjoy Mendoza today. Included: breakfast and hotel

Day 12 – Drive to Penitentes and trek to Confluencia – 3300m
We will have morning meeting about logistics and all expedition aspects as well as answering any questions you might have. Included: Transport, hotel and dinner.

Day 13 – Confluencia – Plaza de Mulas – 4300m

Today is the longest day. The 18km walk to BC might take us from 5 to 8 hours. We’ll carry a very light rucksack and have lunch at the base of a huge rock named Ibañez. The landscape here is very dry so you might want to bring a good hat. At the end of the huge open valley named Horcones we will arrive to Plaza de Mulas, our basecamp. Included: Double tents with mattress, breakfast, lunch and dinner.

Day 14 – Rest – 4300m

Rest day at Plaza de Mulas. Depending on the state of the entire team, we can take a short walk to a nearby glacier. Included: Double tents with mattress, Breakfast, lunch and dinner.

Day 15 – Plaza de Mulas – Plaza Canada – 4900m

Three hour walk to Plaza Canada after a nice breakfast at BC. Included: Double tents, Breakfast, lunch and dinner.

Day 16 – Plaza Canada – Nido de Condores – 5600m

Five hour walk to Nido de Condores, our second camp. Included: Double tents, Breakfast, lunch and dinner.

Day 17 – Rest at Nido de Condores – 5600m

Light walks around camp to improve acclimatisation. Included: Double tents, Breakfast, lunch and dinner.

Day 18 – Nido de Condores – Colera – 5950m

3 to 4 hour walk with carrying climbing equipment (wearing most of it) to Colera, our last camp at almost 6000 metres. Included: Double tents, Breakfast and lunch.

Day 19 – Colera – Summit – Colera – 6962m

Early start to the first summit attempt (2 or 3am). We’ll hidrate as much as we can and leave camp at around 4am for the 12 hour round trip to the summit (average time) Included: Double tents and water melting

Day 20 - Spare summit day

Day 21 – Colera – Plaza de Mulas – 4300m
We’ll walk down through all camps arriving at BC at around 4pm. Included: Double tents with mattress, Breakfast, lunch and celebration dinner.

Day 22 – Plaza de Mulas, Confluencia, Mendoza – 4300m

After an 8am breakfast we’ll pack our duffels and send them to Horcones on mules and start the 8 hour walk to Horcones. On the way we’ll stop at Confluencia for food and a short break. Our private transport will wait for us at Horcones and take us to Penitentes so we can take another private transport to Mendoza. On the way we’ll stop at Uspallata for a steak dinner. Included: Breakfast, pack lunch, snack food in Confluencia, private transport, hotel and celebration steak dinner.

Day 23 – Flight out – 900m


** The above itinerary is subject to change due weather conditions, performance of the group, political / administrative problems and any other events not described. Back to top


INCLUDED IN THE PRICE

  • Leadership of Maximo Kausch on Aconcagua, world record holder on number of 6000 metre peaks;
  • English speaking guide with at least 5 years experience guiding Plata;
  • 1 or 2 assistant mountain guides (EPGAMT/AAGM certification) depending upon number or clients (client per guide ratio = 2/3);
  • Help on purchasing and equipment rental in Mendoza;
  • Transport from/to airport;
  • Transport from/to Vallecitos;
  • Night at mountain hut in Vallecitos;
  • 4 days of full pension at Plaza de Mulas (breakfast, lunch, dinner, tents, dinning tent, mattresses, etc);
  • Full pension at Confluencia (breakfast, lunch, dinner, tents, dinning tent, mattresses, etc);
  • 4 nights in a 4 star hotel with breakfast included in Mendoza – rooms are shared by every 2 clients;
  • Transport from/to Penitentes;
  • Lunch at Puente del Inca;
  • Transport from/to Horcones;
  • Mule transport of a 20kg load to/from Plaza de Mulas;
  • Mule transport of a 20kg load to/from Salto (BC at Plata);
  • Transport/assembly of tents, pots, gas, food, water in all camps in Aconcagua and Plata;
  • Steak dinner at Uspallata;
  • Usage of dinning dome tent, toilets tents, personal tents, mountain tents, medical oxygen, gamow bag and medical kit in all camps;
  • Breakfast, lunch, dinner, packed lunch, treated water in the whole Aconcagua and Plata;
  • Gas stoves and pots and cups in all camps at Aconcagua and Plata;
  • We even include Malbec wine for dinner at Plaza de Mulas! Back to top
NOT INCLUDED

  • Flights from/to Mendoza;
  • Climbing permit (it varies according to the time of the year and your nationality, check FAQ);
  • Personal climbing equipment (check equipment tab);
  • Money return in case you abandon the expedition;
  • International travel insurance;
  • Porters for you personal equipment (can be arranged in advanced);
  • Any costs caused by excess luggage (over 20kg);
  • Lunches and dinners at Mendoza;
  • Reimbursement for loss or damage of your personal equipment. Back to top

What our clients say?

  • Here is what Joe says:  

    I really enjoyed meeting you and climbing with you. Thanks for everything you did for me and the group in getting 10/11 to the top.  It was an incredible experience. Take care and let's keep in touch. You will always be welcomed at our home . -Joe

    Here is what Damon has to say:

    Dear SummitClimb,
    Thanks for your concern. I was up there at Nido waiting for the wind to calm down for 2 days before the Summit attempt. I have to say that your organization is really..really well organized. As it seems like everyone was connected to know each member's status. Such small details make the trip worth while. By the way... Don't ride mules for 4.5 hours. You can't imagine what that will do to your body. I'm still in bed now...recovering. Happy New Year Damon