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Everest Tibet and Lhakpa Ri/North Col 2004

Everest Tibet and Lhakpa Ri/North Col Expedition
29 March to 6 June 2004

 

Summit Climb Everest 2004 Dispatch One

Today our Summitclimb.com team met and discussed their plans for the Everest and Lapka Ri expeditions, and the Everest Trek at the Nepa Hotel in Kathmandu. Our team will be representing climbers from The United States, Canada, France, Germany, Holland, Great Britain, Ireland, South Africa, and Nepal. Our plans to depart for Tibet on the 7th may be postponed a day or two due to a major strike against the government that is set to begin tomorrow. For the next few days we will be purchasing any extra needed gear, packing, finalizing the logistics for the expedition, and having a look around Kathmandu. This morning Murari left our passports with the Chinese Embassy for our visas to enter Tibet.

Being my first time in Nepal, Kathmandu can be quite the experience. There is a bunch to see and do while we are here. Kathmandu has a mystic medieval feel to it. Many of the buildings here seem like they belong in a museum with their detailed woodwork. There are some great temples around the city to take a look at. Kathmandu is a very busy city with everyone having somewhere to go. The roads are cluttered with cars, trucks, bikes, motorcycles, pedestrians, and rikshaws, all trying to squeeze through a space barely wide enough for two way traffic. There seems to be no order to the traffic, everyone picks their own route and weaves their way through. It amazes me that I have yet to see a collision. It is great to be here and experience the rich culture this part of the world has to offer. But I think I speak for the team when I say, I will be ready to continue our journey onward to base camp when the time comes for us to depart- after all we have a mountain to climb! -Tom Haines

...

Summit Climb Everest 2004 Dispatch Two

Dear EverestNews.com, Thanks for telling the story of our expedition. Greetings from Kathmandu - where we are STILL waiting for the strike to end - hopefully so that we can get out of here on Friday morning, if a bit of luck goes our way. The strike has been going for two days now, and has affected all the public transport and has closed many of the shops around our hotel here in Thamel. However, the benefit has been that the roads are not clogged with cars and it has given the area a really peaceful feeling, a nice chance to relax in what is normally a frenetic place. However, just to set the record straight, contrary to many of the media reports, there are no problems around Thamel and we are all safe and doing fine.

The team has been arranging personal gear into loads, sorting out our oxygen supplies and making last minute purchases from the few remaining open shops. Duane has been working hard on all the computer and power sourcing issues, and we now have a very impressive setup with batteries / recharging units and solar panels which will hopefully keep us well juiced at base camp.

With his newly orange dyed hair, Deno started a sleep study last night under the tutelage of Dr. Larry Rigsby - an attempt to understand the effect of altitude on sleep patterns. Deno and Galu Sherpa wired themselves up to the Dr. Frankenstein machine with wires all over the bodies and up their noses, and will do so again at above 6000m.

Tomorrow afternoon, the whole team will attend a puja blessing ceremony at the Boudhannath temple to grant us safe passage on the mountain. The lama is a very senior lama who will be coming from the Khumbu region, so we are very fortunate to have such an important man assisting our attempt.

The banda (strike) seems to be scheduled to finish on Thursday night, but it all remains unclear. In any case, we will leave in the early hours of Friday morning, regardless of whether we can make it all the way to the Tibetan border or not. We may have to stop and spend time in the town of Dhulikhel, a few hours outside of Kathmandu, but at least we will be on the way! Hopefully by then, the rain which started today will have stopped, and we can enjoy the journey and views.

Our team is a really multinational affair, with members from ten countries. Very sorry we forgot to mention in our last dispatch that one of or members is from New Zealand and another from Australia. Lots of stories to tell and perspectives to swap, so will no doubt have some great base camp discussions!

Our Everest team consists of the following members:

Ryan Bendixen - USA

Felix Berg - Germany (Assistant Leader)

Patrick Bernier - Canada

Andre Bredenkamp - South Africa

John Briggs - Scotland

Troy Chatwin - USA

Arnold Coster - Netherlands (Assistant Leader)

Chris Drummond - South Africa

Thomas Haines - USA

Deno Hewson - New Zealand

Tim Horvath - USA

Mick Long - Ireland

Bruce Manning - UK

Will Marshall - USA

Daniel Mazur - USA and UK (Leader)

Dr. Eric Meyer - USA

Garth Miller - Australia

Dr. John Mislow - USA

Duane Morrison - USA

Mike Nixon - South Africa

Andrew Prentice - UK

Ian Prentice - UK

Franck Pitula - France

Bridget Rossiter - Ireland

Tom Spear - USA

Keith Spencer - USA

Dr. Ken Stalter - USA

Dr. Ryan Waters - USA (Assistant Leader)

Our Lakpa Ri team is made up of the following members:

Rob Alexander - UK

Greg Mills - USA

Jack Moyer - USA

Elselien Te Hennepe - Netherlands (Assistant Leader)

Murari Sharma - Nepal

Ricki Sheldon - USA

Our North Col team is made up of the following members:

Michael Brown - USA

Marilyn Merriam - UK

Larry Rigsby - USA

We also have the following people trekking with us:

Sara Hall - UK

So that's it from all the Summit Climb team for the moment. Getting ready, getting excited, hopefully getting out of here soon!

Thanks for from all of us at Summitclimb.com .This email was prepared by expedition members Deno Hewson & Ryan Waters.

...

Summit Climb Everest 2004 Dispatch 3

The roads between Kathmandu and the Tibet border are closed till 13 April (its normally a 3 hour drive). The members have decided to try to take a helicopter. We are going to the airport now, and will update you soon. Thanks!

...

Summit Climb Everest 2004 Dispatch 4


From Dan Mazur’s group Everest North East Ridge

Hi all, We are now safely in base camp…! The camp is fantastic with several large mess tents full of people eating and drinking from their respective countries.

The jump in altitude has taken its toll on the group with most people feeling pretty groggy, Ryan Bendixen descended to Dingri [Tingri] with his sherpa to aid his acclimatisation. He hopes to return in the next few days.

Those members who feel good will move up to the intermediate camp 5800mt tomorrow with the rest of the group following when they’re ready. Will write again soon……….. Dan Mazur

...

Summit Climb Everest 2004 Dispatch 5

4/24/2004 Dan Mazur and most of his team are in ABC, but planning to head down soon.

4/27/2004: Dan: The group is doing ok, they have set up ABC. They have 5 tents set up on the North col with 15 more ready to go up. They are fixing rope on the mountain now. Doing ok, Everybody is doing well.

...

Summit Climb Everest 2004 Dispatch 6


4/28/2004: From the South African part of Dan Mazur's Team

Andre Bredenkamp, Chris Drummond, Mike Nixon

 

Have been to ABC and the North Col, but with the heavy snowfall decided to go to BC and rest up. Will soon be headed back up to ABC. Have lost a bit of weight. We are quietly confident. A second ladder is expected to be installed at the second step.

...

Summit Climb Everest 2004 Dispatch 7


5/13/2004: Hi. This is Daniel Mazur writing to you from Mount Everest Advanced Base Camp in Tibet. I am up here with our 24 person SummitClimb.com team at 6400 meters (21,000 feet) and it is very exciting to be here Our team represents ten nations. The weather is sunny and beautiful, and as soon as the winds slow a bit, we will be climbing to the summit. I hope you will wish us luck and it would be great if you were here! The winds have been blowing, but still we have managed to make some good progress and put in a camp and slept several nights at 7500 meters. Our group of 18 Nepalese and Tibetan Sherpas have been working hard to prepare the route and all of the camps up to 8300 meters, and we are now ready to go for the summit in the next few days. All of our team members are happy and healthy at the moment, and we are fattening up on excellent food and lots of hot drinks. Please wish us well and we will keep you informed. All the best for now, from Daniel Mazur and all of us at SummitClimb.com

...

Summit Climb Everest 2004 Dispatch 8


5/14/2004: Hello this is Ryan Waters, one of the leaders with the SummitClimb.com team at ABC on the north side of Mount Everest. As Dan reported earlier most of our logistics are in place and our team, along with all the other teams, are impatiently waiting for a good weather window to make a summit push. Each day the rumor mill starts up and we hear conflicting weather reports, some predicting good weather to come, while the next predicts snow storms. Many members have taken the opportunity to catch a land cruiser or turnip truck down to any number of small towns in Tibet to take advantage of the lower altitudes, change in food, or one of the Tibetan discos that are sure to provide interesting entertainment. After returning to Chinese Base Camp, people enjoy the relative comfort of BC, before once again making the trek up to intermediate base camp. Here our committed cook Sangay has been quick to serve up a bowl of "RA RA" noodles and to fend off the countless Tibetan yak herders trying to poach food from our camp! As I report this, most members are in ABC watching the weather, climbing higher on the mountain or making a game plan for a summit attempt. Troy, Felix, Arnold, and Tim S. are down in BC taking a final rest before coming back up for the last time. It has been a long expedition and people are remaining patient. The distance between Base Camp and ABC is long and the members are trying to stay high, climbing up through the high camps and hoping to get a shot at the summit soon. I plan on climbing high on the mountain for the next few days watching the weather, acclimatizing in the highest camps and hopefully making a summit attempt very soon. Thanks for all of the support from EverestNews.com, friends, family and sponsors. From all of us here at the SummitClimb.com Advanced Base Camp this is Ryan Waters saying we hope to have some interesting news for you soon.

...

Summit Climb Everest 2004 Dispatch 9


5/18/2004: NOTE THIS REPORT CAME FORM ANOTHER TEAM, THEREFORE PLEASE CONSIDER IT UNCONFIRMED. Hopefully, in a few days we can get the team's report.

This morning at 10.45AM (May 18th, 2004) Chinese time 4 climbers and 1 sherpa from the SummitClimb expedition led by Dan Mazur, reached the summit of Chomolungma via the standard North East Ridge route.

The summiters names are:

John Mislow

Lapka Temba

Franck Pitula

Thomas Haines

Ryan Waters

Congratulations to these 5 men on a job well done! More SummitClimb members will be making attempts in the next few days if this wonderfully fine weather holds up.

...

Summit Climb Everest 2004 Dispatch 10

5/21/2004: Dear EverestNews.com Thanks for all of the great work you are doing in telling the story of climbing Everest.

Here are the dates, names, and local origins of the summiters in our two succesful SummitClimb.com teams (so far, as we plan to continue trying):

18 May, 2004:

Thomas Haines, Colorado, USA.

Ryan Waters, Georgia, USA.

Franck Pitula, Lyon, France.

John Mislow, Chicago, USA.

Lakpa Temba Sherpa, Kulima, Nepal.

Nurbu Tsipe, Tashi Tsom, Tibet

Dorje Kasang, Old Tingri, Tibet

20 May, 2004

Andre Bredenkamp, Capetown, South Africa.

Lakpa Chiri Sherpa, Kulima, Nepal.

The last few days have been filled with many challenges and achievements. After a number of days of patient waiting at 6400m, a group of us made an all-out summit sprint to take advantage of a brief weather window. The team departed at 0130h on May 18 - brisk winds, pitch black, and nothing but our headlamps to guide our way up from 8300m to the Yellow Band. Daniel Mazur stayed in the high camp to help the team on their way and coordinate the crucial Tibetan part of the team. After negotiating the slick limestone of the Yellow Band, we gained the summit ridge after the first step. The Ridge is very exposed with cornices dropping off 3000m to the left and 2000m on the right. Not a good time to slip, and especially challenging since we were wearing crampons (skittering across icy limestone in utter darkness is a very sobering experience). Onward we pushed, up to the mildly technical but quickly overcome second step. After picking our lines carefully, we were standing on the top of the second step and trotting quickly towards the third step. A few hours later we (John, Lakpa Temba Sherpa, Frank, Ryan, Thomas) were standing on top of the highest peak in the world; great views, exhaustion, and elation. Nurbu Tsipe and Dorje Kasang followed a few hours later.

A quick stay at the top and we were ready to descend. As we downclimbed the summit pyramid dihedral, we ran into a number of climbers that were still making their way up to the summit. We found out later that these climbers were members of the unfortunate Korean team that tragically lost two of their members that day. Our deepest sympathies go out to the fallen climbers' loved ones. Soon after we descended to safety at the North Col and ABC we were informed of another loss; a Japanese climber. It is a sobering reminder of how ruthless the mountain can be.

The second wave of climbers was not as fortunate with the weather as the first - gale force winds, whiteout conditions, subzero temperatures, and hostile surface conditions conspired to make further attempts highly difficult and hazardous. However, despite fierce weather, our Andre Bredenkamp from South Africa became the first South African male to summit from the North Face. Braving untoward conditions with the help of Lakpa Chiri Sherpa, Andre has made it into the record books - and is currently making his way down to ABC safely. Hats off to you!

The final summit assault teams are planning on making their attack at the earliest sign of fair weather, perhaps in the next day or two. Oxygen and other essentials are moving into place and we send our very best wishes for a safe successful summit bid.

Thank You Very Much, Cheers, Yours Sincerely, from John Mislow, Thomas Haines, Duane Morrison, and all of us at SummitClimb.com

...

Ryan Waters' Everest summit report: Summit Climb Everest 2004 Dispatch


5/23/2004: Dear EverestNews.com, thanks for the great work you are doing at EverestNews.com Here is Ryan Water's account of the aftermath of his summit ascent. Thanks for sharing this with everyone! Hello from ABC on the North side of Mt. Everest. Although my command of the Tibetan language is lacking, I feel confident that I just made a good transaction with a porter who is carrying my duffels down the 24 km trail to Base Camp. As I pack my backpack for the hike out, I feel many emotions all at once. I feel elated that I made the summit, fortunate to have caught the early weather window, anxious for my fellow teammates who continue to plot their summit bids, and ready for good food, beverages, and the first real shower in 2 months. It has been quite an experience and I am glad to have shared it with a quality expedition team and I wish the best to all the remaining climbers on the mountain. I would like to personally thank the following organizations for their support, SummitClimb.com, Patagonia (for support of outdoor professionals), Wild Things, CBS Sports Morganton, NC, Piccolinos Restaraunt Oxford, MS, Southern Staircase Atlanta, GA, and The North Carolina Outward Bound School Instructor Expedition Fund. I must now hit the trail to try and beat the hundreds of yaks leaving ABC with other expeditions equipment. Thanks for your support at EverestNews.com, I am going to Kathmandu! Ryan Waters asst. leader SummitClimb.com Everest Tibet Expedition.

... ...

The South African Everest summit report: Summit Climb Everest 2004 Dispatch


5/23/2004: Here is the story of the first South African man to reach the summit of Everest from Tibet (Andre is the fifth South African t reach the summit of Everest, in total.

As anticipated life has been exciting. The three of us started our summit bid about 10 days ago. On the first day above ABC we discovered that Mike's cough was a serious lung infection. He generously decided to turn back to allow us the best opportunity. We made the North Col on the 16th of May. The following day we proceeded to the next camp at 7,600 meters, which was the most difficult day experienced yet. Lots of snow the whole way. We found that the tents were pitched on very steep ground and even getting in and out of the tents was a difficult undertaking. We spent a few hours melting snow to create water and boiled up a hot packet of dehydrated food.

The next day we proceeded to the highest camp in the world located at 8,300 meters and predictably not a place for the faint hearted! We arrived at camp at 1700 hours and left for our summit bid at midnight. All the climbers attempting to summit on this day probably numbered 70.At the end of the day Andre and 15 others were successful in achieving the ultimate summit goal. Unfortunately three lives were lost on the same day. Summit day started at 12:00 midnight local time. It was tough but progress was made until just before dawn when Chris had a fall which left him some 20 ft below the fixed lines. In the process he lost his Ice Axe. Although no bones were broken his normally abundant confidence was shaken. Following a group discussion, and although a mere 250vertical meters from the summit the Sherpa indicated there was still a further 7 hours to go, Chris elected to terminate his bid and return to camp. Andre proceeded with Lakpa the Sherpa and managed to summit at 1410 hours on Thursday, May 20th. After 20 minutes on the top in appalling blizzard conditions , they returned to the 8,300 meter camp which they finally reached at 2230 hours, predictably absolutely exhausted. Chris had remained in the camp although everyone else had left due to an avalanche threat.

Andre and Chris then proceeded to rapidly descend back to Advanced Base Camp over the next 2 days and arrived exhausted. Chris has first degree frostbite on his feet which will take many months to heal. Andre has a cracked rib together with various bruises from numerous tumbles.

Mike has just started a summit bid as it is predicted that the weather will provide a window. He is going with a group of 8 climbers from our party who have all been waiting for this opportunity. Chris had wanted to return with Mike, however the frostbite prohibited this chance.

We have discovered this mountain is very challenging with a great number of factors beyond one's control. Looking forward to seeing everyone back home soon and if possible logistically we hope to home 1 or 2 days sooner than anticipated.

Written By Chris Drummond and Andre Bredenkamp, Cape Town, South Africa

...

The Prentice Everest Summit report: Summit Climb Everest 2004 Dispatch


5/23/2004:

The following is the unedited account of the Prentice summit attempt...

4 out of 14.5!! [?? must be a Prentice code]

This is just another Everest story, It started on Sunday 16th May we had done all our acclimatisation walks/climbs gone low to allow body regeneration and repair and where back with vengeance for the summit, we climbed up to the north col in glorious sunshine it looked like the satellite phone text forecasts we had received had been right the weather was good, then a big problem, Ian started throwing up for England not good over 4 miles up, a desperate radio call to Doc John Mislow left Ian eating a cocktail of drugs sat up bolt up right in the tent and on oxygen, it worked although the next morning Ian judged himself to weak to climb higher so an extra day recovering at the col it was, no problem. We moved higher to 7700mts to a perfect camp site complete with snow field for drinking, Ian still felt rough but was positive about his recovery we moved up again this time into the death zone 8300 there's only 5 mountains higher in the world and we were camping! it took us ages but after settling on top of our sleeping bags in full climbing gear harness boots the lot we rested and drank all the tang (squash) we could, each of us John Briggs, Ian Prentice, Garth Miller and myself all thinking about the biggest day of our lives now only hours away. The plan was simple get up at 11pm and be out the tents by 12pm, climb up to the top of the north east ridge traverse it climb the three "steps" (Technical rock obstacles) safely complete the Mushroom traverse then the last snow ridge (not in that order) and then bask in the glory of the highest place on planet earth.....

12:25pm: Not bad as anybody who knows us knows were always late, were out of the tent, there's a snake of maybe 40 lights ahead of us already, after an hour of extreme effort climbing with no style at all an emotional Ian comes to me "I can't go on" the sickness had got the better of him "I've got to go back", ever since Mount Blanc several years ago we said we would never split up on a mountain, but now what? I did what all hard Everest climbers would do, started crying, 2 years of planning training and sacrifice was over 500 vertical meters from the top of the world.

I rang my girlfriend for advice she didn't answer... then of course my other brother Stuart, after 30 seconds of fact filling in the answer came, go back its only a mountain this is life or death for Ian. I looked at Ian he knew straight away "no way" I going down with Loda (Our Tibetan porter with promise who we were taking to the summit) for five minutes we cried and talked about the implications of this decision, on I went, myself ,John Briggs, Garth miller and Pemba Galsing (Nepalese Sherpa extraordinaire) I don't remember much of the climb but it was physically hard as just living is at that altitude, I gained the ridge with just enough light from my head lamp to see I was on a cornice standing in china hanging over Nepal over 5 miles up .... time to switch on or I wont ever see this stuff in the light on the way back.

Where's John ? I asked Pemba, John catch us up he very fast came the answer, no he's only got a Tikka (small L.E.D head lamp) in my self pity I had climbed the whole route with out even looking around for my mates how bad am I first my own brother now this dam.

In the distance I saw a small glow thank god it must be John, I shouted, it was, 10 minutes later John fell in a heap next to us, what no way! John was always the mountain goat of the group how could this be? I fed him a High 5 energy gel his lips were blue and his eyes looked sunk as he explained he was using more and more energy to climb until he couldn't go on after ten minutes of heavy breathing repaying his oxygen debt he heard piiiiiissssssstt his hose from his regulator had dislodged he was getting no oxygen, this had caused him to breath heavier and heavier as the cold air hit the back of his throat this had triggered a massive asthma attack as well, only his fitness had kept him alive I'm ok now lets go, what about Garth?

Garth had had problems with his oxygen set for days it transpires as he was climbing the mask kept fouling his view whilst climbing this isn't good causing him on one tricky bit to abseil back down and rip the mask off, on the next go, same thing this time he hyperventilated causing a build up of carbon dioxide in the mask the out come, pure terror as he couldn't breathe.... the sense of self preservation prevailed he turned back. The party now of three myself John and Pemba headed for the first step, John turned to Pemba "am I going to slow?" yes came the answer I thought so I going back (John replied), we all looked at each other now what I looked at John the oxygen thing had hit him hard take Pemba and get going "no way you take him he knows the way to the summit" I knew that should of been the end of our summit bid but how hard can the last few hundred meters be? a reluctant John and Pemba turned and disappeared. The North face now seemed like the angry side of the highest mountain in the world I knew what to do, get my head down summit as early as possible this would give me the best chance of getting back in the morning typically the best weather for the last few days, it was only once on top did I realize I had just climbed the first step then in the distance I saw the second recognizable from miles away as an 80 feet obstacle to the summit given as the reason for early summit failures I had special gloves, studied accounts of people who had climbed it, this to me was the last challenge if I could climb this on my own in the dark the summit would be rightfully be mine I could stand tall and tell the story with pride, off I went then a problem this traversing was actually quite difficult a few times I found myself hanging on by my finger tips and crampon points with only a few feet of light the drop might be 10 feet it might be 5000 feet a lone climber, Italian (I think) once appeared and learnt from one such foray by choosing a different route my appeals for help went a hypoxic long way. I slowed down at last the second step, once at the bottom I decided to stash one of my 3ltr oxygen bottles this would reduce the weight I had to climb with the only problem was I didn't have any rope so I made a whole a whole in the "cliff" and placed the bottle with every intension of retrieving it on the way back...

To my surprise I heard voices behind me an American couple (I think) by the time I had sorted my rucksack out (its tricky hanging on ropes with big gloves on if you drop it that's it!!!) they had disappeared up, my turn then the second step, I looked at the ropes carefully the black and white one looked good I hooked on my Jumar 40 seconds later I was standing on a snow rock ledge looking at a ladder, I had been told of people who fell whilst trying to get from the ladder to the shelf to the right and how its 2 moves too get off it, I collected the black and white rope again and rung after rung up I went now at the very top I was holding a sort of rope extension stuck my foot out onto a 4inch lug hold and was standing on top of the second step, was that it no way.

As I rounded the corner there it was in the morning twilight the summit of Mount Everest I now realized I had no idea where to go just because you can see the top it doesn't mean you can get there. I sat down with exhaustion.

As my eyes grew accustomed to the growing light I could see a couple in front of me about 100mts great they know the way I thought they climbed the third step slowly I could see the ropes blowing in the wind from just behind them this wasn't good with no rope or climbing partner how was I going to "stick" to the snow slope to the top, I'm not sure if they made it to the top I retreated to some rocks for shelter and to rest then I remembered there was some South Africans I knew Chris, Mike and Aundray going for the summit I could wait for them, alot of time elapsed I'm not sure how much because altitude is like that in the distance I saw some head lights was I them? I walked back no small feet when I knew it would be back up hill to the summit it wasn't them it was a Japanese group an uncomfortable silence immediately took hold there's only one reason a lone bloke 150 mtrs below the summit of Everest would approach and that's for help. I sat next to them, then I remembered I had been given a radio by Pemba as we parted I got it out the batteries where frozen along with all my water my camera even my spare hat and gloves were rock hard I started the conversation can I use your radio.... no what's wrong with yours?, batteries, we have spare I looked at the group with full face masks and goggles it was going to be hard to infiltrate after all it could kill them, with new batteries in hand I thanked them and headed back towards the summit.

I radioed Ian "I'm at the base of the summit pyramid! I can almost touch the top" I think I thought he would be pleased.... he wasn't I cant remember the conversation but it involved the kind of talk you would expect between two brothers one about to be blown form Everest to his death, Dan Mazur was in a Sherpa tent and over heard the conversation and added his twenty years of experience "come down its not worth it"

Once again I retreated to some rocks and rang my girlfriend and again I can't remember the conversation but she told me since I was crying (again s#*t) going on about it was so close .... I think its called summit fever Back at the second step, abseil, I know how to do this it just seems not quite right, down the first pitch I think I'll just rest here a bit and sleep.... maybe a should be getting back it took another life time to decide to use the rope I was always going to use! down I went straight past my oxygen bottle ! there was no way I was going to climb back up for it fine or no fine now this traverse stuff better rest first sleep...move again its getting pretty cold then, Andy we must go low Pemba had climbed back on a one man rescue mission in the two hours I had traveled only 150-200 mts and was in a pretty bad way having now not drank for 6 hours used countless calories and my nose had blocked depriving me of oxygen through my nasal canula, things weren't looking good it use to be said you had a better chance of being rescued from the moon than the top of Everest this was now being tested! You cant rescue people in the same way on Everest as on other mountains no stretchers no helicopters you have to talk them into rescuing themselves only themselves can abseil and walk and climb.

I fell in the tent at 8300mts I have vague memories of Very MANLY tears being shed before being dragged down out of the death zone to 7700mts this act of pure heroism by Pemba Galsing almost certainly saved my life no other climber could of got there that fast and help with the rope and foot work with that dedication knowing if I fell there was a good chance 24 crampon points would come crashing down on him although I did notice I wasn't allowed my ice axe again!

The journey down to ABC was very slow with me having to stop very, very frequently to rest with the high light being when I fell in a crevasse by the north col I was roped luckily so just an incontinence its amazing how much trouble tired eyes and legs get you into in a place where on the day I nearly summated Mount Everest 14 people claimed to but 4 died trying to get down a Japanese person and a Korean where just two of them.....

I could of course claimed to of summated after all there are many disputed summit claims my route description to other summiteers is complete except the 50-100mts of snow not the hardest thing to make up it was snowing so even if my camera hadn't frozen blank pictures prove little, I do feel very lucky to have climbed high on Everest and lived to tell the tale the this story is of course only part of the bigger story involving other dead climbers and other things wch my family just aren't ready for yet. Thank you for reading, Andrew Prentice

...

Dan Mazur and team leave for the summit of Everest: Summit Climb Everest 2004 Dispatch


Dan Mazur and 7 climbers (plus Sherpas) have headed up to the North col for the next in wave of summit attempts from this team... 3/2004:

Earlier report:

5/21/2004: Dear EverestNews.com Thanks for all of the great work you are doing in telling the story of climbing Everest.

Here are the dates, names, and local origins of the summiters in our two succesful SummitClimb.com teams (so far, as we plan to continue trying):

18 May, 2004: 10:45 AM Chinese time

Thomas Haines, Colorado, USA.

Ryan Waters, Georgia, USA.

Franck Pitula, Lyon, France.

John Mislow, Chicago, USA.

Lakpa Temba Sherpa, Kulima, Nepal.

Nurbu Tsipe, Tashi Tsom, Tibet

Dorje Kasang, Old Tingri, Tibet

20 May, 2004

Andre Bredenkamp, Capetown, South Africa.

Lakpa Chiri Sherpa, Kulima, Nepal.

The last few days have been filled with many challenges and achievements. After a number of days of patient waiting at 6400m, a group of us made an all-out summit sprint to take advantage of a brief weather window. The team departed at 0130h on May 18 - brisk winds, pitch black, and nothing but our headlamps to guide our way up from 8300m to the Yellow Band. Daniel Mazur stayed in the high camp to help the team on their way and coordinate the crucial Tibetan part of the team. After negotiating the slick limestone of the Yellow Band, we gained the summit ridge after the first step. The Ridge is very exposed with cornices dropping off 3000m to the left and 2000m on the right. Not a good time to slip, and especially challenging since we were wearing crampons (skittering across icy limestone in utter darkness is a very sobering experience). Onward we pushed, up to the mildly technical but quickly overcome second step. After picking our lines carefully, we were standing on the top of the second step and trotting quickly towards the third step. A few hours later we (John, Lakpa Temba Sherpa, Frank, Ryan, Thomas) were standing on top of the highest peak in the world; great views, exhaustion, and elation. Nurbu Tsipe and Dorje Kasang followed a few hours later.

A quick stay at the top and we were ready to descend. As we downclimbed the summit pyramid dihedral, we ran into a number of climbers that were still making their way up to the summit. We found out later that these climbers were members of the unfortunate Korean team that tragically lost two of their members that day. Our deepest sympathies go out to the fallen climbers' loved ones. Soon after we descended to safety at the North Col and ABC we were informed of another loss; a Japanese climber. It is a sobering reminder of how ruthless the mountain can be.

The second wave of climbers was not as fortunate with the weather as the first - gale force winds, whiteout conditions, subzero temperatures, and hostile surface conditions conspired to make further attempts highly difficult and hazardous. However, despite fierce weather, our Andre Bredenkamp from South Africa became the first South African male to summit from the North Face. Braving untoward conditions with the help of Lakpa Chiri Sherpa, Andre has made it into the record books - and is currently making his way down to ABC safely. Hats off to you!

The final summit assault teams are planning on making their attack at the earliest sign of fair weather, perhaps in the next day or two. Oxygen and other essentials are moving into place and we send our very best wishes for a safe successful summit bid.

Thank You Very Much, Cheers, Yours Sincerely, from John Mislow, Thomas Haines, Duane Morrison, and all of us at SummitClimb.com

...

 

Franck Pitula's gripping account of his Everest Summit ascent: Summit Climb Everest 2004 Dispatch


5/23/2004:

Here is Franck Pitula's gripping account of his summit ascent for your French speaking audience. I think they will enjoy it very much.

On the 18th of May there were 5 people on our team who arrived at the summit of Everest via the North face: 3 Americans, 1 French (myself) and 1 sherpa, all with oxygen. We have seen uncertain weather windows, but it paid off. The second wave had little chance as ultimately all things said snow. At the end of a very long effort, a South African from our group has all the same arrived at the summit. The others had to give up en route. This is something, but it is for the best: we arrived at advance base camp alive and in near pretty good health. During these last days, several people died in the same places where we have gone. Everest is not reputed to be greatly technical, but it does not remain less dangerous. To come down, it took me 3 days; I remained very concentrated. A bad slide that happened 2 times without consequence can quickly turn dramatic. The place called the "Second Step" is particularly difficult, both going up and coming down. I implemented all of my knowledge as a mountaineer. A Korean chose the bad fixed rope, and he remains there! Everest is a terrible experience, and sometimes although one hears about its banality and ease, this is not true at all.

Today some others are again up high, but their chance of success is weak; there's a lot of snow. A third team waits, but the weather forecasts are pessimistic. In all, we have 24 candidates and Sherpas who would like to make the summit. For we 6 who have succeeded, it's over. The others wait with hope for a weather window. They can't wait more than 3 days to leave for high up because to make the summit requires about 5 days under 7000m. But the motivation is waning because monsoons approach. One of the great difficulties on Everest is the waiting, while watching health and motivation. This might appear petty, but it is more difficult than speaking about the technique that one has or does not have, which is much simpler.

Little by little, I realize my climb. I believe that I am the 28th Frenchman to have summited Everest via the North, and the 60th overall (to be confirmed). It is nothing. I think that I will benefit better from all of this once the expedition is over.

Franck Pitula, direct from advance base camp on Everest, 6400m. Saturday, 22 May 2004, 11.46 AM. Peking.

Ca y est, le 18 mai 5 personnes de notre equipe sont arrivees au sommet de l'Everest par son versant nord : 3 americains, 1 francais, moi-meme, et un sherpa, tous avec oxygene. Nous avons mis a profit une incertaine fenetre meteo, mais elle c'est averee payante. La 2 vague a eu moins de chance, le temps au lieu de se degager est en fin de compte reste a la neige. Au terme d'un tres long effort, un sud africain de notre groupe est tout de meme parvenu au sommet. Les autres ont du abandonner en route.

Ceci est une chose, mais il y a mieux : nous sommes redescendu au au camp de base avance vivants et en a peu pres bonne sante. Durant ces derniers jours, personnes sont mortes dans les endroits memes ou nous sommes passe. L'Everest a beau ne pas etre repute technique, il n'en demeure pas moins dangereux. Pour redescendre, ce qui m'a pris 3 jours, j'ai du reste tres concentre. Une mauvaise glissade, ce qui m'est arrive 2 fois sans consequences, peut vite s'averer dramatique. L'endroit dit le "2eme step" est particulierement difficile, a la montee comme a la descente. J'y ai mis en oeuvre tout mon savoir faire montagnard. Un coreen a choisi la mauvaise corde fixe, il y est reste ! L'Everest est une experience terrible, et bien que l'on entende parfois parler de banalite et de facilite, ce n'est pas vrai du tout.

Aujourd'hui d'autres sont encore en altitude, mais leur chance de succes sont faibles, il a beaucoup neige. Une 3eme equipe attend, mais les previsions meteo sont pessimistes. En tout nous sommes 24 pretendants + les sherpas qui aimeraient faire le sommet. Pour nous 6 qui avons reussi c'est termine, d'autres attendent avec espoir une fenetre meteo, il ne reste plus que 3 jours pour partir en altitude car faire le sommet demande environ 5 jours au dessus de 7000m. Mais la motivation s'emousse car la mousson approche. Une des grosses difficultes de l'Everest est l'attente, en gardant la sante et la motivation. Cela peut paraitre anodin, mais c'est plus difficile que de faire parler de la technique que l'on a ou l'on a pas, ce qui et beaucoup plu simple.

Petit a petit je realise mon ascension. Je crois que je suis le 28eme francais a avoir fait l'Everest par le nord, et le 60eme en tout ( a confirmer ). Ce n'est pas rien. Je pense que je profiterai mieux de tout cela une fois l'expedition terminee.

Franck pitula en direct du camp de base avance de l'Everest a 6400m d'altitude, le samedi 22 mai 2004 a 11h46 heure de Pekin.

...

 

Waiting out the high winds on Everest: Summit Climb Everest 2004 North Side


Update 5/25/2004: Dan Mazur and around 7 climbers (plus Sherpas) are waiting out the high winds at 7600 meters. Two have attempted to go to 8300 meters. Others are with them... This is "group 3" for the SummitClimb expedition headed by Dan Mazur.

5/2Dan Mazur and 7 climbers (plus Sherpas) have headed up to the North Col for the next in wave of summit attempts from this team... 3/2004.


 

Americans Summit Everest on May 26th!: Summit Climb Everest 2004 North Side


Update 5/26/2004: SummitClimb Summits Everest again!

Tim Horvath - USA and Dr. Eric Meyer - USA, are reported to EverestNews.com as Summiters of Mt Everest!!! On May 26th. They left high camp at 2.30am and summited about 12:30 pm along with three Sherpas climbers, Tenzing, Tenzing and Gombu.

Tim Horvath, we are told summited Kangchenjunga about 8 years ago. Please treat this as unconfirmed until the team reports in, but it appears we have good news.! More Summitclimb climbers are heading up today from ABC.

Update 5/25/2004: Dan Mazur and around 7 climbers (plus Sherpas) are waiting out the high winds at 7600 meters. Two have attempted to go to 8300 meters. Others are with them... This is "group 3" for the SummitClimb expedition headed by Dan Mazur.

Update: Dan Mazur and 7 climbers (plus Sherpas) have headed up to the North Col for the next in wave of summit attempts from this team... 3/2004.

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More Summits of Everest and more headed up! SummitClimb Everest 2004 North Side


Update 5/27/2004: 27 May 2004 from Tim Horvath and Eric Meyer: Dear EverestNews.com, thanks to you for all of the great work you are doing at EverestNews.com On May 26th, Eric Meyer of Steamboat Springs, CO, Tim Horvath of Cherry Valley, NY, Tenzi Sherpa of Rolwaling, Galu Sherpa of Taur, and Tenzing Sherpa of Patale summitted Mt. Everest via the Tibet- Northeast Ridge. After leaving ABC on the 24th we reached 7600m. The next day we fought high winds to reach 8300m after five and a half hours. On the morning of the 26th the winds were still 25-35 mph with temps 10-15 below F, but we were lucky because the skies were clear. At 4:30 AM we left for the summit. After a cold start we arrived at the summit at 12:08 PM with no other parties on the route that day. After 20 minutes on the summit we made the 8000 foot descent back to ABC. Congratulations to Eric and Tim, and we wish the best of luck to our current summit attempters: Tim Spears, Arnold Coster and Felix Berg, from Daniel Mazur and all of us at SummitClimb.com

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Four More Summits of Everest: SummitClimb Everest 2004 North Side


Update 5/29/2004: Dispatch for 27 May, 2004:

The following SummitClimb.com staff members reached the summit today at 12:08 pm:

Jangbu Sherpa from Patale, Nepal

Phuri Sherpa from Patale, Nepal

Yunden from Tingri, Tibet

Wangdu from Tingri, Tibet

We congratulate our staff in their strong efforts to climb their countries' highest peak!

Thank you very much from all of us at SummitClimb.com

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Mt Everest 2004: Ropes removed below 7100 meters on 28 May, 2004


Update 5/29/2004: This is a four part email, the first part (1) describing the removal of the rope, the second (2) describing who is still above the missing sections, the third part (3) describing what has been done to try to correct the situation, and the fourth (4) describing what ropes have been fixed on the entire route by all teams.

PART 1: The following notes are taken from an interview conducted on 29 May, 2004, with:

Ang Gyalu Sherpa from Patale

and

Chiring Sherpa from Rolwaling

On 28 May, 2004, starting at about Noon and continuing into the afternoon, 7 of Russell Brice's Sherpas, including Tibetan Guide School staff, led by Phura Tashi Sherpa from Khumjung, including Lakpa Chirri from Namche, and including Tibetan climber Tenzing, removed ropes below 7100 meters, for at least 600 meters down slope. This 60 meters included removal of ropes for 100 meters above the north col camp and 500 meters below the north col camp. When questioned, this group of 7 said they were acting under the orders of Russell Brice.

Before Mid-day on the 28th, a group of Russell Brices Sherpas had led a group of North Col Trekkers to the top of the North Col. After the North Col trekkers went down, the 7 Sherpas cut the ropes.

The method for removing the rope was apparently cutting with knives. Some of the ropes (newer sections) were cut away and rolled up and put in rucksacks to be carried down. Older pieces of rope were cut and thrown to the side of the route and are still visible.

The origin of ropes cut include ropes fixed by the Korean Team, ropes fixed by the SummitClimb.com team, and ropes fixed by Russell Brice's team.

No warning was given before the ropes were cut. Some Sherpas from teams other than Russell Brice's climbed the ropes in the morning, and coming down in the afternoon, were surprised to find the ropes had been removed.

The terrain the ropes were fixed on were snow slopes up to 55 degrees, including a near vertical ice step of about 7 meters in height.

PART 2: The following people are currently above the section of rope that has been cut, and they are involved in trying to reach the summit:

Felix Berg, Arnold Coster, Tim Spears, Jangbu Sherpa, Lakpa Sherpa, Tenzing Sherpa, Awang (Tibetan Climber), Pubu Tsering (Tibetan Climber), and others.

PART 3: What has been done to correct the situation: The SummitClimb.com team has tried to place their remaining rope over the missing sections, and have succeeded in placing 400 meters of rope over some of the more dangerous parts. Their task has been complicated by the fact that they fixed much of their rope early in the expedition. Fortunately, some was held in reserve.

PART 4: The following elevations on the mountains had ropes fixed to them by Sherpas and Tibetan climbers from the following teams:

6600-7000m (North Col) ropes fixed by: Russell Brice, SummitClimb.com, and Korean Team.

7000-7900 ropes fixed by: Indian Navy Expedition, and Russell Brice

7900-8300 ropes fixed by: SummitClimb.com, IMG/AC

8300-8500: SummitClimb.com

1st Step, 8500 meters: SummitClimb.com

2nd Step, 8600 meters: SummitClimb.com

Snow Pyramid, 8700 meters: SummitClimb.com

Just below the summit: 8800 meters: SummitClimb.com

As can be seen from the above, the Russell Brice expedition was involved in fixing the ropes below and around the North Col, and other expeditions fixed the ropes above that. It must be mentioned that the Russell Brice expedition fixed a ladder on the second step, which was paid for by "Roy" a kind gentleman from South Africa. Thank you very much.

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Seven Summits on Everest on the 51st anniversary of the first ascent of Everest by Tenzing and Hillary: SummitClimb Mt Everest 2004


Dispatch May 30th, 2004:

We are honoured to announce that on 29 May, 2004 (51st anniversary of the first ascent of Everest by Tenzing and Hillary), the following members summited:

1. Felix Berg, Berlin, Germany at 750 am (Chinese time)

2. Awang Norbu, Nyalam, Tibet at 750 am

3. Pubu Tsering, Nyalam, Tibet at 750 am

4. Tashi Namgyal, Tingri, Tibet at 750 am

5. Arnold Coster, Rotterdam, Netherlands at 850 am

6. Lakpa Sherpa, Norbugaon, Nepal at 850 am

7. Tenzing Sherpa, Norbugaon, Nepal at 850 am

We send them and their families, friends, and colleagues the heartiest congratulations. Thank you very much, Yours Sincerely, from Daniel Mazur and all of us at SummitClimb.com

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Arnold Coster Summits Everest, his summit report: SummitClimb Mt Everest 2004


Dear EverestNews.com, Thanks again for all the great work you are doing at EverestNews.com. I know there are some eager Dutch readers out there, and I was wondering if you could post this dispatch in the Dutch language. Thanks!!!

[Yes we shall in Dutch and English!]

Another Dutch climber. That makes three this year !

Everest ascent by Arnold Coster on May 29th.

We went for the summit again on May 27th. After two unsuccessful attempts and a big storm on the mountain we had descended to ABC. We stayed there for two days to rest and went up again for the final attempt with mixed feelings: the season was almost over! Together with Felix Berg, Tenzing Sherpa, Lakpa Sherpa, Awang Norbu, Purbu Tsering and Tashi Namgyal we climbed to Camp 1 on the North Col. We hoped the weather would stay nice so we could climb to Camp 2 on 7600 meter, to Camp 3 on 8300 meter and then to the summit. After a good night in Camp 1 we tried to go to Camp 3 in one push. But we encountered a blizzard again and had to spend the night in Camp 2. The next day there was no weather improvement, but we ascended to Camp 3 anyway: it was our last attempt. In Camp 3 I waited in my tent and hoped for the wind to calm down. At 2 AM we left. There was still strong wind and it was very cold, but we could go. After climbing through the cold and windy night the sun reached us on the ridge. I tried to absorb the warmth of the first sunlight. By that time we had reached the Second Step: the key part of the climb. I found it very easy to climb and from that moment I was sure to reach the summit. One hour later I was on the summit and enjoyed the view on the famous mountain peaks around us. It was a perfect summit day, I was alone with my team members Felix Berg, Awang Norbu, Pubu Tsering, Tashi Namgyal, Lakpa Sherpa, and Tenzing Sherpa. We had no wind and it was superb!

Beklimming Everest door Arnold Coster op 29 mei 2004

Op 27 mei zijn we toch nog vertrokken om nog een toppoging te wagen. Na twee eerdere pogingen en compleet van de berg gewaaid te zijn en met onze staart tussen onze benen weer afgedaald naar het ABC. Na twee dagen rust en met een gemengd gevoel, zijn we toch nog naar boven gegaan om een laatste poging te wagen, het seizoen in tenslotte bijna aan zijn einde en dit is echt de laatste kans ! Samen met Felix Berg, Tenjen sherpa, Lakpha sherpa, Awang Norbu, Purbu Shering, Tashi Namgel zijn we naar de north-col vertrokken (kamp 1) in de hoop dat het weer ons gunstig gezind blijft en we door kunnen gaan naar kamp 2 7600 en dan kamp 3 8300m en dan door naar de top. Na een goede nacht in kamp 1, zijn we vertrokken om in een keer door te stoten naar kamp 3 op 8300m, maar onder weg kwamen we natuurlijk weer in de zoveelste blizzard terecht en waren we gedwongen om toch een nacht door te brengen in kamp 2, de volgende dag was het weer nog steeds niet goed, maar zijn we toch in het slechte weer doorgeklommen naar kamp 3, het was tenslotte onze laaste kans. Vol goede hoop heb ik in mijn tent liggen wachten tot de wind gedaald was naar een nineau waar in te klimmen valt. Om 2.00 chineese tijd was het dan zover, de wind was nog wel sterk en het was ijskoud, maar het was klimbaar. Na een nacht ploeteren door de wind en de ijzige kou, breekt de zon dan einderlijk door en verwarm mij aan de eerste zonnestralen. Op dit moment bereiken wij ook 2nd step, de sleutel passage van de klim, ik vond deze verbazend makkelijk en op dit moment wist ik ook dat niets meer tussen mij en de top zou staan. Een uur later stond ik dan ook op de top en genood van het uitzicht van alle beroemde pieken om mij heen ! Dit was de perfekte topdag, naast mijn mede klimmers waren we de enige op de top, geen wind, super ! en voor de mensen bij de Fugro, ik heb ook een sondering op het topje van de wereld

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Felix Berg Summits Everest, his summit report: SummitClimb Mt Everest 2004


I know there are quite a few German readers out there, and I was hoping you could put up this German language dispatch. Thanks Again for all of your fantastic help.

Summit report: May 29th at 2:15am (Chinese time) Arnold Coster (Netherlands), the local Tibetan climbers Awang Norbu, Purbu Tsering, Tashi Namgal, our Sherpas Tenjen and Lakpah and I started from the high camp (8300m) towards the summit. The first hours were quite windy and cold. Climbing the "Yellow Band" to the ridge took some time and there was an certain amount of new snow. Up to to the First Step (30m) I tracked then the Tibetan climbers took over. Shortly afterwards I reached the Second Step (a 20m step with a 7m ladder), from there we four climbed together. Reaching the Third Step we had a beautiful sunrise and it got warmer so we could enjoy the fascinating panorama. After a tiresome snowfield, a short rock passage and the ridge we stood at the summit of Mt. Everest at 7:50am. The view to Lhotse, Makalu, Cho Oyu and the Tibetan Plateau was fantastic. We stayed for about 45 min eating and drinking a little bit, calling basecamp (still asleep) and taking some photos. Descending we met Arnold and our two Sherpas who reached the summit around 9:00am.The following steep terrain forced us again to be really careful. After 3 hours around 11:00am Awang and I reached our tent. After several hours of rest I packed my stuff and helped the Tibetans and the Sherpas to dismantle the camp before continuing our descend. Along the abandoned camps at 7900m and 7600m looking more or less

like "ghost-towns" I reached the North Col where our Sherpa Jangbu waited for me with hot tea and then I went on to the ABC (6400) which I reached around 5:00pm. Till late into the night all climbers of our group reached ABC from where I am writing this e-mail right now.

In German: Gipfelerfolg am Everest

Am 29.Mai um 2:15 chinesischer Zeit sind Arnold Coster von Holland, drei unserer lokalen Bergsteiger von Tibet Awang Norbu, Purbu Tsering, Tashi Namgal zwei unserer Sherpas Tenjen und Lakpah und ich vom letzen Lager (8300m) Richtung Gipfel aufgebrochen. Die ersten Stunden waren recht windig und kalt. Die Kletterei durch das 'Gelbe Band' zum Gipfelgrat zog sich hin und wir hatten einiges an Neuschnee. Bis zur 'ersten Stufe' einem 30m Steilabschnitt spurte ich, dann ueberholten mich unsere drei tibetischen Kletterer. Die 'zweite Stufe' eine 20m Stufe mit einer 7m Leiter ereichte ich kurz danach. Von dort kletterte ich mit den Tibetern zusammen. Als wir die 'dritte Stufe' erreichten ging schliesslich die Sonne auf, es wurde waermer und wir konnten das faszinierende Panorama geniessen. Kurz spaeter, nach einem muehsamen Schneefeld, einer kurzen Felspassage und dem Gipfelgrat stehen wir um 7:50 am Gipfel des Mt.Everest. Die Ausicht war wunderbar mit Blick auf Lhotse, Makalu, Cho Oyu und das weite tibetische Plateau. Wir bleiben 45 Minuten am Gipfel, Trinken und Essen etwas, funken Basislager (das noch schlief) und nehmen einige Fotos. Im Abstieg Treffen wir Arnold und die zwei Sherpas, die etwa gegen 9 Uhr den Gipfel erreichten. Im Abstieg mussten wir nochmals aufpassen, da das Gelaende relativ steil ist. Nach ca. 3 Stunden, gegen 11 Uhr konnten Awang und ich wieder das Zelt erreichen. Nach einigen Stunden Rast packte ich meine Sachen. Ich half den Sherpas und Tibetern mit dem Lagerabbau und machte mich dann auf dem weiteren Abstieg. An den Geisterstadt ahnlichen, da abgebauten Lagern 7900m, 7600m ging es zum Nordsattel (7000m). Dort erwartete mich unser Sherpa Jangbu mit heissem Tea, und kurz spaeter ging ich zum ABC(6400m), dem vorgeschobenen Basislager, das ich gegen 5 Uhr erreichte. Bis spaet in die Nacht trudeln alle von unserer Gipfelpartie im ABC ein. Von dort schreibe ich euch diese e-mail.

mit freundlichen Gruessen, Felix Berg

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Twenty Five Summits of Everest: SummitClimb Mt Everest 2004

I am writing from a peaceful, sunny, and warm Kathmandu. We just returned here yesterday from Tibet. Well, for all of us at SummitClimb.com it has been a challenging and rewarding season on Everest - Tibet - Northside this year. We would like to take his opportunity to thank the members, staff, family, friends, and colleagues who made our success possible. THANK YOU! 9 of our team members, along with 16 of our staff, representing 7 nations, reached the summit of Everest this year:

18 May, 2004:

1. Thomas Haines, Colorado, USA.

2. Ryan Waters, Georgia, USA.

3. Franck Pitula, Lyon, France.

4. John Mislow, Chicago, USA.

5. Lakpa Temba Sherpa, Kulima, Nepal.

6. Nurbu Tsipe, Tashi Tsom, Tibet.

7. Dorje Kasang, Old Tingri, Tibet.

20 May, 2004

8. Andre Bredenkamp, Capetown, South Africa.

9. Lakpa Chiri Sherpa, Kulima, Nepal.

26 May, 2004

10. Tim Horvath, New York, USA.

11. Eric Meyer, Colorado, USA.

12. Gyaluk Sherpa, Taur, Nepal.

13. Tenzi Sherpa, Rolwaling, Nepal.

14. Tenzing Sherpa, Patale, Nepal.

27 May, 2004

15. Jangbu Sherpa, Patale, Nepal.

16. Phuri Sherpa, Patale, Nepal.

17. Yunden, Tingri, Tibet

18. Wangdu, Tingri, Tibet

29 May, 2004

19. Felix Berg, Berlin, Germany.

20. Arnold Coster, Rotterdam, Netherlands.

21. Awang Norbu, Nyalam, Tibet.

22. Pubu Tsering, Nyalam, Tibet.

23. Tashi Namgyal, Tingri, Tibet.

24. Lakpa Sherpa, Norbugaon, Nepal.

25. Tenzing Sherpa, Norbugaon, Nepal.

*all members and staff used 100% guaranteed-certified oxygen systems provided by SummitClimb.com

Once again, our thanks to EverestNews.com for telling our story and hearty congratulations to the summiters, their families, friends and colleagues. Thank you very much, Yours Sincerely, from Daniel Mazur and all of us at SummitClimb.com

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