UK: +44 (0)7810 375400 & USA: +1 360-570-0715 info@summitclimb.com
UK: +44 (0)7810 375400 & USA: +1 360-570-0715

Everest Tibet Training Climb North Col - Camp 1 (Lhakpa-Ri Optional)

  • everest tibet training North col camp in foreground. Background-slope to camp 2, then full route to c3-summit ridge. Photo Dan
  • Northcol Above North Col, way to camp 2. Photo Chris Bailley.
  • everest tibet training Member and Sherpa enjoying near Northcol. Photo Dan
  • everest tibet training Members climbing up in North Col - Photo Biff.
  • everest tibet training Member summiting Northcol. Photo Franz
  • everest tibet training Member enjoying Ice Training in Basecamp. Photo Franz
  • everest tibet training Testing climbing technique in basecamp. Photo Biff
  • everest tibet training Member standing near Northcol. Photo Edwin
  • northcolnews Everest Basecamp Tibet. Photo Dan
.
  • Quick, inexpensive, "easy" way to reach 7000 m / 23,000 ft. See how you feel at altitude on Mt. Everest.

  • Full Service Cost: $13,150, £10,250, €11,950. Add on an ascent of Mount Lhakpa-Ri for $8,850 (Price fixed in $USD. £GBP and €EUR price for convenience only, converted November 27, 2019)

  • Leader David O'Brien and Dan Mazur from UK and USA, 12 Everest expeditions, friendly, organized, and excellent teachers.

  • Dates: 6 April to 30 April 2021 and 20 April to 14 May, 2021. 25 days in Tibet (call for custom dates)

  • Add an exotic and historical trip to the ancient Tibetan city of Lhasa, add $2450.

  • New Option: add on a trip to Mount Lhakpa-Ri, easy and beautiful 7000 meter / 23,000 foot peak located near Everest Advanced Basecamp.
 

 
 

Video by Edmond - Everest Tibet Training Climb North Col . North-col Climb - By Brendan Madden, In Deep Films You Tube Channel and InDeepFilms.com
 
Recent News: Please click here to view news of our expedition. We only have a few places left in the team for next season. Please conact us now to book: info@summitclimb.com . Please also visit our "Archived News" for more stories of past trips.
 
Overview:

The North Col on Everest is 7000 meters/23,000 feet high. It is a spectacular location with incredible views and on main climbing route for Everest from Tibet. The North Col is located on a high snow ridge above advanced basecamp. We teach you everything you need to know to climb to the North Col in special training sessions in base camp. The climbing could be best described as steep walking and easy/moderate climbing with climbers attached to fixed ropes. The dates we have chosen run in conjunction with the exciting spring Everest climbing season. Climbing up to the North Col could qualify you for climbing Everest

LhakpaRi is a pyramidal trekking peak at roughly the same height as the North Col, located across from Everest on the East Rongbuk Glacier.Climbing LhakpaRi could qualify you for climbing Everest
  • Request Info about a trip
  • How to join a team?
Share this:

Mount Lhakpa Ri/North Col Expedition Climbing Cost

Our full-service expedition includes:

What is not included?

  • International flights to/from Kathmandu
  • Mountain climbing rescue and travel insurance
  • Personal climbing equipment and clothing
  • Gratuities for staff
  • Nepalese and Tibetan visas
  • Cost of jeep transportation if leaving early


Camp 1. Photo David

Lhakpa Ri/North Col of Everest Climb Detailed Itinerary

1) Arrive in Kathmandu, 1350 meters (4,429 feet). Go to hotel

2) Kathmandu – Go to Chinese embassy for visa, team orientation meeting, purchasing, packing, visit temples, city tour, shopping. Stay at hotel.

3) Early morning drive to Rusuwaghadi at 2557 meters (8,389 feet). Stay at hotel.

Lhasa option: Fly from Kathmandu to Lhasa or if you are coming from a city in China, arrive in Lhasa on this day.

4) Enter Tibet, drive to Gyirong at 2700 meters (8,858 feet) Stay at hotel.


Lhasa option: Rest in Lhasa, tour Potala Palace and Jokhang Temple, the most sacred building in all of Tibet.


5) Rest and acclimatization in Gyirong. Walk around the local hills. Stay at hotel.


Lhasa option: Drive to Shigatse. Rest and acclimate. Tour the surrounding area. Visit the 15th century Tashilunpo Monastery, the largest active monastic institution in Tibet.


6) Drive to Tingri, 4300 meters 14,108 feet. Stay at hotel.


Lhasa option: Drive to Tingri. Rest and acclimate, tour the surrounding area.


7) Rest & acclimatization in Tingri. Explore surrounding hills and beautiful meadows. See the restoration of the historical Buddhist temples. Stay at hotel.


8) Drive to Chinese basecamp, 5200 meters (17,060 feet). Camp.


9) Rest and acclimatization in Chinese base. Organize equipment and supplies.


10) Acclimatization hike near Chinese base. Meet the Lama and participate in a Puja ceremony.


11) Rest & acclimatization in Chinese base. Organize equipment and supplies.


12) Walk with the yaks halfway to interim camp, 5800 meters (19,029 feet).


13) Rest and acclimatization at interim camp.

14) Rest and acclimatization in interim camp.


15) Walk with the yaks to advanced base camp (ABC) at 6400 meters (20,9997 feet).


16) Training/rest day in ABC.


17) Training/rest day in ABC.


18) Climb partway up the North Col and return, camp in ABC.


19) Climb to the top of the North Col 7,000 meters (22,966 feet). Return to ABC.


20) Extra day in case of weather, acclimatization, etc.


21) Walk down to Basecamp.


22) Early morning drive to Gyirong. Stay at hotel.


23) Early morning drive to Kathmandu. Stay at hotel.

24) In Kathmandu. Final packing, celebration, saying goodbye to new friends.

25) Fly home. Thank you for joining our Mount Everest Training Climb

LhakpaRi add-on

21) Rest Day in ABC.

22) Climb to the summit of LhakpaRi and return to ABC.

23) Extra Day.

24) Walk down to basecamp.

25) Early morning drive to Gyirong. Stay at hotel.

26) Early morning drive to Kathmandu. Stay at hotel.

27) In Kathmandu. Final packing, celebration, saying goodbye to new friends.

28) Fly home. Thank you for joining our LakpaRi add-on.



Fixed rope training. Photo Sam

Lhakpa Ri/North Col Expedition Climbing Leadership & Staff

Leadership: During your full-service expedition, you will benefit from the leadership provided by David O'Brien  David has climbed in the Indian and Nepalese Himalayas as well as in the Alps. He has led expeditions in the high arctic island of Spitsbergen and has a liking for the cold and remote having crossed Greenland by ski. He has organized and led overland trips in Asia and North Africa.

David has been climbing and working with Summit Climb since 2006 and is a thoughtful, considerate leader. He is a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society and lives in London with his partner and child.

Sherpas: We employ some of Nepal, Tibet, and the Karakorum’s best local mountaineers and Sherpas to assist team members in realizing their summit goals. Our friendly and loyal high altitude climbing staff has supported teams to the summits of more than ten of the highest peaks in the Himalaya.

Lhakpa Ri/North Col Expedition Climb - Your Experience & Training

Winter snow walking experience and experience at high altitude is highly recommended. The trip includes brief climbing clinics. We will teach you everything you need to know on a glacier near basecamp. To be successful, proper conditioning is critical to your success on LhakpaRi and the North Col. Team members are expected to be very fit and in good health. Proper training with a focus on long hikes carrying a backpack is essential.

Lhakpa Ri/North Col of Everest Climb - Personal & Team Equipment

Climbing:

  • Climbing harness
  • 5 meters (16 ft.) of 6mm accessory cord
  • Figure 8 abseil/belay device (tube style devices, i.e. ATC will not work on fixed lines)
  • Full size ascender (i.e. PetzlAscention)
  • 2 locking carabiners, 1 large and 1 small
  • 4 non-locking carabiners
  • Ice axe with leash
  • Steel crampons with anti-balling plates
  • Trekking poles
  • Abseiling/Rappelling Gloves

Upper Body:

  • 2 cotton t-shirts
  • 2 synthetic t-shirts
  • 2 long sleeve synthetic shirts
  • Light-weight soft shell jacket
  • Medium weight insulatingjacket (fleece, down, or synthetic)
  • Hard shell jacket with hood, waterproof and breathable (Gore-Tex or similar)
  • Heavy down coat

    • For 6,000m peaks a very warm down coat with hood or an 8,000m coat with hood
    • For 7,000m peaks an 8,000m coat with hood
    • For 8,000m peaks an 8,000m down coat with hood or an 8,000m suit can be used instead

Hands:

  • Lightweight poly-liner gloves
  • Mid-weight soft shell gloves – water/wind resistant
  • Heavy- weight waterproof gloves – Gore-tex shell with removable liner
  • Expedition weight mittens -Gore-tex over mitt matched polar fleece mitt liner

Head:

  • Helmet
  • Warm hat that covers your ears
  • Balaclava
  • Face mask
  • Baseball hat or brimmed sun hat
  • Glacier sunglasses with side shields
  • Ski goggles with light and dark lenses
  • Headlamp with extra batteries and bulbs
  • Buff/neck gaiter
  • Bandana or head scarf (optional)

Lower Body:

  • Synthetic underwear
  • Hiking shorts
  • Hiking pants
  • 2 pair lightweight thermal bottoms
  • Medium or expedition weight thermal bottoms
  • Polar fleece or soft shell pants
  • Waterproof/breathable pants with full side zips (Gore-Tex or similar)
  • Heavy insulating pants

    • For 6,000m peaks: Down or synthetic pants will full zips
    • For 7,000m peaks: 8,000m down pants
    • For 8,000m peaks: 8,000m down pants or a 8,000m suit can be used instead

Feet:

  • Boots

    • For 6,000m peaks: Plastic or composite double boots (Koflach, La SportivaSpantik, etc) Modern waterproof, single boots designed for 4-5,000m peaks may be suitable if they can be worn with 2 pairs of socks and vapor barrier lines and/or they are equipped with overboots
    • For 7,000m: Plastic or composite double boots (Koflach, La SportivaSpantik, etc)
    • For 8,000m peaks: 8,000m boots - One-Sport Millet Everest boots or equivalent

  • Sturdy leather walking boots
  • Trainers, running shoes and/or sandals
  • Down booties (optional)
  • 3 pair med-heavy poly or wool socks
  • 2 pair poly or wool liner socks (optional)
  • Vapor barrier liner socks (optional)
  • 2 pair lightweight trekking socks
  • Cotton socks for in town

Sleeping:

  • Down sleeping bag

    • For 6,000m peaks: -18C or 0F
    • For 7,000m peaks:-23C or -10F (If you sleep cold consider -29C or -20F)
    • For 8,000m peaks: -29C or -20F (If you sleep cold consider -40C or -40F)

  • An additional down sleeping bag for basecamp for the following climbs: Everest, Lhotse, AmaDablam, Manaslu, Cho Oyu, Shishapangma, Broad Peak, K2, Gasherbrum I and II, Spantik, K2/Broad Peak Everest training climb. For Mastagata a second sleeping bag is optional, but highly recommended.

    • Down base camp sleeping bag should be rated to -10C or 15F (If you sleep cold consider -18C or 0F)

  • 2 closed cell foam kari-mats (sleeping pads) for use in basecamp and high altitude (these can be purchased inexpensively in Kathmandu)
  • High quality inflatable sleeping pad designed for cold weather (Thermarest)
  • Patch kit for inflatable pad

Rucksack and Travel Bags:

  • Medium rucksack/backpack (50-70 litres / 3000-4500 cubic inches, can be used as carry-on bag)
  • Waterproof rucksack cover (optional)
  • 2 large (120+ L / 7500+ cubic inch) duffle kit bags for clothing and equipment
  • Small luggage locks for duffel kit bags

Personal Hygiene:

  • Female or male hygiene supplies
  • 2 tubes lip sun cream
  • Large tube skin sun cream (min factor 30)
  • Anti-mosquito cream
  • Toothpaste/brush
  • Hand sanitizer gel (small-medium bottle)
  • Bar of soap small towel
  • Hand wipes

Medical:

  • Small personal first-aid kit. (Simple and Light) Aspirin, first-aid tape, plasters (band-aids), personal medications, etc.
  • Blister repair kit
  • 10 anti-diarrhea pills
  • 20 anti-headache pills
  • 10 cough and/or cold medicine
  • Anti-altitude sickness pills: Diamox, Acetylzolamide (optional)
  • 10 Stomach antibiotics: Ciprofloxacin, etc.
  • 5 Azithomycine tables
  • Steri pen or bottle of water purification tablets
  • Cough sweets/lozenges (Halls/Stepils)
  • Earplugs
  • Extra prescription glasses/contact lenses and supplies

Personal Food:

  • Snack food/daily energy food

    • Everest training Nepal/Tibet, AmaDablam, Baruntse: 2-4kg (4.5-9lbs)
    • Spantik, Cho Oyu, Shishapangma, Mustagata, Manasu: 2-5kg (4.5-11lbs)
    • Broad Peak, K2, Gasherbrum I/II, K2/Everest training, Everest, Lhotse: 3-6kg (6.5-13lbs)

  • Dehydrated meals (freeze-dried dinners) for summit attempt

    • Everest training Nepal/Tibet, AmaDablam: 2 meals
    • Spantik, Cho Oyu, Shishapangma, Mustagata, Manasu, Baruntse: 3 meals
    • Broad Peak, K2, Gasherbrum I/II, K2/Everest training, Everest, Lhotse: 5 meals
Practical:

  • Small roll of repair tape
  • Sewing repair kit
  • Cigarette lighter
  • Small box matches
  • Compass or GPS
  • Battery powered alarm clock/watch
  • Camera with extra cards and extra batteries
  • Nylon stuff sacks for food and gear storage
  • 2 water bottles (1 litre) wide-mouth Nalgene
  • Pee bottle (1litre or larger)
  • Plastic cup and spoon
  • Small folding knife
  • Binoculars (optional)
  • 4 large, waterproof, disposable rubbish sacks
  • Passport, 2 extra passport photos, flight ticket, flight itinerary
  • Separate photocopies of passport and relevant visa pages, proof of insurance
  • Dollars, pounds, or euros cash
  • Bank/ATM/Cash and credit cards
  • Bathing suit/swim suit (you never know)
  • Paperback books, playing cards, ipod/mp3 player, musical instruments, extra batteries, etc.
  • Travel clothes for basecamp and in town
  • Umbrella (optional)
  • Small solar panels for personal electronics (optional)


Group Equipment:

We provide group gear, equipment, and supplies including: rope, ice, rock, and snow anchor protection, tents; stoves, fuel, walkie-talkie radios, bamboo marker wands, etcetera. A personal tent will be provided for each member at base camp. On the upper mountain, team members will share tents. In base camp, a shower, toilet, solar charger, and a dining tent will be provided.

Lhakpa Ri/North Col Climbing Expedition Questions Section

Mount Lhakpa Ri/North Col Expedition Climbing Application

Please fill out an application and return it to us with your refundable ten-percent deposit to hold your place on the team.


In addition to your application, we will need the following at least two months before the trip begins:
 

  • Completed Payment
  • Oxygen order (if any)
  • Sherpa order (if any)
  • Trip Registration form
  • 1 Passport sized photo
  • A scan of your passport identification pages
  • Complete flight itinerary
  • Proof of travel, accident, and repatriation insurance. We strongly recommend Global Rescue, with at least $50,000 worth of helicopter rescue insurance.
  • Trip cancellation/interruption insurance is recommended

Please contact us with any questions you may have.

everest north side
Camp 1. Photo Elyse P

Everest Tibet Training Climb NorthCol Program Description

Please click one of the links below to view that section of our introductory information or just scroll down (photo lhakpari northcol climb and trainingbelow by www.lhakpari.nepal-online.de: A good view of the route up Lhakpa Ri).

 
 
  • The North Col on Everest is 7000 metres/23,000 feet high, North Col at 6,800 metres/22,300 feeta spectacular location with incredible views and is directly on the main climbing route for Everest from Tibet. It is located on a high snow ridge above advanced basecamp. We teach you everything you need to know in special training sessions in base camp and the few days of climbing are mainly steep walking. The actual climbing on this fun trekking peak could be best described as steep walking/climbing, with climbers attached to fixed ropes and the dates we have chosen run in conjunction with the exciting spring Everest climbing season. Climbing up to the North Col could qualify you for climbing Everest

    (photo right by Ryan Waters: Climbers approaching the North Col at 6,800 metres/22,300 feet).

  • Lhakpa Ri is a pyramidal trekking peak at roughly the same height as the North Col, located across from Everest on the East Rongbuk Glacier. We teach you everything you need to know in special training sessions in basecamp and the few days of climbing are mainly steep walking. The actual climbing on this fun trekking peak could be best described as steep walking/climbing, with climbers roped together and the dates we have chosen run in conjunction with the exciting spring Everest climbing season. Climbing Lhakpa Ri could qualify you for climbing Everest
Our tents at the North Col at 7000 metres-23,000 feet, also known as camp 1. Photo David O Brien everest tibet, advance basecamp, northcol  reaching northcol

Our tents at the North Col at 7000 metres-23,000 feet, also known as camp 1. Photo David O Brien. Summit seen from ABC. Ry Fable. John and Edmond working on fix line to climb Northcol. Photo Katya. Team reaching Northcol. Photo David Roeske.

    • Our proposed schedule allows for acclimatization, training, practice and rest. Our expedition is cautious and careful, with excellent leadership, organization, Sherpa climbers, cooks and waiters, tasty food, the best equipment, two full kitchens in basecamp plus advanced basecamp, 1000s of metres of fixed rope, rock ice and snow anchors, top-quality high altitude tents and high altitude stoves, expedition mix gas, and full safety equipment: medical oxygen, gamow bag, and extensive medical kit. You do not have to carry a heavy rucksack for any portion of the trip.
    • This expedition to the North Col/Lhakpa Ri maximizes many prior expeditions, years of accumulated wisdom of the high Himalaya, a strong record of reaching the top of 7000 metre/23,000 foot & 6000 metre/20,000 foot peaks: Mustagata , Aconcagua, Island Peak, Ama Dablam, Kilimanjaro, Mt. Kenya, North Col, Lhakpa Ri, and many other summits. In addition to our growing number of successful worldwide expeditions, we have an intimate knowledge of the Tibetan and Chinese officials who regulate the permit system. We have been running expeditions to Tibet since 1986, and we know all of the liaison officers, sherpas, cooks, yak drivers, and hoteliers/restaurateurs personally. back to top  Trekking between basecamp and interim camp, which is located at 5,800 metres/19,000 feet, and halfway to ABC
  • Leader and staff: During the drive, trek, in Chinese Base, ABC and on the climb, our experienced staff is with you all of the way. Our helpful climbing sherpas are some of the best. They are real high-altitude star-performers and very friendly. Our western leader is a highly experienced, friendly, and well-organized professional with multiple ascents of North Col/Lhakpa Ri. Our skillful cooks prepare delicious, fresh, tasty food and hot drinks at least 3 times a day (photo right by Fredrik Strang: Trekking between basecamp and interim camp, which is located at 5,800 metres/19,000 feet, and halfway to ABC).
    • On trek: Our western leader, together with friendly and helpful sherpas, cooks and local people leading yak caravans carry all of your personal equipment, group equipment, and set up camp each day, prepare and serve delicious meals, so you can relax and enjoy the trek. You do not need to carry a heavy rucksack during the trek.
    • Our comfortable basecamp and ABC: Features your own private sleeping tent that will be all your own, not needing to be shared with anyone. We have comfortable, heated dining tents with tables and chairs where our cooks and waiters will serve you delicious meals
    • On the mountain: Our western leader and group sherpas will fix the route, set up the high camps and carry the group equipment, such as tents, stoves, etc. If you wish to help out, we welcome you to do so, otherwise just relax and focus on getting well acclimated and achieving your goals. You do not need to carry a heavy rucksack during the climb. back to top Our comfortable ABC at 6400 metres/21,000 feet. Located at the foot of Everest, this is perhaps the highest basecamp in the world. This is an exciting place to be, as teams from all over the world are preparing or in motion to climb the highest peak on the planet
  • Everest National Park: The park is situated among rolling, vast green (in May-June) short-grass and boulder strewn valleys leading up to the base of the mountain. The environment is beautiful and stark, inhabited with wild birds and animals. Upon reaching basecamp, you trek towards the mountain, where the vegetation changes to become more alpine and rocky, with the mountain looming upwards and the best views of Mt. Everest possible from this altitude, either in Tibet or Nepal. Plants in the park range from spruce, pine, a wide variety of evergreen trees, as well as coldbelt grasslands. Many precious animals inhabit Tibet, such as antelope, deer, fox, gazelles, yaks, and many species of birds (photo right by Ryan Waters: Our comfortable ABC at 6400 metres/21,000 feet. Located at the foot of Everest, this is perhaps the highest basecamp in the world. This is an exciting place to be, as teams from all over the world are preparing or in motion to climb the highest peak on the planet).
  • Drive to basecamp: Our drive from Kathmandu, into Tibet and finally to basecamp is a relaxing and interesting adventure. We stop in medieval looking towns with dirt streets, experience Tibetan culture, while stopping to walk each day or so in the beautiful surrounding hills to acclimate to the rising altitude. It offers a great chance to encounter the vast Tibetan plateau and the surrounding Himalayan Giants. We end at Chinese base camp at 5200 metres/17,000 feet, which is located just near the ancient and active Rongbuk Monastery. Along the way we stay and eat at rustic hotels at the organizer's expense.
  • Lhasa option: If you wish to add on a tour of the ancient city of Lhasa before arriving at basecamp, this is easily arranged so please let us know. Most people will prefer to fly to Kathmandu first to take advantage of the excellent equipment shopping there, then fly to Lhasa. The price includes a spectacular flight from Kathmandu to Lhasa over the Mount Everest massif. Some people prefer to fly to Lhasa from another city in China and we can also assist you with these arrangements.  back to top
everest tibet, yaks, views view The magnificent Potala Palace. Photo David O'Brien chinese basecamp, everest basecamp climber reaching next camps, northcol

Yaks are ready for loads. Photo David O'Brien. Team Members are Chinese Basecamp. Near camp 3. Photo David O Brien

  • Trek to advanced basecamp: A beautiful trek to the base of the highest peak in the world. This trek is very accomplishable by the average person who enjoys walking. Normally, you never step on snow and there is no climbing, only walking on moraine trails. From basecamp we trek up the amazing Rongbuk glacier, also known as the "Golden Highway", where there are gorgeous views of stunning peaks in the area, including Lakpa-Ri and all of its "Little Sisters", as well as Changtse and of course Everest. At 6,400 meters/21,000 feet, Advanced Basecamp (ABC) must be the highest basecamp in the world. Slightly above ABC, one of our Everest climbing expedition members is heading up to ascend the North Col, where camp 1 is located at 7000 metres/23,000 feet
  • Walking/Climbing Lhakpa Ri or North Col:
    • North Col: After ABC, clip in to the fixed ropes for a sloping glacier walk up to the North Col (camp 1) at 7000 metres/24,900 feet. The North Col on Everest is gained by trekking moderate snow with an ascending device (jumar), descender, ice axe and crampons. The slopes are 20 to 48 degrees with one small 5 metre/16 foot-high ice-step, all safely ascended and descended on fixed ropes. North Col is a pass between the Everest North East Ridge and beautiful Mount Changtse. There are incredible views here, looking towards Pumori in Nepal, as well as Lhakpa Ri (Photo right by Tunc Findik: Slightly above ABC, one of our Everest climbing expedition members is heading up to ascend the North Col, where camp 1 is located at 7000 metres/23,000 feet).
    • Lhakpa Ri: From ABC we head across the glacier to the pyramidal mountain on the flanks of the East Rongbuk Glacier. The walk follows a shallow, snow-filled depression on the southwest flank, ascending low-angled snow for the first half of the rise. It then steepens to angles of 30 to 35 degrees. After gaining the crest of the ridge close to the Lhakpa La, the route turns south and follows the snow ridge to the summit. Upon reaching the summit, we are afforded some of the best views of Everest and the surrounding Himalaya from either the Nepal or Tibet side.
Annette and Lhotse summiter Herman Kristen (the first Dutchman to summit Mt. Lhotse in 2008), near the summit of Lhakpa Ri (Peter Hage) Dawa Sherpa assisting Ken Stalter across a crevasse on the North Col (Dan Mazur). Members climbing to North Col - Photo Scott Patch Adi Koszta climbing up to the North Col

Annette and Lhotse summiter Herman Kristen (the first Dutchman to summit Mt. Lhotse in 2008), near the summit of Lhakpa Ri (Peter Hage). Dawa Sherpa assisting Ken Stalter across a crevasse on the North Col (Dan Mazur). Members climbing to North Col - Photo Scott Patch. Adi Koszta climbing up to the North Col.

  • Rest Days: We will be taking a lot of them throughout the expedition. During our rest days we will relax and enjoy a bit of walking and exploring in the surrounding countryside and local hills to get great views of Everest and the other Himalaya Giants. We encourage you to concentrate on recovering, eating and drinking, to read, relax, listen to music and stroll around visiting other teams. back to top
  • Who is this trip for?
    • We encourage men and women from around the world, of all ages to join us as an individual team member or with your own group , whether that is your spouse, partner, friends, sibling, clients, colleagues, etc. Most of our members join as individuals, our team dynamics work well, and we are able to build successful and safe groups of people that enjoy trekking, climbing, and traveling together (photo right by Tunc Findik: One of our team members taking a short hike above Chinese basecamp. On our rest days along the trek, we will have plenty of time to trek and explore the surrounding Tibetan plateau and get spectacular views of the Himalaya all around us. The pace allows you to do as little or as much hiking as you feel comfortable with, as you slowly acclimate to the rising altitude before setting out to ABC).
    • During the Lhakpa-Ri/North Col expedition, we teach you all of the skills needed to ascend safely in special training sessions in basecamp and advanced basecamp. Our training covers glacier travel, ascending and descending ropes safely, etcetera. If you do not already know about mountaineering you are welcome to join us and see how you feel at 7000 metres/23,000 feet.
    • If you decide you like it, we welcome you to join one of our 8000 metre climbs the next season, or if you are determined, a few weeks after climbing Lhakpa-Ri or the North Col, you could try going for the summit of Everest, or Cho Oyu the 6th highest mountain in the world.
    • To participate in this expedition you must be a very fit and active winter-walker in good health. Prior to joining our group, please see your doctor and obtain the necessary permission and advice. back to top
  Chris Bailley using ladder to ascent while Martin taking a picture of him. Photo Rikke. Member using fixed rope while climbing up NorthCol. Photo Chris Bailley Chris Bailley carefully climbing up. Photo Rikke.
 

Member using fixed rope while climbing up NorthCol. Photo Chris Bailley. Member using fixed rope while climbing up NorthCol. Photo Chris Bailley.

Please "click" one of the links on the column on the upper right of your screen under "Everest Tibet Training Climb" to learn more about our expedition. back to top

Lhakpa Ri/North Col of Everest Expedition Route Description

Please click one of the links below to view that section for the route on Lhakpa RI/North Col, or scroll down.


Introduction-

The North Col on Everest is 7000 metres/23,000 feet, high and a spectacular location with incredible views and is located directly on the main climbing route for climbing Everest from Tibet. Climbing up to the North Col could qualify you for climbing Everest. It is located on a high snow ridge above advanced basecamp. The slopes are 20 to 48 degrees. The North Col on Everest is gained by ascending a steep snow and ice face with an ascending device (jumar) and ice axe and crampons. The climbing could be best described as steep walking/climbing, with climbers attached to fixed ropes at all times, and the dates we have chosen feature some of the most stable weather, with avalanche conditions at their most safest of the year. Our proposed schedule allows for plenty of acclimatization, training, practice and rest, as well as two possible summit attempts. Our style of climbing is cautious and careful, with excellent leadership, organization, Sherpa climbers, cooks and waiters, tasty food, the best equipment, two full kitchens in basecamp plus advanced basecamp, 1000s of metres of fixed line, hundreds of rock ice and snow anchors, top-quality high altitude tents and high altitude stoves, expedition mix gas, and full safety equipment: medical oxygen, gamow bag, and extensive medical kit.

This expedition to Lhakpa Ri and the North Col (Sometimes spelled Lakpa Ri / Northcol) maximizes many years of accumulated wisdom of the high Himalaya, a strong record of reaching the top of 8,000ers: Everest, K2, Kangchenjunga, Lhotse, Makalu, Cho-Oyu, Shishapangma, and many other 8,000 metre summits, in addition to more than 25 Himalayan expeditions, in all safety, along with an intimate knowledge of the Tibetan and Chinese officials who regulate the permit system. We have conducted countless 7000 metre peak expeditions, and consider ourselves specialists in identifying, organizing expeditions to, and getting teams safely to the summit and back down, of the world's 7000ers. We have been running expeditions to Tibet since 1986, and we know all of the bureaucratic officials, liaison officers, yak drivers, and hoteliers/restaurateurs personally. back to top


Itinerary-

The proposed itinerary allows enough time for proper acclimatization, rest days, and several returns to base camp where the kitchen and base camp staff can look after all of your needs, and quell your appetite. The weather at this time of year is normally quite good and stable. However, we all know the global weather is changing, and in case of storms, you will note the proposed itinerary includes extra days as well. In previous expeditions, half of those who reached the summit needed every single "extra" day. back to top

Weather-

At low elevation, the temperatures can vary from 27°c to -7°c ( 80°f to 20°f). At higher elevations, the temperature can vary from 16°c to -23°c (60°f to -10°f). The wind is the most chilling factor, and can be quite variable, with everything from a flat calm, to hurricane force on the summit. There may be deep snow, heavy rains, mosquitoes in wet areas, blowing dust, burning heat, bright sunshine.

Arriving in Kathmandu-

The trip begins in the ancient and colorful city of Kathmandu (you could also start in Beijing). You stay in a comfortable, simple, clean, hot-water hotel, at minimal cost and sample some of the very reasonably-priced tasty Nepalese, Tibetan and Western-Style cuisine, available at the hundreds of local restaurants. During your free days in Kathmandu, while your Chinese visa is being processed, you shall finalize arrangements, purchase and hire the bits of equipment you might be missing at the hundreds of mountain-climbing and trekking equipment shops in the neighborhood (with low prices, as well), and take time out for trinket hunting, with suggested visits to explore the 17th century splendors of the Monkey Temple, the Durbar Square and old Kings Palace, as well as the ancient cities of Patan, and Bakhtapur. We also have several member and training sessions during these days, where our leaders spend time with you reviewing climbing techniques and equipment, going over medical and safety procedures, etcetera. If you are concerned about the altitude and have purchased Diamox (acetylzolamide) , which is inexpensively available with no doctor's prescription in Kathmandu, this might be the time to begin taking it. back to top

Optional Tour of Lhasa-

Some members wish to add an optional trip to Lhasa before reaching basecamp. If this includes you, most members will fly to Kathmandu first, then to Lhasa. Some people prefer to fly to Lhasa from another city in China and we can also assist you with these arrangements. For those flying from Kathmandu, you take a 1 hour and 45 minute flight in a jet over Mt. Everest and the spine of the Himalaya, arriving in Tibet's capital city. In the past, we have had some fabulous views out of the plane windows during this flight. 

At 3650 metres/12,000 feet of elevation, Lhasa was established around 600 AD on the banks of the Brahmaputra River. The heart of the city is centered around the Jokhang Temple, the most sacred building in all of Tibet. Our simple hotel is not too far from the famous Potale palace, Jokhang palace and the renowned Barkhor Market, where you can shop for exotic handicrafts and religious art from all across Tibet, China, and Buddhist India.

After flying to Lhasa, upon arrival you will rest for 2 nights and one day. It's important that you use the rest day to get acclimated to the high altitude.

 

barkhor.JPG (37653 bytes)

Buddhist pilgrims from Amdo region circumambulating the Jokhang Temple in the Barkhor market. Photo: J. Otto.

It is a three day drive from Lhasa to basecamp. From Lhasa, you will set out in government cars across the Tibetan plateau to meet the rest of the team in Tingri, before reaching Everest basecamp.

The following morning after your day in Lhasa, you will drive to Shigatse at 3650 metres/12,000 feet, the second largest city in Tibet, with a famous Monastery. The road winds along the massive Brahmaputra River, past traditional warren-like Tibetan farm towns. In Shigatse, you can have a look around and try to visit the 15th century Tashilunpo Monastery, the largest active monastic institution in Tibet. Monks in maroon robes seem to be everywhere, going about their daily chores, praying, and practicing ceremonial music performances.

After Shigatse, you will make the scenic drive to the ancient city of Lhaze (Lhatse), at 4000 metres/13,100 feet . At the western end of town is the small Changmoche Monastery, which you may visit while there. You can see interesting views of the surrounding Tibetan plateaus and hills.

From Lhaze, it is another scenic drive to the town of Tingri at 4,342 meters/14,200 feet, where you will meet up with the rest of the team and continue towards Everest basecamp. back to top

tashilunpo.JPG (56157 bytes)

The Tashilunpo Monastery in Shigatse, where more than 700 monks live and worship in the Buddhist religion. (Photo: J. Otto)

on the road.JPG (43767 bytes)

A Tibetan farmer brings his goods to market on the road near Lhaze. (Photo D.L. Mazur)

Driving to Basecamp-

After the finalization of your Chinese visa, early morning drive to Rusuwaghadi at 2557 metres, 8389 feet. We clear Nepalese customs and immigration, and then hire local porters and vehicles to carry your bags across broader. Upon entering Tibet, the clocks immediately go forward by 2 ¼ hours. Our secondary government liaison officer will meet us in Gyirong. After clearing Tibetan customs and immigration, we will stay rest & acclimatization in Gyirong. Walk around the local hills. Hotel.

back to top

Bouldering in Nyalam on our rest day (Felix Berg). On the road to Tingri, Himalayan Giants in the background (DL Mazur). Our sturdy Tibetan trucks carry the equipment, here being loaded by our Sherpas (Tim Spear).

In the morning we continue our bus-ascent into the Tibetan plateau, to the town of Tingri at 4,342 meters/14,200 feet. There are superb views of Shishapangma, Cho-Oyu, and Everest as we drive into Tingri. The town itself is a very basic one-street hamlet surrounded by the tents of nomadic Tibetans. About ½ of all ethnic Tibetans living in Tibet are nomadic or semi-nomadic. Our extremely rustic little hotel has an adequate restaurant, and it will be interesting to see if the high altitude has quelled our appetites for tasty fresh food. There are the ruins of an old fortress on a rise above town, and from here we can see the finest views of Everest , Lhotse, Cho-Oyu, and Shishipangma. We will take a rest day the following day in Tingri to adjust to the altitude.

A stop along the road near Tingri. There is a simply developed hot springs here. Only the very brave are able to tempt fate by entering the dirty water(Bruce Manning). back to top

The following morning, after what for many is a relatively sleep-free night, we drive the 70 kilometers/40 miles, to Everest base camp at around 5,200 meters/17,000 feet. The drive follows a dirt road along the Rongbuk Valley and has spectacular views of the Himalaya. Chinese base camp is located just near the medieval and active Rongbuk Monastery.

We will spend another 5 days resting, acclimatising, exploring the surrounding hills and organizing equipment into Yak loads at Chinese base.

Preparing our yak loads at Chinese basecamp (Bruce Manning). Blue mountain sheep in the cliffs above basecamp (Felix Berg). back to top

Moving to Advanced Basecamp-

We then spend the next day moving up to the "interim camp", which is located at 5,800 metres/19,000 feet, and halfway to the "advanced basecamp (ABC)". We will also take 2 rest days to acclimate to the change in altitude.

Yak train heading up to interim camp (Bruce Manning). Interim Camp at 5800 metres/19,000 feet, where we acclimate for a day or two before heading up to ABC (Tim Spear).

Next, we spend two days working our way up to ABC. 6,400 meters/21,000 feet, ABC must be the highest basecamp in the world. It is located on a rocky moraine next to the Rongbuk Glacier.

Franck walking up the Rongbuk to ABC (Tim Spear). Our comfortable ABC at 6400 metres/21,000 feet, A view of the mountain at sunset from ABC (Ryan Waters).

Upon reaching ABC, we will take another rest and acclimatization day, this time going over our equipment, safety procedures, climbing techniques, cooking and camping methods, and working to form ourselves into a more cohesive team. back to top

Climbing Lhakpa Ri or the North Col

After resting and completing our training, we will begin our climb of Lhakpa Ri or the North Col.

Through the following 4 days, we will cautiously climb the mountain, fixing rope where necessary, according to the schedule suggested below. After ascending to the 7,045 metre/23,100 foot summit of Lhakpa Ri, or climbing up to the 7,000 metre/23,000 foot North Col on Everest, we will descend and make our way back down to advanced basecamp.

Climbers approaching the North Col at 6800 metres/22,300 feet. Lines are fixed here for safety. Our tents at the North Col at 7000 metres, also known as camp 1. Climbers Walking up to the 7500 metre/24,600 feet, camp, also known as camp 2. You can see the tents in the North Col in the background (Ryan Waters). Our team members on the summit of Lhakpa Ri on a perfect day in the Himalaya (Dale Wagner). back to top

Going Home-

After packing up all of your equipment, supplies, and rubbish, you will make a short return trek and drive to Tingri, have a feast at the restaurant and stay in the hotel. The following morning, you are up early, and drive all the way down to Gyirong, hire porters to carry everything over the Nepal Boarder, and then catch a bus into Kathmandu, where you can enjoy a hot shower and a grand Nepalese western-style feast. In Kathmandu, you can have a day to relax, celebrate, tour the valley, write postcards, and do a bit more shopping, before heading home. We hope you had a safe, enjoyable, and successful adventure. Thanks for joining in!   back to top

Thank You for joining our Lhakpa Ri/North Col Expedition.

Everest Tibet Training Climb Expedition to North Col - Camp 1 Reviews, Testimonials, Complaints, and Comments.

Please scroll down to read our Reviews

Here is what Edmond says:
I vouch for it! A great trip and a chance to stand on Everest's shoulder.

Here’s what John has to say: I think that everyone did a great job.  I was surprised at the logistics there are in getting people from all over the world organized and geared properly and to the starting point, let alone up the mountain. Very impressive! 

The trip leaders, sherpa’s, cooks, and drivers were all first rate.  We had a great Sherpa and didn’t seem to need much from the team leader.  If anyone is unsure whether they can go for the summit or not, then this is a good way to feel all of the parts of the climb. You can then decide later if you think that you can summit the next time. (or at least try)  I am in that exact thought process now! I could not have been happier with everything

 John and Edmond are in ABC. Photo-Katya

John and Edmond working on fix line to climb Northcol. Photo Katya. John and Edmond are in ABC. Photo-Katya.

Here is what Steven Says: I just wanted to say thanks to all of the SummitClimb team for a great trip, as you know things were up and down and changing almost every day and in some cases every hour.

The SummitClimb leader did a great job with me and the clients he has, I realise the rest of the group are still on Everest or Cho I am back home now and just wanted to say Thanks for all your help.
Can you please pass on my best regards to everyone.  

Photo Steven Greenhalgh. Yak-carrying our expedition equipment at ABC.-Photo-Katya

Here is what Tom says: It was an awesome expedition. Solid team. The sherpas were dedicated, friendly, good English. Top-notch food and accommodation. Lots of jokes and good times. The leader was a champ. Thanks for putting it all together. It was a privilege to be a part of it. I still look at my high altitude boots everyday and wish i was back there =). Thanks, Tom

(photo by Ryan Waters: Climbers approaching the North Col at 6,800 metres/22,300 feet). (photo by Fredrik Strang: Trekking between basecamp and interim camp, which is located at 5,800 metres/19,000 feet, and halfway to ABC).

Here is what Troy says: "First of all thanks for everything. I appreciate everything you did to make this a safe and successful expedition."

Here is what Bruce says:
"I thought the expedition worked well and it was another good group of people you put together. I look forward to climbing together again and seeing you next time."

Annette and Lhotse summiter Herman Kristen (the first Dutchman to summit Mt. Lhotse in 2008), near the summit of Lhakpa Ri (Peter Hage). Dawa Sherpa assisting Ken Stalter across a crevasse on the North Col (Dan Mazur).

Here is what Phil has to say: "The expedition is ideal for individuals or groups of climbers who wish to participate in a Himalayan expedition at a reasonable price. The price is only slightly higher than the cost of organizing your own independent expedition. You have the wealth of experience provided by the organizers and land leaders, who use no middlemen, dealing directly with the government mountaineering office.

Allows a member to experience the Himalayas a little bit as the first pioneer climbers did when there was no such thing as commercial expeditions. Some climbers without the contacts and knowledge to organize their own trip will enjoy how all logistics are taken care of by professionals, from your arrival at the airport to your departure from the staging city.

All group equipment and oxygen used is of the finest quality and replaced on a frequent basis. Leaders are professional climbers, there to assist the members and give advice rather than just dragging someone to the summit and down. The western leaders and local Nepalese and Tibetan Sherpas are some of the best, season after season.

The style of expedition is structured but relaxed with all team members having a say in the day to day running of the trip, although the leaders have the final decision on issues that effect the safety of the team. Of course, some people will prefer to pay the higher prices asked by some of the professional guiding companies.

The expedition provides similar high mountain and base camp food and equipment as the higher priced companies, and especially pride themselves on the training of the Nepalese and Tibetan sherpas in technical climbing, and assisting the members in every way. The kitchen staff are diligent in their tasty food production, preparing plenty of hot drinks, and hygiene practices.

You come home after the expedition with a sense of achievement and friendship. You have been a team member in an expedition rather than a guided client."

Sherpas and climbers at crampon point after descending North Col from Summit - Photo mia Graeffe Members at ABC dining tent reliving the summit bid - Photo Mia Graeffe

Sherpas and climbers at crampon point after descending North Col from Summit - Photo mia Graeffe.Members at ABC dining tent reliving the summit bid - Photo Mia Graeffe. 

Here is what Arnold has to say about climbing Lhakpa Ri/North Col:

"It’s a full service expedition with everything taken care of. Or you can go in simple style with the basic climb.

It involves some very interesting history of Mallory and Irvine and the 1920s expeditions.

SummitClimb's strong team has fixed the route two years in a row.

It's less of a circus atmosphere.

There is a nice slow pace of approach and climb.

The challenging and breathtaking trek to ABC along the "miracle highway" has been referred to as "like crossing the moon".

There are many rest periods at low altitude villages between forays to the cold and windy heights. It keeps you strong.

Our leaders are very team focused, dedicated and hard working, with attention to the member's needs and details.

Our teams are focused on letting each member go at his/her own pace with support from our leaders and sherpas.

We have excellent staff and Sherpas.

The basecamp food is excellent with plenty of hot drinks.

Our equipment is strong and plentiful."

Here is what Garth had to say:

"Good that we are all back safe and sound, well done to you! I had a fantastic time out in Tibet, what an incredible experience. Jon, the Prentice Brothers and myself left Tibet saying that we would return

We take our member's feedback and testimonials seriously. These help us to refine and make our Lhakpa Ri/North Col expeditions a successful, safe, and enjoyable experience for our future teams.

What our clients say?

  • Here is what Troy says:

    "First of all thanks for everything. I appreciate everything you did to make this a safe and successful expedition."

  • Here is what Bruce says:

    "I thought the expedition worked well and it was another good group of people you put together. I look forward to climbing together again and seeing you next time."

  • Here is what Steven Says

    I just wanted to say thanks to all of the SummitClimb team for a great trip, as you know things were up and down and changing almost every day and in some cases every hour.

    The SummitClimb leader did a great job with me and the clients he has, I realise the rest of the group are still on Everest or Cho I am back home now and just wanted to say Thanks for all your help.
    Can you please pass on my best regards to everyone.