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UK: +44 (0)7810 375400 & USA: +1 360-570-0715 info@summitclimb.com
UK: +44 (0)7810 375400 & USA: +1 360-570-0715

Mount Shishapangma Climb - Personal & Team Equipment

  • shishapangma photos Member Summit Shishapangma. Photo Grace.
  • shishapangma photos Climbing near the Gendarmes on our summit attempt at around 7600 metres/25,000 feet. Photo Dan Mazur
  • Shishapangma climb Member hiking around Nylam. Photo Max
  • shishapangma photos Our team nearing the Gendarmes at 7600 metres/25,000 feet. Photo Max Kausch
  • shishapangma photos Everest massif seen from Shishapangma. Photo Max Kausch
  • shishapangma photos Way to camp 2. Photo Max Kausch.
  • shishapangma photos Camp 1. Photo Max Kausch.
  • shishapangma photos Yaks leaving Shisha Pangma. Photo Max Kausch
  • shishapangma photos Member climbing up to camp 2. Photo Max Kausch
  • shishapangma photos Our interim camp at about 5200 metres/17,000 feet. Our team is about halfway between basecamp and ABC. Photo Dan Mazur
  • shishapangma photos Our tents buried at camp 1. Photo Max Kausch.
  • shishapangma photos Members trekking to ABC Photo Grace McDonald.
  • shishapangma photos Our team heading up from ABC to camp 1 at 6200 metres/20,300 feet. Photo Dan Mazur
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Below is a detailed list of equipment you need to bring for Shishapangma and at the bottom is a description of team equipment that we bring for you. (Click Link below to go directly to that section of the personal equipment list or just scroll down):

Please go to our personal & team equipment section of the "Shishapangma Questions" for additional information and detailed discussion of the equipment lists below.

Where should I purchase my equipment?

Please "click here" to view our list of recommendations on where to purchase kit from our Shishapangma Frequently Asked Questions.

Climbing-

  • Climbing harness;
  • 5 metres / 15 feet of 6mm climber's accessory cord.
  • Figure 8/Abseil belay device;
  • 1 large mitten sized ascender (most members use the large petzl) and arm length leash;
  • 2 locking carabiners, 1 large and 1 small;
  • 4 regular carabiners;
  • Ice axe w/leash;
  • Crampons - must fit boots perfectly. Steel crampons with anti-balling (anti-bot) plates are the best;
  • Optional; Adjustable trekking poles;
  • Optional for skiers - Avvie (avalanche) equipment: beacon, probe, and shovel. back to top

Upper Body-

  • 2 cotton t-shirts;
  • 1 polypropylene t-shirt;
  • 2 long sleeve polypropylene shirts, lightweight;
  • 1 polar fleece pullovers, medium weight;
  • 1 polar fleece jacket.
  • Gore-Tex jacket with hood, waterproof and breathable;
  • Lightweight down jacket for those chilly days in basecamp;
  • For high altitude use, 1 very warm goose-down (duvet) jacket with hood, you may prefer a down/duvet suit; back to top
  • Umbrella (optional);

Hands-

  • 1 pr. lightweight poly-liner gloves. These will be worn when tying knots, but not inside your mitts;
  • 1 pair mittens, consists of 1 Gore-tex over mitt matched with the very warm polar fleece mitt liner (For more about high altitude mitts, please click here).

Head-

  • Helmet;
  • Warm hat wool or synthetic that covers your ears;
  • Balaclava;
  • Face mask;
  • Ballcap or brimmed suncap;
  • Glacier sunglasses with side shields (you can purchase these inexpensively in Kathmandu, including prescription sunglasses, which can be made for $20, it might take a week or two);
  • 1 pair ski goggles (Optional) with light and dark lens;
  • Headlamp with extra batteries and bulbs;
  • Bandana or head scarf, also useful for dusty conditions. back to top

Lower Body-

  • Cotton underwear briefs;
  • 1 pair walking shorts;
  • 1 pair walking trousers for trekking and around camp;
  • 2 pair lightweight thermal bottoms;
  • 1 pair medium or expedition weight thermal bottoms;
  • 1 pair polar fleece trousers;
  • 1 pair Gore-Tex trousers, salopettes, or bibs. Waterproof/breathable with full side zips;
  • 1 pr. Goose-down (duvet) trousers , salopettes or bibs. You may prefer a down (duvet) suit.

Your clothing should be kept dry using waterproof stuff sacks, bin-liners, or large plastic bags. back to top

Feet-

  • 1 pair One-Sport Millet Everest boots or or similar design(plastic climbing boots are not warm enough, even with over-boots or over-gaiters);
  • 1 pair sturdy leather walking boots with good ankle support (we mean leather trekking, not climbing boots) for the walk to advanced basecamp and to camp 1;
  • 1 pair trainers, running shoes and/or sandals for Kathmandu and in camp;
  • 1 pair down booties (optional);
  • 2 pair med-heavy poly or wool socks;
  • 2- pair of liner socks. Polypropylene or wool;
  • vapour barrier liner socks or plastic bread-bags;
  • 2 pair lightweight trekking socks, poly or wool;
  • Cotton socks for in town.
Sleeping-
  • For high altitude, 1 down (duvet) sleeping bag (rated to – 20 Centigrade or -0 Fahrenheit). In the high camp, you can sleep in your down (duvet) clothing inside your sleeping bag;
  • 1 additional sleeping bag for basecamp (good to -10 degrees C or 10 degrees F);
  • At least 3 closed cell foam kari-mats for use in basecamp and high altitude, We do not recommend inflatable mats, as we have never seen one not puncture. You can buy these non inflatable mats very inexpensively in Kathmandu. Why carry foam mats around the world, when you can purchase them inexpensively in Kathmandu?

Your sleeping bags should be kept dry using waterproof stuff sacks, bin-liners, or large plastic bags. back to top

Rucksack and Travel Bags-

  • 1 medium rucksack (50-70 litres / 3000-4500 cubic inches, can be used for airplane carry);
  • Waterproof rucksack cover (optional);
  • 2 large (120 L / 7500 cubic inch) duffle kit bags for clothing and equipment. Must be durable for use on pack animals;
  • Small padlocks for duffel kit bags. back to top

Personal Hygiene-

  • female or male hygiene supplies;
  • 2 tubes lip sun cream, 1 large tube skin sun cream (min.factor 15);
  • anti-mosquito cream;
  • 1 toothpaste/brush;
  • 1 bar soap or hand sanitizer gel/1 small towel;
  • hand wipes. back to top

Medical-

Medications are inexpensive and readily available in Kathmandu with no Doctor`s prescription:

  • small personal first-aid kit. (Simple and Light) Aspirin, first-aid tape, plasters (band-aids), personal medications, etc. The leaders will have extensive first-aid kits, so leave anything extra behind. Please let your leader know about any medical issues before the climb;
  • 1 skin blister repair kit;
  • 1 small bottle anti-diarrhea pills;
  • 1 small bottle anti-headache pills;
  • 1 small bottle cough and/or cold medicine;
  • 1 small bottle anti-altitude sickness pills: Diamox, Acetylzolamide. For more about this medication, please review the information in our Shishapangma Questions.
  • 1 small bottle stomach antibiotic: Ciprofloxacin, etc.;
  • Do not bring sleeping pills. They are a respiratory depressant;
  • 1 small bottle of water purification tablets or water filter;
  • 1 set earplugs;
  • extra prescription glasses, contact lens supplies. Contact lens wearers, please bring glasses in case of emergency. A new pair could be quickly made in Kathmandu, Lhasa, or Kashgar for just $20. Please order upon arrival if you are interested. back to top

Personal Food-

On the mountain we supply plenty of food for you to cook 3 hot meals each day. This food will consist of soup, local cheese & sausage, biscuits, dried noodles, potatoes, rice, porridge, butter, dried and tinned vegetables, fruit, meats, and fish, tea with milk and sugar, powdered juice drink, and drinking chocolate. Our sherpas will be carrying this food to the higher camps.

Our skillful cooks prepare 3 delicious hot meals and plenty of drinks each day in basecamp and advanced basecamp.

  • We ask each member to bring their own imported daily snack and energy foods. We also ask members to bring 3 dehydrated meals (freeze-dried dinners) for their summit attempt. We do not provide cold “snack” food such as chocolate or "energy-bars". We ask that you bring or buy your own "snack" or daily cold energy food, 2-5 kilos is a good amount. A growing variety of imported foods such as European and American cheeses, chocolates, biscuits, cookies, nuts, and locally made power-bars are now available in Kathmandu, at realistic prices. However, imported power bars, GU, re-hydration drinks, dehydrated food, "freeze-dried meals", imported cheese and sausage are not available. If you want these items, you must bring them from your home country. Many of our members, especially Britons, Europeans, and Australians with tiny baggage allowances, now purchase their daily snacks in Kathmandu. Our schedule in Kathmandu allows plenty of time for shopping.

Practical- back to top

  • 1 small roll of repair tape, 1 sewing repair kit;
  • 1 cigarette lighter, 1 small box matches;
  • 1 compass or GPS;
  • 1 battery powered alarm clock/watch;
  • 1 camera and film, or digital camera with extra cards and extra batteries;
  • nylon stuff sacks For food and gear storage, large Ziplocs are useful also;
  • 3 Water bottles (1 litre) wide-mouth Nalgene (1 is a pee bottle);
  • 1 plastic cup and spoon;
  • 1 small folding knife;
  • binoculars (optional);
  • 4 large, waterproof, disposable rubbish sacks;
  • passport, 2 extra passport photos, flight ticket, flight itinerary;
  • separate photocopies of passport and relevant visa pages, proof of insurance;
  • dollars, pounds or euros cash for purchasing Nepalese visa at Kathmandu airport, Tibet visa, for paying for restaurants and hotels, for gratuities, snacks, and to purchase your own drinks and gifts;
  • credit cards, Bank/ATM/Cash machine cards for use for withdrawing funds from cash machines (bring a photocopy of your cards), traveler's checks, etc.;
  • 1 bathing suit/swimming costume (you never know);
  • basecamp entertainment. It is good to bring additional items which you have found to be useful on previous expeditions. For example: paperback books, playing cards, ipod mp3 player, short-wave radio, game boys, musical instruments, ear plugs, lots of batteries, etc.;
  • travel clothes for basecamp and in town.
  • Please be sure and bring your patience and try to keep an open, relaxed, positive and friendly attitude as travelling in this part of the world may be very different than what you are used to, but things always seem to fall into place at the last moment. Thank you.

This is not an exhaustive list. Please submit other equipment concerns and suggestions. Thank you. back to top

Oxygen:

You should consider whether or not you wish to use supplemental oxygen. About half of our Shishapangma team members do. Its not like Everest where oxygen is absolutely necessary, but some Shishapangma climbers like it because it gives them a little extra edge of "insurance" that they will be feeling as well as possible when resting in the high camp and on summit day, both climbing up to the summit and on descent. In addition, supplemental oxygen usage has been shown to markedly reduce the incidence of frostbite. Our sherpas will try to help you carry the oxygen, and three four-litre bottles should be more than enough, and you also need the mask, hoses, and regulator. Or, you can have the full set of three bottles, which includes mask-regulator-hoses (as well as carriage up to the high camps by our sherpas). All of the equipment is guaranteed to work well together, and it is easy to use, with simple threaded and snap-on fittings which require no tools. We have a 30% buy back policy bottles on unused oxygen, and masks, hoses, and regulators in good condition. For more information about Oxygen, please click here.

Note: You may have to carry some or all of your own oxygen on summit day, as well as up and down the mountain. If possible, the group sherpas will help stock the high camps, as well as share in carrying extra bottles during summit attempts. If you are concerned you might not be able to carry your own oxygen, you may wish to hire a personal sherpa. back to top

Group Equipment:

We provide a plethora of top-quality, and time-tested equipment, group gear, and supplies, including: rope, ice, rock, and snow anchor protection; basecamp, advanced basecamp and altitude tents; cookers, fuel, high-altitude food, walkie-talkie radios, bamboo marker wands, etcetera. We now provide an individual tent for each member in basecamp, so you do not have to share. We also have a shower and toilet tent for Basecamp. Please see the group EQUIPMENT link, in the menu bars above to study what we bring for your use and safety. back to top

Please submit any equipment questions or concerns to: info@summitclimb.com

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